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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
evertheless, he chooses to give the North what advantage he can by quoting Mr. Russell's anecdote, and saying "if it be true,"&c., knowing that with his admirers it will have the same effect as if it were true. This is the meanest act we ever knew of the Archbishop, and shows what men, with some reputation, for fairness, may descend to in maintaining a bad cause. It is passing strange that a learned and ardent Irishman like the Archbishop, who desires the separation of Ireland from Great Britain, should throw his influence in behalf of the coercion of the Southern people to an alliance with those whom they loathe, and the sovereign Southern States into a union to which they will never submit. It may, in a measure, be accounted for by the fact that the Arch bishop is an intimate friend of the arch-fiend Seward. It is not the first time that the route of the "devil's walk" was through a Bishop's palace. Again, whatever be the Archbishop's motive, it is certain that after his coe
Record, Archbishop Hughes' New York organ, publishes a correspondence between that famous ecclesiastical dignitary and Bishop Lynch, of Charleston, on the subject of the secession of the Southern States and the war. The correspondence is too long ford than logic. But it is, nevertheless, interesting to know on what side these religious dignitaries are arrayed. Bishop Lynch addresses a long letter to the Archbishop, and the latter replies in one of course equally long; for the Archbishop does not generally allow an adversary to exceed him in length of an argument, and, indeed, not often in ability. Bishop Lynch takes the Southern side. He reasons it very ably, presenting in strong light the injuries inflicted on the South, her concesittle which of the combatants destroys the other." Archbishop Hughes, in his reply, does not undertake to answer Bishop Lynch's reasoning upon the causes which have led to the war. He declares that he was a friend of peace until the war began,
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
ted on the South, her concessions, the failure of all efforts at redress, and the consummation of Northern tyranny in the sectional triumph by the election of Abraham Lincoln on the Chicago platform. He refers to the commercial interests of the North, the vast productive power of the South, and portrays the immense injury the NortSouth begun the war — that it had no right to secede or separate, no matter what its complaints, except in the mode provided by the Constitution. The election of Lincoln was not sufficient ground, he contends, since so many Southern Presidents had filled the Presidential chair. He denies the right of secession in a State more than a county or a town from a State. (He seems to have been a pupil of the profound Dr. Lincoln.) In short, he is an out-and-out Federalist — is against the cry of peace — for the vigorous prosecution of war; but declares that the North is not fighting for subjugation, but to bring back the seceded States to their organic condition<
in maintaining a bad cause. It is passing strange that a learned and ardent Irishman like the Archbishop, who desires the separation of Ireland from Great Britain, should throw his influence in behalf of the coercion of the Southern people to an alliance with those whom they loathe, and the sovereign Southern States into a union to which they will never submit. It may, in a measure, be accounted for by the fact that the Arch bishop is an intimate friend of the arch-fiend Seward. It is not the first time that the route of the "devil's walk" was through a Bishop's palace. Again, whatever be the Archbishop's motive, it is certain that after his coercion letter, Erastus. (ye rascal) Brooks would hardly attack his prerogative and property, in the New York Senate; and there can be no doubt that the Archbishop feels, now that he has espoused the Northern tyranny, vastly more secure than when a few years since appealing to the public against the persecution of that Know-Nothing wolf.
in maintaining a bad cause. It is passing strange that a learned and ardent Irishman like the Archbishop, who desires the separation of Ireland from Great Britain, should throw his influence in behalf of the coercion of the Southern people to an alliance with those whom they loathe, and the sovereign Southern States into a union to which they will never submit. It may, in a measure, be accounted for by the fact that the Arch bishop is an intimate friend of the arch-fiend Seward. It is not the first time that the route of the "devil's walk" was through a Bishop's palace. Again, whatever be the Archbishop's motive, it is certain that after his coercion letter, Erastus. (ye rascal) Brooks would hardly attack his prerogative and property, in the New York Senate; and there can be no doubt that the Archbishop feels, now that he has espoused the Northern tyranny, vastly more secure than when a few years since appealing to the public against the persecution of that Know-Nothing wolf.
may descend to in maintaining a bad cause. It is passing strange that a learned and ardent Irishman like the Archbishop, who desires the separation of Ireland from Great Britain, should throw his influence in behalf of the coercion of the Southern people to an alliance with those whom they loathe, and the sovereign Southern States into a union to which they will never submit. It may, in a measure, be accounted for by the fact that the Arch bishop is an intimate friend of the arch-fiend Seward. It is not the first time that the route of the "devil's walk" was through a Bishop's palace. Again, whatever be the Archbishop's motive, it is certain that after his coercion letter, Erastus. (ye rascal) Brooks would hardly attack his prerogative and property, in the New York Senate; and there can be no doubt that the Archbishop feels, now that he has espoused the Northern tyranny, vastly more secure than when a few years since appealing to the public against the persecution of that Know-N
Two Bishops --Pro and Con the War--The Metropolitan Record, Archbishop Hughes' New York organ, publishes a correspondence between that famous ecclesiastical dignitary and Bishop Lynch, of Charleston, on the subject of the secession of the Southern States and the war. The correspondence is too long for publication in our columns, and is devoted to a discussion of the merits of the issue which has been debated, ad infinitum until now there is no longer room or time for debate. It must be sr their muskets and bear the responsibility. Let them not send Irishmen to fight in their stead, and then stand looking on at the conflict, when, in their heart of hearts, they care little which of the combatants destroys the other." Archbishop Hughes, in his reply, does not undertake to answer Bishop Lynch's reasoning upon the causes which have led to the war. He declares that he was a friend of peace until the war began, but does not now dare to hope for peace until he can see some sol
It is marked by much ability. The Archbishop adds ingenuity to his essay, in the employment of which he is not over-scrupulous. For instance, he quotes from Mr. Russell the remark of some Southern men hostile to foreigners as an illustration of Southern feeling towards them. He confesses that the gentleman quoted by Mr. RusselMr. Russell is no true representative of the gentlemen it was his fortune to meet in the South. "But no matter," he says, "if it be true, it shews that for Irish and foreigners in general the South is nearly as unfriendly as the North can be."-- He has not the hardihood, even if it be true, to say that the South is as "unfriendly" as the Nonchisement, and even invaded the property and authority of the Bishop himself. But, nevertheless, he chooses to give the North what advantage he can by quoting Mr. Russell's anecdote, and saying "if it be true,"&c., knowing that with his admirers it will have the same effect as if it were true. This is the meanest act we ever kne