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United States (United States) (search for this): article 20
egislature by Gen. (?) J. B. Husson, a large, rather imposing looking man, but an arrant coward, from Clark, to punish rebellion. The telegraph has already turnished brief outliue of its provisions, which declare it felony to wage war on the United States, to enlist with troops for the Confederates, or induce others to enlist or even to join or parade with a company with the intent of joining the Confederates; and the penalty is from one to ten years imprisonment. Any invasion of Kentucky by rust they are brothers in that heavenly land, where there are no conflicts and struggles, and where there is no death. Our defences after the war. The Mobile Advertiser observes that as soon as the war is over the Government of the Confederate States will commence the work of establishing a cordon of strongly fortified posts all along our Northern frontier, to be garrisoned by our standing army. For several and sufficient reasons, we desire that Kentucky should belong to this Confedera
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 20
lition steamer Massachusetts, to proceed with his fleet to shell out the Island to-day! Thus the Captain has been saved all the fun and glory which he had expected to derive from such an explo it. Speculating in Kentucky. Several parties of gentlemen from Mississippi passed through this city yesterday on their way to Kentucky, which State now furnishes fine opportunities for speculating in a variety of ways. A large number of adventurers are now going in that direction by way of Knoxville and Nashville. Either mules or Yankees is understood to be their specialty. The Struggle in Kansas. The Liberty (Mo.) Tribune has a letter from Colunel John T. Hughes, of the Confederate Army, which is issued in an extra, reporting that a few days ago the Secession forces drove General Lane and his command into Kansus, with twelve killed, thirty or forty wounded, and thirty-five taken prisoners. He states that but two or three were killed and sixteen wounded on the Southern side.
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 20
garrisoned by our standing army. For several and sufficient reasons, we desire that Kentucky should belong to this Confederacy, as she certainly will. One of these reasons is, that our Government may have the privilege of building a great and impregnable fortress on the banks of the Ohio, just opposite Cincinnati, with a hundred big columblads on its ramparts, trained point-blank on this abolition porkopolia. Thus we would have an "under hold" on the North unless it choose to move its "Queen City" to a safer neighborhood. Any time that the North "stole a nigger," committed any act of aggression, or "kicked up any ruction," all our Government would have to do would be to notify the Northern Government that on such a day the commander of our anti-Cincinnati gibraltar would send a cartel to the porkopolitans giving them so many hours to remove their women, children and non-combatants, for down would come Cincinnati at the expiration of the time. If this power-supported menace did no
West Indies (search for this): article 20
, but more probably by agreement already made) so long as England refrains from recognizing our Confederacy?" It is a deep laid scheme, and one which will tend more to weakon us and protract the war than any other that could have been devised. But establish the precedent of a single shipment of cotton, (and that, too, from South Carolina,) as consistent with our interest or position, and every port and inlet will send out its ships and schooners loaded with cotton for Europe or the West Indies, (thence to be re-shipped,) or even to New York itself. Is it inst, is it honest, is it true to ourselves, that while the best blood of our country is being poured out in defence of our rights, and there are thousands of auxious hearts at home trombling for the safety of their sons and brothers in Virginia; we should, by supplying our enemy's walits, for cotion, protract the war and the sufferings of our brave soldiers? Another, in the Charleston Mercury, (not concurred in by
Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 20
ulam. From our depleted mails we gather below what is most interesting: The Threatesed invasion. The boast of the Federalists weigh little upon the mind of Southern people. The Hatleras affair was the source of but a momentary excitement, and served more as a benefit than a disadvantage. It was the signal for the note of preparation to be sounded; the "immortal" Butler, should he over have the courage to carry on his impending programme, may prepare for a glorious upset. The Charlotte (N. C.) Democrat remarks briefly: "If old Butler is ever caught on the soil of North or South Carolina, we hope he willnever be heard from as a prisoner. He has already stolen 900 negroes, besides burning houses and destroying farms, and we hope the day is not far distant when he will be furnished with his farm in the South four by feent in size. Suspicious Movements about the North Carolina coast. On Saturday afternoon, says the Wilmington Journal, of Monday, a bark was seen
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 20
Island and Connecticut were off the Chandeleurs two weeks ago, and the sloop-of-war Freble, menuting nine guns, was also there. They frequently recelved New Orleans papers, and seemed to be well posted up. Their intention was to fortify Ship Island so as to command the pass and run their gun-boats into the lake, and thus cut off the mail boats and all commenication between New Orleans and Mobile. Important from the Soute — Navai engagement. The following dispatch, by the Balize e cutter beyond reach, returned and followed the Water Witch as far as the bar. [Signed,] W. B. Robertson, Captain Artillery, Comd'g. Just in time to Miss the fun. The New Orleans Ficayune, of Saturday, says that the evacuation of Ship Island by our forces, which has already been mentioned, proves to have been just in time, as we learn from good authority that it was the intention of Captain Smith, of the Abolition steamer Massachusetts, to proceed with his fleet to shell out the I
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 20
ation to be sounded; the "immortal" Butler, should he over have the courage to carry on his impending programme, may prepare for a glorious upset. The Charlotte (N. C.) Democrat remarks briefly: "If old Butler is ever caught on the soil of North or South Carolina, we hope he willnever be heard from as a prisoner. He has already stolen 900 negroes, besides burning houses and destroying farms, and we hope the day is not far distant when he will be furnished with his farm in the South four by feent in size. Suspicious Movements about the North Carolina coast. On Saturday afternoon, says the Wilmington Journal, of Monday, a bark was seen from Camp Wvatt beating along the coast in a southwesterly direction, the wind being from the S. W.; and about 10½ o'clock at night, when opposite a point some two miles south of the camp, she sent up a rocket; She appeared to be making for Bald Head, and may have since come over the main bar. She kept close in, but not close enough to
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 20
the maseachusette, and was offered by Capt. Smith, of that vessel, to remain, if he thought proper, as his provisions ashore were getting short. Movements of the enemy Unout the Moute of the Mississippi. The enemy has already erected nine butteries on the north end of the Chandeleur Island, inside, and abreast of the light. They were expecting lumber every day to build houses and a hospital there, and 12,000 men were soon expected, to be divided on the islands. The steamers Rhode Island and Connecticut were off the Chandeleurs two weeks ago, and the sloop-of-war Freble, menuting nine guns, was also there. They frequently recelved New Orleans papers, and seemed to be well posted up. Their intention was to fortify Ship Island so as to command the pass and run their gun-boats into the lake, and thus cut off the mail boats and all commenication between New Orleans and Mobile. Important from the Soute — Navai engagement. The following dispatch, by the Balize T
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 20
the Soute — Navai engagement. The following dispatch, by the Balize Telegraph line, from Fort Jackson to Major Gen. Twigga, appears in the N. O. Picayune, of Saturday: Fort Jackson, September 21, 1861. Major General D. E. Twiggs: Mr. Fulda, the telegraphic operator at the head of the passes, arrived here this morning from that point. He reports an engagement between the C. S. steamer Ivy and the U. S. steamer Water Witch, without injury to the Ivy. The Ivy was down the South Pass when she discovered the Water Witch. She came out of the pass taking the C. S. cutter Pickens in tow, and proceeded up the river. In the meantime the Water Witch came up the pass, directing a constant fire of solid shot and shells at the shores, apparently feeling for masked batteries. Arriving at the telegraph station, she sent a boat ashore and took away their battery and other instruments.--After visiting the light-house, opposite that place, she again proceeded to sea through the
Jefferson (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 20
d his reputed firmness and decisiveress or character will compare favorably with the hermitage hero. He has already assumed command, and. with the valuable aid offered him by General Folk, will soon become familiar with the detail of our army. As soon as he shall have his campaign programme. ware, as their day of enemy beat hand. retribution will be near Seizure of guns and equipments in Hentucky. On Wednesday night, says the Clarksville Jeffersonian, the sherill of Jefferson county, Ky., captured the guns and equipments of the Kentucky Rifles, a regularly organized company of the State Guards, under Captain McGill. The cause for the perpetration of this outrage we are unable to state. A Captive Sailon set adrift after a long Imprisonment by the enemy. The N. O. Picayune. of Saturday, learns by a sailor, Mr. Fred. Johnson, that the fishing schooner Achilles was captured on the morning of the 16th of June last, near Chandeleur light, by the Lincoln steamer
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