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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 10, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 4
ements, and a prisoner who was brought in this morning says the loss was above fifty.--This prisoner was an officer, belonging to one of the Massachusetts regiments. He says the firing occasioned great consternation in Washington, and was followed by a perfect stampede from the city. One hundred and three shots were sent across the river, and consisted of bombs, round shot and spherical case. The last that was seen of the Federals they were in full retreat towards Washington. The Massachusetts officer says that several regiments were sent immediately up to support those fired on, but nothing has been seen of them. He also says that there are thirty thousand men near Alexandria, but that they are maintained on this side of the river with great difficulty. They live in perfect terror and under constant apprehension of an attack. To-night I have nothing to report, except that every thing is quiet. Our men patchily bide their time and make no complaint at the delay imposed
Somersworth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 4
Everything here is quiet and almost as little is known of the state of affairs on the Potomac as in Richmond. There is no excitement, no anxiety, and one can hardly imagine himself so close to two opposing armies. The storm which raged on yesterday has given place to fair weather, and now the air is cool and pleasant, and the day as delightful as heart could wish. A few moments ago I met an officer of the Washington Artillery, who was engaged in the little affair of Wednesday above Great Falls. Last week the expedition was planned to meet a movement of the enemy. The Artillery took position on Tuesday, and early Wednesday morning the Federals came up opposite. They were preparing to camp when first fired on, and after the first round brought their artillery into position for defence. Two or three shot in their midst caused great consternation, and they fled in every direction, leaving their battery before firing a single gun. A large body of the Federals ran into a large bu
e firing occasioned great consternation in Washington, and was followed by a perfect stampede from the city. One hundred and three shots were sent across the river, and consisted of bombs, round shot and spherical case. The last that was seen of the Federals they were in full retreat towards Washington. The Massachusetts officer says that several regiments were sent immediately up to support those fired on, but nothing has been seen of them. He also says that there are thirty thousand men near Alexandria, but that they are maintained on this side of the river with great difficulty. They live in perfect terror and under constant apprehension of an attack. To-night I have nothing to report, except that every thing is quiet. Our men patchily bide their time and make no complaint at the delay imposed upon them. They have great confidence in and great respect for Gen. Johnston, and an ardent love for Gen. Beau regard. Both Generals have won the hearts of their men. G. M.
A. Sydney Johnston (search for this): article 4
e firing occasioned great consternation in Washington, and was followed by a perfect stampede from the city. One hundred and three shots were sent across the river, and consisted of bombs, round shot and spherical case. The last that was seen of the Federals they were in full retreat towards Washington. The Massachusetts officer says that several regiments were sent immediately up to support those fired on, but nothing has been seen of them. He also says that there are thirty thousand men near Alexandria, but that they are maintained on this side of the river with great difficulty. They live in perfect terror and under constant apprehension of an attack. To-night I have nothing to report, except that every thing is quiet. Our men patchily bide their time and make no complaint at the delay imposed upon them. They have great confidence in and great respect for Gen. Johnston, and an ardent love for Gen. Beau regard. Both Generals have won the hearts of their men. G. M.
September 6th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
Fairfax C. H., September 6, 1861. I left Manassas Junction early this morning, and after a pleasant ride of four hours arrived at this place. Everything here is quiet and almost as little is known of the state of affairs on the Potomac as in Richmond. There is no excitement, no anxiety, and one can hardly imagine himself so close to two opposing armies. The storm which raged on yesterday has given place to fair weather, and now the air is cool and pleasant, and the day as delightful as heart could wish. A few moments ago I met an officer of the Washington Artillery, who was engaged in the little affair of Wednesday above Great Falls. Last week the expedition was planned to meet a movement of the enemy. The Artillery took position on Tuesday, and early Wednesday morning the Federals came up opposite. They were preparing to camp when first fired on, and after the first round brought their artillery into position for defence. Two or three shot in their midst caused