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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 2
evelation. The only lingering trace of the that ran such riot in its veins is the Spe which, a few years ago, number millions of votaries among the Puritan and, in this nineteenth century of boasted that and civilization, was as firmly believed is by them as ever witchcraft was by their . We have always thought that no better proof could be desired of the perfect ness of the pretensions of New England when learning and superior intelligence, and the inextinguishable fanaticism which in Puritan vains, than the widespread ef in spirit which prevailed a few pears ago throughout the free States, and which, for aught we know to the contrary, votaries there to this hour. A bolder supernation, a more lets shameless, disgusting imposture, was never palmed of soon barbarians than found its multitudes of willing duper among the people of New England. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, and all civilized Christendom, simply laughed at, but which was sw
New England (United States) (search for this): article 2
g madness, in their number and are almost incredible. No people those of New England in the fanaticize and bluis which characterized the extraordinary mania. The baleful inside infernal pit. If ever there was a hell is must have been New England dg the prevalence of witchcraft. It was that, at this day, not a vestigl the of its ravages, the madness of has given place to the imbecility of New England has swung from the of witchcraft to a condition w skepticism upon subjects t no better proof could be desired of the perfect ness of the pretensions of New England when learning and superior intelligence, and the inextinguishable fanaticismon barbarians than found its multitudes of willing duper among the people of New England. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, andith wide open, watering, hungry mouths, by those ly intelligent and educated New England, who affect to look down upon the tns militaries better than barbarians. We
France (France) (search for this): article 2
ng and superior intelligence, and the inextinguishable fanaticism which in Puritan vains, than the widespread ef in spirit which prevailed a few pears ago throughout the free States, and which, for aught we know to the contrary, votaries there to this hour. A bolder supernation, a more lets shameless, disgusting imposture, was never palmed of soon barbarians than found its multitudes of willing duper among the people of New England. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, and all civilized Christendom, simply laughed at, but which was swallowed whole, with wide open, watering, hungry mouths, by those ly intelligent and educated New England, who affect to look down upon the tns militaries better than barbarians. We was aware that curious passage have been re in the lives of such men as Evron, Samer. Johnedy, Poin, Goethe, Lord Casthe Sage, Bentenute Cellini, Bermadoten, the Napoleon, and others, and as each individual son of the Pilgrims is,
gland. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, and all civilized Christendom, simply laughed at, but which was swallowed whole, with wide open, watering, hungry mouths, by those ly intelligent and educated New England, who affect to look down upon the tns militaries better than barbarians. We was aware that curious passage have been re in the lives of such men as Evron, Samer. Johnedy, Poin, Goethe, Lord Casthe Sage, Bentenute Cellini, Bermadoten, the Napoleon, and others, and as each individual son of the Pilgrims is, in his own conceit, equal to any and all these personages combined, we are prepared to make all reasonable allowances for that union of moral unsoundness with intellectual power which demonstrates the proposition of Emerson, that "there is a crack in everything human," But the instances of hallucination in the great men to whom we have referred, were only of occasional occurrence, grow out of the excitement of great enterprises, an
Ralph Waldo Emerson (search for this): article 2
Moral epidemics. A library of very respectable size might be made up of historic and illustrations of the moral epidemics which, from time to time, have visited mankind. The remark of that expired to the reputation of a philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson, that "there is a crack everything human," may have been suggested by his own consciousness; but finds nevertheless in the general experiences of our race. The shallowness of the understanding the corruption of the heart, and the privacyidual son of the Pilgrims is, in his own conceit, equal to any and all these personages combined, we are prepared to make all reasonable allowances for that union of moral unsoundness with intellectual power which demonstrates the proposition of Emerson, that "there is a crack in everything human," But the instances of hallucination in the great men to whom we have referred, were only of occasional occurrence, grow out of the excitement of great enterprises, and did not exercise any permanent a
han found its multitudes of willing duper among the people of New England. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, and all civilized Christendom, simply laughed at, but which was swallowed whole, with wide open, watering, hungry mouths, by those ly intelligent and educated New England, who affect to look down upon the tns militaries better than barbarians. We was aware that curious passage have been re in the lives of such men as Evron, Samer. Johnedy, Poin, Goethe, Lord Casthe Sage, Bentenute Cellini, Bermadoten, the Napoleon, and others, and as each individual son of the Pilgrims is, in his own conceit, equal to any and all these personages combined, we are prepared to make all reasonable allowances for that union of moral unsoundness with intellectual power which demonstrates the proposition of Emerson, that "there is a crack in everything human," But the instances of hallucination in the great men to whom we have referred, were only of occasi
Casthe Sage (search for this): article 2
multitudes of willing duper among the people of New England. It was an absurdity which the learned man of England, France, Germany, and all civilized Christendom, simply laughed at, but which was swallowed whole, with wide open, watering, hungry mouths, by those ly intelligent and educated New England, who affect to look down upon the tns militaries better than barbarians. We was aware that curious passage have been re in the lives of such men as Evron, Samer. Johnedy, Poin, Goethe, Lord Casthe Sage, Bentenute Cellini, Bermadoten, the Napoleon, and others, and as each individual son of the Pilgrims is, in his own conceit, equal to any and all these personages combined, we are prepared to make all reasonable allowances for that union of moral unsoundness with intellectual power which demonstrates the proposition of Emerson, that "there is a crack in everything human," But the instances of hallucination in the great men to whom we have referred, were only of occasional occurren