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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 6 results.

Benjamin McCulloch (search for this): article 6
the news we get is what is picked up from persons traveling through the country; Gen. Fremont is making formidable arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening last. I don't understand it. It is generally believed that the run from that fight is confirmatory of the great and signal defeat of Lincoln's army, and Siegel's flight at thirty miles per day made, it impossible for his enemy to catch him. If the Confederates had left the field, the wounded would have been left at the mercy of wolves and dogs, and therefore it was necessary to remain to render the duty of Christiana to the dead, dying and wounded. McCulloch took 3,500 stand of arms, ammunition for a year's supply, and sugar and coffee and other provisions.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 6
the news we get is what is picked up from persons traveling through the country; Gen. Fremont is making formidable arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening last. I don't understand it. It is generally believed that the run from that fight is confirmatory of the great and signal defeat of Lincoln's army, and Siegel's flight at thirty miles per day made, it impossible for his enemy to catch him. If the Confederates had left the field, the wounded would have been left at the mercy of wolves and dogs, and therefore it was necessary to remain to render the duty of Christiana to the dead, dying and wounded. McCulloch took 3,500 stand of arms, ammunition for a year's supply, and sugar and coffee and other provisions.
able arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening last. I don't understand it. It is generally believed that the run from that fight is confirmatory of the great and signal defeat of Lincoln's army, and Siegel's flight at thirty milm that fight is confirmatory of the great and signal defeat of Lincoln's army, and Siegel's flight at thirty miles per day made, it impossible for his enemy to catch him. If the Confederates had left the field, the wounded would have been left at the mercy of wolves and dogs, and therefore it was necessary to remain to render the duty of Christiana to the dead, dying and wounded. McCulloch took 3,500 stand of arms, ammunition for a year's supply, and sugar and coffee and other provisions.
From St. Louis. --Siegel Dismissed.--The Louisville Courier prints the following extract from a private letter from St. Louis, dated Aug. 24, 1861; Things are as bad as ever here. Men are being arrested daily, judged and consigned to the House of Labor, and imprisoned. Christian Pulls was arrested this morning and sentenced to thirty days labor. Brownlee is preparing to leave with his family, under the sentence to leave the State in four days. The New York News is still coming, but it will be stopped. The Louisville Courier is cut off. All the news we get is what is picked up from persons traveling through the country; Gen. Fremont is making formidable arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening las
Things are as bad as ever here. Men are being arrested daily, judged and consigned to the House of Labor, and imprisoned. Christian Pulls was arrested this morning and sentenced to thirty days labor. Brownlee is preparing to leave with his family, under the sentence to leave the State in four days. The New York News is still coming, but it will be stopped. The Louisville Courier is cut off. All the news we get is what is picked up from persons traveling through the country; Gen. Fremont is making formidable arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening last. I don't understand it. It is generally believed that the run from that fight is confirmatory of the great and signal defeat of Lincoln's army, and Siegel
August 24th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
From St. Louis. --Siegel Dismissed.--The Louisville Courier prints the following extract from a private letter from St. Louis, dated Aug. 24, 1861; Things are as bad as ever here. Men are being arrested daily, judged and consigned to the House of Labor, and imprisoned. Christian Pulls was arrested this morning and sentenced to thirty days labor. Brownlee is preparing to leave with his family, under the sentence to leave the State in four days. The New York News is still coming, but it will be stopped. The Louisville Courier is cut off. All the news we get is what is picked up from persons traveling through the country; Gen. Fremont is making formidable arrangements around this city, digging entrenchments and building fortifications around the Fair Grounds and the Lafayette Park, the latter eternallly ruined, the grove killed and the trees ruined. The Democrat of this morning says that Siegel and his staff were mustered out of service on Thursday evening las