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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 11 total hits in 7 results.

Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 22
ughly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Se
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 22
ughly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Se
James T. Preston (search for this): article 22
Messrs, Editors: I see by a notice in your last paper that our old friend, Col. James T. Preston is "working like a beaver" to raise a regiment for the war. I hope he may succeed, and that right speedily, for I am fully satisfied that a man better qualified, both by education and talent, cannot be found in this whole region. Besides, from all I can learn, no man hereabouts has spent as much time or labored half as hard for the cause of the South since the beginning of the present difficulty. In fact, for four months past he has been speaking, talking, and working in the volunteer movement to the total neglect of his own private affairs. War (like law, medicine, surgery, engineering, surveying, &c.,) is conducted on certain settled rules and principles, which must be thoroughly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the
ughly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Se
ghly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Se
Hezekiah Scott (search for this): article 22
ghly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Se
March, 8 AD (search for this): article 22
ughly understood by every successful leader. The art of "attack" and "defence"--when to do the one or the other, and how to do so with the least possible loss and with the most destructive effect to the enemy — is a "gift" which but few men naturally possess; indeed, so few that they are not met with more than "once in a lifetime." Nor will this necessary preparation, of itself, accomplish much for a commander, unless accompanied by prominent traits of character — such as good old-fashioned "mother wit," bravery, and prudence. These, I believe, are all possessed by our friend in quantum sufficit--or, to speak in plain English, "enough to do,"--and I should have no hesitation in placing myself under his leadership in the day of battle. I have known Col. Presion from boyhood, and have ever found him kind-hearted, high-minded and honorable — none more so — and pronounce him to be one of the best field officers in South western Virginia. Yours, Scott. Abingdon, Sept. 3.<