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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Crooked River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
g that we were rapidly overhauling the ship, became alarmed, set fire to her and made a precipitate retreat in their boats. The Bartow then changed her course and attempted to cut off the boats; but were unable to do so, the Vandals making terrified speed over the water. During this time the two steamers outside fired up and made demonstration to run in, doubtless to protect and cover the retreat of their boats. The expedition returned to the city this morning, having left the East Pass, a little after sunrise. The Finland was in flames, lying with all sails set, on the flats off the mouth of Crooked River. A detachment of the Apalachicola Guards, obtained a boat from the steamer Wm. H. Young and by permission, went over to the burning ship to see if anything could be saved from her. The Master and crew of the Finland, as well as of the schooner New Plan, are no doubt prisoners, on board the blockade vessels. These are all the particulars we are enabled to give at present.
Appalachicola (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
Capture of the ship Finland by the Blockaders — the enemy compelled to abandon the ship — set fire to her and take to their boats. [From the Apalachicola Times, Aug. 28:] Yesterday afternoon, (the 27th) news reached this city (Apalachicola) from the East Pass, that the blockading steamer Montgomery, and another steamer, had entered the harbor and seized the ship Finland, lying at her anchorage about six miles from the bar. The enemy attempted to take the ship out, but did not succeed. Immediately on receipt of the news, the steamer Wm. H. Young, having in tow the privateer F. S. Bartow, with detachments from the Apalachicola Guards, Perry Artillery and Beauregard Rifles, under their respective commanders, proceeded down the bay, and arrived in sight of the Finland and the blockading vessels about daylight this morning. The Finland had all sail set, and was apparently beating out. The blockading steamers were lying outside the bar; about three miles from the East Pass Light
East River (New York, United States) (search for this): article 4
ire to her and take to their boats. [From the Apalachicola Times, Aug. 28:] Yesterday afternoon, (the 27th) news reached this city (Apalachicola) from the East Pass, that the blockading steamer Montgomery, and another steamer, had entered the harbor and seized the ship Finland, lying at her anchorage about six miles from aylight this morning. The Finland had all sail set, and was apparently beating out. The blockading steamers were lying outside the bar; about three miles from the East Pass Light. The schooner New Plan, Capt. John Genoa, captured at the same time with the Finland, was seen going from the ship towards the steamers. The enemy up and made demonstration to run in, doubtless to protect and cover the retreat of their boats. The expedition returned to the city this morning, having left the East Pass, a little after sunrise. The Finland was in flames, lying with all sails set, on the flats off the mouth of Crooked River. A detachment of the Apalachic
John Genoa (search for this): article 4
ws, the steamer Wm. H. Young, having in tow the privateer F. S. Bartow, with detachments from the Apalachicola Guards, Perry Artillery and Beauregard Rifles, under their respective commanders, proceeded down the bay, and arrived in sight of the Finland and the blockading vessels about daylight this morning. The Finland had all sail set, and was apparently beating out. The blockading steamers were lying outside the bar; about three miles from the East Pass Light. The schooner New Plan, Capt. John Genoa, captured at the same time with the Finland, was seen going from the ship towards the steamers. The enemy finding that we were rapidly overhauling the ship, became alarmed, set fire to her and made a precipitate retreat in their boats. The Bartow then changed her course and attempted to cut off the boats; but were unable to do so, the Vandals making terrified speed over the water. During this time the two steamers outside fired up and made demonstration to run in, doubtless to pr
August 28th (search for this): article 4
Capture of the ship Finland by the Blockaders — the enemy compelled to abandon the ship — set fire to her and take to their boats. [From the Apalachicola Times, Aug. 28:] Yesterday afternoon, (the 27th) news reached this city (Apalachicola) from the East Pass, that the blockading steamer Montgomery, and another steamer, had entered the harbor and seized the ship Finland, lying at her anchorage about six miles from the bar. The enemy attempted to take the ship out, but did not succeed. Immediately on receipt of the news, the steamer Wm. H. Young, having in tow the privateer F. S. Bartow, with detachments from the Apalachicola Guards, Perry Artillery and Beauregard Rifles, under their respective commanders, proceeded down the bay, and arrived in sight of the Finland and the blockading vessels about daylight this morning. The Finland had all sail set, and was apparently beating out. The blockading steamers were lying outside the bar; about three miles from the East Pass Light