hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 40 0 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
William H. Seward 18 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 18 0 Browse Search
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Billy Mulligan 14 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
France (France) 12 0 Browse Search
James H. Burnam 12 0 Browse Search
J. M. Price 11 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 35 total hits in 20 results.

1 2
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 15
of some happiness, and much pain. The baby was a wee bit of a thing, dressed in white, very quiet, and, during the ceremony, rolled his big black eyes around in wonder at the strange scene. Dr. James A Harrold officiated, Rev. Mr. Cameron, of Maryland, stood as god-father, and the little boy was christened Arthur de Beauregard. The scene was an interesting one, and was a pleasing relief to the routine of our daily life. Baby bears the honors of his new name very quietly, and crows all day fch is acknowledged to be the finest in the service. It is on a hillside close by this village, and on the Alexandria turnpike, immediately opposite the headquarters of Gen. Johnston. Our party consisted of Mrs. H. and two daughters, Mrs. M, of Maryland, two Misses G., of New Orleans, and a few gentlemen connected with the army. We were welcomed very heartily by Col. Fry, who showed us around the encampment, which looked as neat and prim as some lady's parlor. Since Dr. Harrold was appointed
United States (United States) (search for this): article 15
ted in the class of 1854. His first commission in the United States army was as Brevet Second Lieutenant in the mounted rifles, and was dated July 1st, 1854. On the 20th of December, 1855, he received a commission as First Lieutenant in the First Regiment of Cavalry, and was afterwards breveted a Captain, after seven years service in the army. This latter rank he held at the time of his resignation to join in the defence of his native State. He immediately entered the service of the Confederate States, was made Colonel of the First Mounted Regiment from Virginia, and a short time since was promoted to a Brigadier-Generalcy, and assigned to the command of cavalry. The appearance of Gen. Stuart is very striking and attracts general attention. Imagine strong, athletic frame, something over six feet in height, of almost perfect mould; a head covered with dark brown hair, heavy moustache and whiskers, which hide completely the lower portion of a pleasant face; I countenance that ca
Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): article 15
a pleasant face; I countenance that can be called handsome, strongly marked by good nature and a genial expression, and deep blue eyes, from which beams the youthful ardor and high spirits of the man. Decisive and prompt in action, his step has the firm tread and at the same time the elasticity of an athlete. An excellent horseman, he shows off to great advantage in the saddle, and rides with a grace that I have never seen excelled except by Captain Nolan, who was killed at the battle of Balaklava during Lord Cordigan's famous charge. Having that clan necessary to cope with a powerful enemy, and cunning enough to frustrate any strategas, he makes an admirable outpost commander, to which position he has lately been assigned. For some months Gen. Stuart has been in active service, and has never yet been caught napping, or failed in any plan he has attempted. At Munson's hill he slept within 800 yards of the enemy, accompanied by Capt. Rosser, of the Washington Artillery, an officer
ern army. It is a pity, however, that such a noble officer should be a constant mark to Yankee bullets, and that his valuable life should be imperiled by his own reckless daring. Such is a slight pen and ink sketch of the man who at the age of twenty-eight has been made a Brigadier in the Confederate Army, and has been assigned to its most important command. If I do not have something further to record of him before many weeks, it will greatly surprise me. I am sorry to learn that Capt. Tanney, of the 6th Louisiana regiment, was accidentally shot and instantly killed a day or two ago. The circumstances, as nearly as I can learn them, are these: There was a disturbance in his company, which he endeavored to quiet, and in doing so came in personal contact with the men. Drawing a revolver, he struck one of them over the head with the but, and as the same instant the pistol exploded, sending a bullet through his heart, killing him instantly. This unfortunate and much-to-be-regrett
ain Nolan, who was killed at the battle of Balaklava during Lord Cordigan's famous charge. Having that clan necessary to cope with a powerful enemy, and cunning enough to frustrate any strategas, he makes an admirable outpost commander, to which position he has lately been assigned. For some months Gen. Stuart has been in active service, and has never yet been caught napping, or failed in any plan he has attempted. At Munson's hill he slept within 800 yards of the enemy, accompanied by Capt. Rosser, of the Washington Artillery, an officer so similar in characteristics that one description might answer for both, watchful as a tiger, and as quick to spring from his covert at the approach of his prey. He is Nepoleonic in his ideas of battles, and believes in rapid, decisive, and vigorous charges; in routing the enemy at one point to-day, and to-morrow at mother, miles distant. Ignoring entirely all unnecessary military display, he believes in work, and would fight as well on three ro
s, which hide completely the lower portion of a pleasant face; I countenance that can be called handsome, strongly marked by good nature and a genial expression, and deep blue eyes, from which beams the youthful ardor and high spirits of the man. Decisive and prompt in action, his step has the firm tread and at the same time the elasticity of an athlete. An excellent horseman, he shows off to great advantage in the saddle, and rides with a grace that I have never seen excelled except by Captain Nolan, who was killed at the battle of Balaklava during Lord Cordigan's famous charge. Having that clan necessary to cope with a powerful enemy, and cunning enough to frustrate any strategas, he makes an admirable outpost commander, to which position he has lately been assigned. For some months Gen. Stuart has been in active service, and has never yet been caught napping, or failed in any plan he has attempted. At Munson's hill he slept within 800 yards of the enemy, accompanied by Capt. Ro
Arthur Beauregard (search for this): article 15
the inner chambers of the heart. It was not difficult to read the secrets laid away in store-house of memory, or to fancy the story of her life — a life of disappointed ambition, of some happiness, and much pain. The baby was a wee bit of a thing, dressed in white, very quiet, and, during the ceremony, rolled his big black eyes around in wonder at the strange scene. Dr. James A Harrold officiated, Rev. Mr. Cameron, of Maryland, stood as god-father, and the little boy was christened Arthur de Beauregard. The scene was an interesting one, and was a pleasing relief to the routine of our daily life. Baby bears the honors of his new name very quietly, and crows all day from his couch on the balcony, sucking a gold pencil, the sponsorial gift of his god-father, while we, like old babitue at the spring, who know as little about tending babies as of calculating an eclipse, smoke our cigars beside him, and watch his infant motions as if he belonged to us all. There is nothing new in t
Francis L. Smith (search for this): article 15
assembled by the marquee, and listened with bowed, uncovered heads to prayers read by Dr. Harrold. Soon after comes "taps," and the lights are extinguished. I must correct an unintentional error in my last letter, in which I spoke of Brigadier Gen. Smith, when I was perfectly aware that he was a General, and commanded a corps of the "army of the Potomac." The Commander-in-Chief is General Johnston; Gen. Beauregard commands the first corps and Gen. Smith the second. My error was a slip of quee, and listened with bowed, uncovered heads to prayers read by Dr. Harrold. Soon after comes "taps," and the lights are extinguished. I must correct an unintentional error in my last letter, in which I spoke of Brigadier Gen. Smith, when I was perfectly aware that he was a General, and commanded a corps of the "army of the Potomac." The Commander-in-Chief is General Johnston; Gen. Beauregard commands the first corps and Gen. Smith the second. My error was a slip of the pen. Bohemian.
ive face in mental angles, and read the evident marks of sorrow indicated on its surface and gaze thro' the cold eyes into the inner chambers of the heart. It was not difficult to read the secrets laid away in store-house of memory, or to fancy the story of her life — a life of disappointed ambition, of some happiness, and much pain. The baby was a wee bit of a thing, dressed in white, very quiet, and, during the ceremony, rolled his big black eyes around in wonder at the strange scene. Dr. James A Harrold officiated, Rev. Mr. Cameron, of Maryland, stood as god-father, and the little boy was christened Arthur de Beauregard. The scene was an interesting one, and was a pleasing relief to the routine of our daily life. Baby bears the honors of his new name very quietly, and crows all day from his couch on the balcony, sucking a gold pencil, the sponsorial gift of his god-father, while we, like old babitue at the spring, who know as little about tending babies as of calculating an ec
J. E. B. Stuart (search for this): article 15
of the Potomac.[our own correspondent.] Fairfax, Oct. 5, 1861 A few days ago the fact was announced that Colonel J. E. B. Stuart, of the First Virginia Cavalry Regiment, had been promoted to a Brigadier-General, and that he had been assigned to the command of the advance, the most important post of the army. Considering this, a few words about Gen. Stuart may not be amiss. He was born in Partrick county, Va. in 1833, and is now but twenty-eight years of age.--He was appointed a cadetshort time since was promoted to a Brigadier-Generalcy, and assigned to the command of cavalry. The appearance of Gen. Stuart is very striking and attracts general attention. Imagine strong, athletic frame, something over six feet in height, ony strategas, he makes an admirable outpost commander, to which position he has lately been assigned. For some months Gen. Stuart has been in active service, and has never yet been caught napping, or failed in any plan he has attempted. At Munson'
1 2