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Cuba, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 10
succeeded in getting off some time during the night, and sailed up off the Fortress, where she was saluted by 21 guns by the shipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but Capt. Milligan, who went down to ascertain yesterday, reports her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A flag of truce went from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe for some time, and bears a permit from General Butler. Her account of the gloom ruling th
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but Capt. Milligan, who went down to ascertain yesterday, reports her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A flag of truce went from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe for some time, and bears a permit from General Butler. Her account of the gloom ruling the Northern mind at the reception of the news from Manassas, is scarcely conceivable; the military feeling having drooped amazingly. Luna.
Old Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 10
rrespondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va. Aug. 21, 1861. A Spanish frigate went ashore off Cape Henry beach on Monday evening. The Princes Anne Cavalry, on the beach, in attempting to render assistance, was fired at by the Quaker City. Five shots were fired and one bomb, the bomb bursting just over the head of Captain Fentress, of the cavalry, and came near killing several privates. Fortunately, however, no one was hurt. The Quaker City then steered in the direction of Old Point, where, it is thought, she went to get assistance to tow off the frigate. The frigate succeeded in getting off some time during the night, and sailed up off the Fortress, where she was saluted by 21 guns by the shipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but
Stuart (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 10
From Norfolk.[correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va. Aug. 21, 1861. A Spanish frigate went ashore off Cape Henry beach on Monday evening. The Princes Anne Cavalry, on the beach, in attempting to render assistance, was fired at by the Quaker City. Five shots were fired and one bomb, the bomb bursting just over the head of Captain Fentress, of the cavalry, and came near killing several privates. Fortunately, however, no one was hurt. The Quaker City then steered in the direction of Old Point, where, it is thought, she went to get assistance to tow off the frigate. The frigate succeeded in getting off some time during the night, and sailed up off the Fortress, where she was saluted by 21 guns by the shipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in
Pierce Butler (search for this): article 10
harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but Capt. Milligan, who went down to ascertain yesterday, reports her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A flag of truce went from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe for some time, and bears a permit from General Butler. Her account of the gloom ruling the Northern mind at the reception of the news from Manassas, is scarcely conceivable; the military feeling having drooped amazingly. Luna.
Alfred Seabury (search for this): article 10
ts her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A flag of truce went from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe for some time, and bears a permit from General Butlent from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe for some time, and bears a permit from General Butler. Her account of the gloom ruling the Northern mind at the reception of the news from Manassas, is scarcely conceivable; the military feeling having drooped amazingly. Luna.
where, it is thought, she went to get assistance to tow off the frigate. The frigate succeeded in getting off some time during the night, and sailed up off the Fortress, where she was saluted by 21 guns by the shipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but Capt. Milligan, who went down to ascertain yesterday, reports her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A flag of truce went from our city sometime last week and brought from Fort Monroe, Mrs. Seabury, wife of our excellent young townsman, Alfred Seabury, Esq. She has been in New York on a visit and has been unable to get home up to his time. We understand she has been at Fortress Monroe
gate went ashore off Cape Henry beach on Monday evening. The Princes Anne Cavalry, on the beach, in attempting to render assistance, was fired at by the Quaker City. Five shots were fired and one bomb, the bomb bursting just over the head of Captain Fentress, of the cavalry, and came near killing several privates. Fortunately, however, no one was hurt. The Quaker City then steered in the direction of Old Point, where, it is thought, she went to get assistance to tow off the frigate. The fhipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in his report; but Capt. Milligan, who went down to ascertain yesterday, reports her a Spanish frigate, just from Cuba. There were five men-of-war in the bay yesterday, probably there on account of the late showers in this section. A fl
August 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 10
From Norfolk.[correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va. Aug. 21, 1861. A Spanish frigate went ashore off Cape Henry beach on Monday evening. The Princes Anne Cavalry, on the beach, in attempting to render assistance, was fired at by the Quaker City. Five shots were fired and one bomb, the bomb bursting just over the head of Captain Fentress, of the cavalry, and came near killing several privates. Fortunately, however, no one was hurt. The Quaker City then steered in the direction of Old Point, where, it is thought, she went to get assistance to tow off the frigate. The frigate succeeded in getting off some time during the night, and sailed up off the Fortress, where she was saluted by 21 guns by the shipping in the harbor. Why this attack upon the cavalry by the Quaker City, we are at a less to determine, except it be jealousy to give aid first to a foreign vessel. She was at first supposed to be a French frigate, and was so reported by Capt. Fentress in