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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 823 total hits in 406 results.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
s a month, or, in other words, for nothing, are genuine patriots.--They, noble spirits, whose equals the world never saw before, are genuine patriots, whose master passion is country, not self; worthy sons, brothers, and husbands of the truest and bravest women in the world, worthy to lay the foundations of the best and grandest Government in all the earth. We do not wish to be misunderstood. We detest and abhor the radicalism and red republicanism that has just shown us in the old United States how close akin they are to the most detestable Despotism. We trust that this new Government of ours will be a genuine representative Republic, not a Democracy; and no better model for each State in it could be found than the old Constitution of Virginia. This thing of letting everybody vote for everything is the source of all our present woes. Especially in the army must the gradations of rank be distinct and well defined, and the power of authority be supreme. We do not even advocat
Alexander Hamilton (search for this): article 1
ecause the same man cannot discharge with efficiency the duties of two, three, or four different offices — of offices, too, which require essentially different qualifications, and even if the incumbent has time and talent enough, would require him to be in three or four different places at the same moment. There are some men who, putting the deficiency of ubiquity out of the question, are able to shine in both the camp and council. Julius CÆsar, Napoleon Bonaparte, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, were statesmen as well as soldiers; but we may be pardoned for doubting whether they have their counterpart in modern times. Instead of enacting the part in history of either of those great personages, or, indeed, suggesting to the liveliest imagination the faintest resemblance to them, the only image that our pluralists bring before the mind is one which presents the Commonwealth in a more ludicrous condition than that of a nursing mother of swine, for we have never heard of a sow w
ne patriots, whose master passion is country, not self; worthy sons, brothers, and husbands of the truest and bravest women in the world, worthy to lay the foundations of the best and grandest Government in all the earth. We do not wish to be misunderstood. We detest and abhor the radicalism and red republicanism that has just shown us in the old United States how close akin they are to the most detestable Despotism. We trust that this new Government of ours will be a genuine representative Republic, not a Democracy; and no better model for each State in it could be found than the old Constitution of Virginia. This thing of letting everybody vote for everything is the source of all our present woes. Especially in the army must the gradations of rank be distinct and well defined, and the power of authority be supreme. We do not even advocate a very material increase of the pay of the private soldiers, for that would involve an expense which the country could not sustain, and,
plicity and justice, and injurious to the public service, because the same man cannot discharge with efficiency the duties of two, three, or four different offices — of offices, too, which require essentially different qualifications, and even if the incumbent has time and talent enough, would require him to be in three or four different places at the same moment. There are some men who, putting the deficiency of ubiquity out of the question, are able to shine in both the camp and council. Julius CÆsar, Napoleon Bonaparte, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, were statesmen as well as soldiers; but we may be pardoned for doubting whether they have their counterpart in modern times. Instead of enacting the part in history of either of those great personages, or, indeed, suggesting to the liveliest imagination the faintest resemblance to them, the only image that our pluralists bring before the mind is one which presents the Commonwealth in a more ludicrous condition than that of a
Abe Lincoln (search for this): article 1
he shameless display of selfishness and greed at a time like this, when the great mass of the people are making the grandest sacrifices ever recorded in history. Worst of all, most brazen and infamous of all, is the ravenous pertina city of old Lincoln office-holders, office seekers, and office-expectants, of men who stood by the flag of Lincoln till he himself booted them into resistance, now endeavoring to assuage their disappointed appetites by jumping and snapping at everything in the shapime like this, when the great mass of the people are making the grandest sacrifices ever recorded in history. Worst of all, most brazen and infamous of all, is the ravenous pertina city of old Lincoln office-holders, office seekers, and office-expectants, of men who stood by the flag of Lincoln till he himself booted them into resistance, now endeavoring to assuage their disappointed appetites by jumping and snapping at everything in the shape of an office which the new Republic has to give.
George Washington (search for this): article 1
e public service, because the same man cannot discharge with efficiency the duties of two, three, or four different offices — of offices, too, which require essentially different qualifications, and even if the incumbent has time and talent enough, would require him to be in three or four different places at the same moment. There are some men who, putting the deficiency of ubiquity out of the question, are able to shine in both the camp and council. Julius CÆsar, Napoleon Bonaparte, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, were statesmen as well as soldiers; but we may be pardoned for doubting whether they have their counterpart in modern times. Instead of enacting the part in history of either of those great personages, or, indeed, suggesting to the liveliest imagination the faintest resemblance to them, the only image that our pluralists bring before the mind is one which presents the Commonwealth in a more ludicrous condition than that of a nursing mother of swine, for we have ne
Napoleon Bonaparte (search for this): article 1
and injurious to the public service, because the same man cannot discharge with efficiency the duties of two, three, or four different offices — of offices, too, which require essentially different qualifications, and even if the incumbent has time and talent enough, would require him to be in three or four different places at the same moment. There are some men who, putting the deficiency of ubiquity out of the question, are able to shine in both the camp and council. Julius CÆsar, Napoleon Bonaparte, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, were statesmen as well as soldiers; but we may be pardoned for doubting whether they have their counterpart in modern times. Instead of enacting the part in history of either of those great personages, or, indeed, suggesting to the liveliest imagination the faintest resemblance to them, the only image that our pluralists bring before the mind is one which presents the Commonwealth in a more ludicrous condition than that of a nursing mother of sw
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
We learn from the Knoxville (Tenn.) Register that Dr. John W. Lewis, late Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic Railroad, has been elected Superintendent of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Mr. J. B. Ross, of Macon, Ga., the other day presented the Ross Volunteers, of that city, with $600 in cash, and the young men in his employ presented the company with a beautiful Confederate States flag.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
We learn from the Knoxville (Tenn.) Register that Dr. John W. Lewis, late Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic Railroad, has been elected Superintendent of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Mr. J. B. Ross, of Macon, Ga., the other day presented the Ross Volunteers, of that city, with $600 in cash, and the young men in his employ presented the company with a beautiful Confederate States flag.
J. B. Ross (search for this): article 2
We learn from the Knoxville (Tenn.) Register that Dr. John W. Lewis, late Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic Railroad, has been elected Superintendent of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. Mr. J. B. Ross, of Macon, Ga., the other day presented the Ross Volunteers, of that city, with $600 in cash, and the young men in his employ presented the company with a beautiful Confederate States flag.
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