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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: August 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 5 results.

Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 9
Letter from a Kentucky Union man.[from the Lexington (Ky.) Statesman.] Lexington, Ky Aug. 15, 1861. --I arrived in this city on last Monday, after several weeks' absence on a visit to the State of Virginia. When my return was known, I was invited by a large number of my fellow- citizens to address them upon the subject of the war. I declined to do so at first, because I was no candidate and did not intend to be, and I did not wish to thrust my humble opinion upon the community; however, I finally consented to speak, and, in my humble way, candidly gave my opinion as to the result of the existing war and the course Kentucky should pursue. The positions I assumed on the occasion have been greatly misrepresented, and I wish through the columns of your paper to define them. I do not favor the immediate secession of the State, nor am I for joining the North in the prosecution of this war of subjugation.--I stand now just where I stood for months, and where the Union pa
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Letter from a Kentucky Union man.[from the Lexington (Ky.) Statesman.] Lexington, Ky Aug. 15, 1861. --I arrived in this city on last Monday, after several weeks' absence on a visit to the State of Virginia. When my return was known, I was invited by a large number of my fellow- citizens to address them upon the subject of the war. I declined to do so at first, because I was no candidate and did not intend to be, and I did not wish to thrust my humble opinion upon the community; however, I finally consented to speak, and, in my humble way, candidly gave my opinion as to the result of the existing war and the course Kentucky should pursue. The positions I assumed on the occasion have been greatly misrepresented, and I wish through the columns of your paper to define them. I do not favor the immediate secession of the State, nor am I for joining the North in the prosecution of this war of subjugation.--I stand now just where I stood for months, and where the Union pa
been killed, and the war thus far began; and thousands and tens of thousands will yet fall long before a single State is subjugated. The great loss on both sides will, day by day, increase, and exasperate the hospitality between the two sections, until the difficulties, at first small, will become inseparable; and from the sources of eternal strife — with the death of each man that in this war is killed, the hope of reconciliation and reconstruction growsless. I say, stop the war, and let us have peace, and leave to Providence and to time to restore, if it be possible, the Union of all the States. Mr. Editor, for the utterance by a private citizen of such sentiments as these, I have been much abused from irresponsible sources. I suppose I should not complain; it is but a foretaste of that intolerance, and that all of us must suffer when the military occupation by the State is completed which has been begun by the establishment of two camps in this State. R. W. Hanson
been killed, and the war thus far began; and thousands and tens of thousands will yet fall long before a single State is subjugated. The great loss on both sides will, day by day, increase, and exasperate the hospitality between the two sections, until the difficulties, at first small, will become inseparable; and from the sources of eternal strife — with the death of each man that in this war is killed, the hope of reconciliation and reconstruction growsless. I say, stop the war, and let us have peace, and leave to Providence and to time to restore, if it be possible, the Union of all the States. Mr. Editor, for the utterance by a private citizen of such sentiments as these, I have been much abused from irresponsible sources. I suppose I should not complain; it is but a foretaste of that intolerance, and that all of us must suffer when the military occupation by the State is completed which has been begun by the establishment of two camps in this State. R. W. Hanson
August 15th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 9
Letter from a Kentucky Union man.[from the Lexington (Ky.) Statesman.] Lexington, Ky Aug. 15, 1861. --I arrived in this city on last Monday, after several weeks' absence on a visit to the State of Virginia. When my return was known, I was invited by a large number of my fellow- citizens to address them upon the subject of the war. I declined to do so at first, because I was no candidate and did not intend to be, and I did not wish to thrust my humble opinion upon the community; however, I finally consented to speak, and, in my humble way, candidly gave my opinion as to the result of the existing war and the course Kentucky should pursue. The positions I assumed on the occasion have been greatly misrepresented, and I wish through the columns of your paper to define them. I do not favor the immediate secession of the State, nor am I for joining the North in the prosecution of this war of subjugation.--I stand now just where I stood for months, and where the Union par