hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 74 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 32 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
B. Magoffin 15 1 Browse Search
Fremont 15 1 Browse Search
Siegel 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 13 1 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Beauregard 11 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 4 results.

Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 2
he Indian battles, in Florida, he was literally riddled with rifle balls. The surgeons told him to prepare for death, frankly informed him that his case was hopeless. He told them that they knew nothing about it, that he intended to recover, and he did recover. Again at Molino del Rey, then a captain, in leading his men to take a redoubt, as he approached it, in advance, he looked round to see how his men were behaving. He saw every one of them, but two or three, hors du combat, and fell on the spot himself pierced by so many balls that it would be a severe tax upon credulity to enumerate his wounds. Again the surgeons told him he must die, and again he told them he would "see them d — d first." Three our four months after, he left the City of Mexico a ghastly spectacle, and was conveyed to Vera Cruz on a litter, unable to bear any other mode of conveyance. He reached home alive, however, recovered and survives all his desperate wounds, a vigorous denial of medical prescience.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 2
A Charmed life. --The N. O. Delta relates the subjoined incidents in the life of General Wm. H. T. Walker, of Georgia, late a Colonel in the U. S. Army, who is now in command of a brigade of Louisianians in the Confederate service: Gen. Walker is not only respected among military men for his abilities and courage, but is noted for escaping death upon two occasions, where escape was hardly anything short of a miracle. In one of the Indian battles, in Florida, he was literally riddled with rifle balls. The surgeons told him to prepare for death, frankly informed him that his case was hopeless. He told them that they knew nothing about it, that he intended to recover, and he did recover. Again at Molino del Rey, then a captain, in leading his men to take a redoubt, as he approached it, in advance, he looked round to see how his men were behaving. He saw every one of them, but two or three, hors du combat, and fell on the spot himself pierced by so many balls that it would
rvice: Gen. Walker is not only respected among military men for his abilities and courage, but is noted for escaping death upon two occasions, where escape was hardly anything short of a miracle. In one of the Indian battles, in Florida, he was literally riddled with rifle balls. The surgeons told him to prepare for death, frankly informed him that his case was hopeless. He told them that they knew nothing about it, that he intended to recover, and he did recover. Again at Molino del Rey, then a captain, in leading his men to take a redoubt, as he approached it, in advance, he looked round to see how his men were behaving. He saw every one of them, but two or three, hors du combat, and fell on the spot himself pierced by so many balls that it would be a severe tax upon credulity to enumerate his wounds. Again the surgeons told him he must die, and again he told them he would "see them d — d first." Three our four months after, he left the City of Mexico a ghastly spectacle,
William H. T. Walker (search for this): article 2
A Charmed life. --The N. O. Delta relates the subjoined incidents in the life of General Wm. H. T. Walker, of Georgia, late a Colonel in the U. S. Army, who is now in command of a brigade of Louisianians in the Confederate service: Gen. Walker is not only respected among military men for his abilities and courage, but is noted for escaping death upon two occasions, where escape was hardly anything short of a miracle. In one of the Indian battles, in Florida, he was literally riddled Gen. Walker is not only respected among military men for his abilities and courage, but is noted for escaping death upon two occasions, where escape was hardly anything short of a miracle. In one of the Indian battles, in Florida, he was literally riddled with rifle balls. The surgeons told him to prepare for death, frankly informed him that his case was hopeless. He told them that they knew nothing about it, that he intended to recover, and he did recover. Again at Molino del Rey, then a captain, in leading his men to take a redoubt, as he approached it, in advance, he looked round to see how his men were behaving. He saw every one of them, but two or three, hors du combat, and fell on the spot himself pierced by so many balls that it would