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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch] Norfolk, Va., Aug. 21, 1861. The foreign ship alluded to in my last is the Spanish was steamer Petronella. She is now at another in Hampton Roads. Duncan Hobertson, Esq., the Spanish Consul, has gone down to the ship, and, of course, will bring the particulars raintive'o the visit of the welcome foreigner to the waters of the Chesapeake. She anchored in the Roads some time last year, when the officers came up to the city and were properly entertained by some of our citizens. The polite Spanish officers expressed themselves in strong terms of satisfaction with regard to the manner in which they were received. A large steamship passed out to Gen. yesterday. Several large ships are still anchored off Fort Monroe. A considerable number of coasting vessels passed in the Capes on Monday and yesterday, and came to anchor in the Roads, awaiting the change of the wind from east ward. The tall pole ejected last June
ained by some of our citizens. The polite Spanish officers expressed themselves in strong terms of satisfaction with regard to the manner in which they were received. A large steamship passed out to Gen. yesterday. Several large ships are still anchored off Fort Monroe. A considerable number of coasting vessels passed in the Capes on Monday and yesterday, and came to anchor in the Roads, awaiting the change of the wind from east ward. The tall pole ejected last June by the Ecil-Everett party was taken down this morning, carried to one of the wharves and thrown overboard. It is, however, not thrown away as a worthless relic of a despot party. It will not be allowed to drift out to sea to roll upon the heaving ocean surges like the shattered main mast of some ill-fated bark wrecked by the restless power of wind and wave; although, as the banner of the flag once honored, but now disgraced, it might be well to let it thus disappear from sight to be riven and broken by the s
Duncan Hobertson (search for this): article 4
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch] Norfolk, Va., Aug. 21, 1861. The foreign ship alluded to in my last is the Spanish was steamer Petronella. She is now at another in Hampton Roads. Duncan Hobertson, Esq., the Spanish Consul, has gone down to the ship, and, of course, will bring the particulars raintive'o the visit of the welcome foreigner to the waters of the Chesapeake. She anchored in the Roads some time last year, when the officers came up to the city and were properly entertained by some of our citizens. The polite Spanish officers expressed themselves in strong terms of satisfaction with regard to the manner in which they were received. A large steamship passed out to Gen. yesterday. Several large ships are still anchored off Fort Monroe. A considerable number of coasting vessels passed in the Capes on Monday and yesterday, and came to anchor in the Roads, awaiting the change of the wind from east ward. The tall pole ejected last June
August 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
From Norfolk.[special correspondence of the Dispatch] Norfolk, Va., Aug. 21, 1861. The foreign ship alluded to in my last is the Spanish was steamer Petronella. She is now at another in Hampton Roads. Duncan Hobertson, Esq., the Spanish Consul, has gone down to the ship, and, of course, will bring the particulars raintive'o the visit of the welcome foreigner to the waters of the Chesapeake. She anchored in the Roads some time last year, when the officers came up to the city and were properly entertained by some of our citizens. The polite Spanish officers expressed themselves in strong terms of satisfaction with regard to the manner in which they were received. A large steamship passed out to Gen. yesterday. Several large ships are still anchored off Fort Monroe. A considerable number of coasting vessels passed in the Capes on Monday and yesterday, and came to anchor in the Roads, awaiting the change of the wind from east ward. The tall pole ejected last June
ere properly entertained by some of our citizens. The polite Spanish officers expressed themselves in strong terms of satisfaction with regard to the manner in which they were received. A large steamship passed out to Gen. yesterday. Several large ships are still anchored off Fort Monroe. A considerable number of coasting vessels passed in the Capes on Monday and yesterday, and came to anchor in the Roads, awaiting the change of the wind from east ward. The tall pole ejected last June by the Ecil-Everett party was taken down this morning, carried to one of the wharves and thrown overboard. It is, however, not thrown away as a worthless relic of a despot party. It will not be allowed to drift out to sea to roll upon the heaving ocean surges like the shattered main mast of some ill-fated bark wrecked by the restless power of wind and wave; although, as the banner of the flag once honored, but now disgraced, it might be well to let it thus disappear from sight to be riven a