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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 3 results.

Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 8
Governor of Ohio, the Prince of Swine, in a recent Proclamation to his fatted constituency, appealing to them to fill up the twenty nine skeleton regiments now lingering for completion in that State says: "The late disaster at Manassas, serious as it was in many respects to the rebels, has added to their audacity and insolence. Encouraged by apparent success, they have augmented their forces and enhanced the necessity for vigilance and power at Washington, in Western Virginia and in Missouri." This is one of the best joke of the season.--One could hardly imagine it possible that a swineherd could display so lively a wit. But we see that he is also tragic. In the same proclamation he grunts a terrible threat at the rebels, as follows: "The only condition upon which negation can be tolerated is the complete surrender of the rebels to the national government, and an unqualified return of their allegiance to its supreme authority." The "great boar of Ardennes" could
Ardennes (France) (search for this): article 8
t Proclamation to his fatted constituency, appealing to them to fill up the twenty nine skeleton regiments now lingering for completion in that State says: "The late disaster at Manassas, serious as it was in many respects to the rebels, has added to their audacity and insolence. Encouraged by apparent success, they have augmented their forces and enhanced the necessity for vigilance and power at Washington, in Western Virginia and in Missouri." This is one of the best joke of the season.--One could hardly imagine it possible that a swineherd could display so lively a wit. But we see that he is also tragic. In the same proclamation he grunts a terrible threat at the rebels, as follows: "The only condition upon which negation can be tolerated is the complete surrender of the rebels to the national government, and an unqualified return of their allegiance to its supreme authority." The "great boar of Ardennes" could hardly have assumed a more ferocious attitude.
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
nny. --The great Governor of Ohio, the Prince of Swine, in a recent Proclamation to his fatted constituency, appealing to them to fill up the twenty nine skeleton regiments now lingering for completion in that State says: "The late disaster at Manassas, serious as it was in many respects to the rebels, has added to their audacity and insolence. Encouraged by apparent success, they have augmented their forces and enhanced the necessity for vigilance and power at Washington, in Western Virginia and in Missouri." This is one of the best joke of the season.--One could hardly imagine it possible that a swineherd could display so lively a wit. But we see that he is also tragic. In the same proclamation he grunts a terrible threat at the rebels, as follows: "The only condition upon which negation can be tolerated is the complete surrender of the rebels to the national government, and an unqualified return of their allegiance to its supreme authority." The "great boa