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George Fitzhugh (search for this): article 2
[written for a forthcoming number of De Bow's Review.]borrowing at home and borrowing abroad — the cotton loan.by George Fitzhugh. If to carry on the war we were to borrow in England two hundred and fifty millions of dollars, at the proposed rate of interest, principal redeemable in sixty years, we should in that time pay to our English creditors, in way of interest, more than one thousand millions of dollars; besides paying back the principal. One thousand millions of dollars would thus be transferred from our Confederacy to England. We should be that much the poorer, and England that much the wealthier, by the operation. If we borrow that amount from our own citizens, we should save in sixty years one thousand millions, and the nation in the aggregate be not one cent the loser or the poorer for the loan. All interest is but taxation. In the first case the tax collected would go to foreigners and reduce to that amount our national wealth; in the latter case, it wou
[written for a forthcoming number of De Bow's Review.]borrowing at home and borrowing abroad — the cotton loan.by George Fitzhugh. If to carry on the war we were to borrow in England two hundred and fifty millions of dollars, at the proposed rate of interest, principal redeemable in sixty years, we should in that time pay to our English creditors, in way of interest, more than one thousand millions of dollars; besides paying back the principal. One thousand millions of dollars would thus be transferred from our Confederacy to England. We should be that much the poorer, and England that much the wealthier, by the operation. If we borrow that amount from our own citizens, we should save in sixty years one thousand millions, and the nation in the aggregate be not one cent the loser or the poorer for the loan. All interest is but taxation. In the first case the tax collected would go to foreigners and reduce to that amount our national wealth; in the latter case, it woul
ursuits. We should have added that wealthy capitalists residing at home do much to relieve the distresses of the poor by private charity, and still more by payment of poor rates It is true, that both private and public charity are but a return to the poor of part of their earnings, for the laboring class in realit, creates all values, supports the poor, supports the Government, and creates the fund from which both public and private charity are dispensed. If we become indebted to England, her capitalists will dispense in public and private charity in England the hard earnings of American labor. The cotton loan, in keeping capital at home, will tend far to keep the earnings of labor at home, and thus provide a fund to give employment and good wages to the laboring poor, and from which to distribute charitable relief to those who need and deserve it. The credit of a new Government just starting into life is as delicate and as sensitive as the reputation of woman, and sh