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Freestone Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
pleted without molestation. Although the enemy are well aware of all the main facts connected with the batteries, there may be some points upon which they are not informed, and hence I shall not publish the details for their benefit. Suffice it to say, that those already unmasked are three in number, and are situated upon Ship Point, North Point, and upon the headland where Dumfre's bay enters the Potomac. I may say, however, that there is a chain of batteries from Aquia Creek to Freestone Point.--They are very strongly constructed, with good protection to the men, and mount guns enough to stop entirely the passage of vessels on the river, should Gen. Trimble see fit.--They have had frequent trials during the past few days, and the fact has been clearly demonstrated, that no vessel can pass up or down the river uninjured, unless allowed to do so. The distance, in a direct line to the Maryland shore, is a mile and seven-tenths, if I remember rightly, and, with a proper elevation
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 25
ned by high life in camp, a trip to Manassas was decided upon. Saturday morning found us in a quiet country farm house, not far from the village. Standing beneath a trellis, over which sweet honeysuckles grow and shaded the porch, we waited patiently for "something to turn up" to give employment to two roving pens. Suddenly a dull, booming sound came to our ears from the direction of our batteries on the Potomac. "There's a gun," said my friend "Personne," who was quietly smoking his Havana; "and another, and another," as the reports reverberated through the air in quick succession. Every moment the firing increased, until the sounds run into each other, producing a continuous roar. "They are rolling ten-pins down on the river," said I. "And there's a ten-stroke!" was the reply, as a Columbiad belched forth its contents, and shook the hills with its tremendous report. "Shall we go down?" "Agreed!" Ten minutes later saw us in the saddle galloping over th
North Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 25
re concealed, and steamed on, satisfied that all was right in its direction.--Batteries in other places drew attention from this, and the works were completed without molestation. Although the enemy are well aware of all the main facts connected with the batteries, there may be some points upon which they are not informed, and hence I shall not publish the details for their benefit. Suffice it to say, that those already unmasked are three in number, and are situated upon Ship Point, North Point, and upon the headland where Dumfre's bay enters the Potomac. I may say, however, that there is a chain of batteries from Aquia Creek to Freestone Point.--They are very strongly constructed, with good protection to the men, and mount guns enough to stop entirely the passage of vessels on the river, should Gen. Trimble see fit.--They have had frequent trials during the past few days, and the fact has been clearly demonstrated, that no vessel can pass up or down the river uninjured, unless
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 25
s in advance. "Personne" took the hint. "My friend, what was the firing about this morning?" "Wall, I dun'no, reckon they're firing at the Yanks. I hearn they landed down by Occoquon." "But do you know anything about it?"--with a peculiar emphasis on the know. "Nary time," was the facetious reply. It was past growing dark as we rode into Dumfries; but, judging from a casual glance, I should say it is not as large nor as thriving as its namesake on the coast of Scotland. The hotel was full. Even a soft plank was denied us, and we pushed through the village towards Evansport, and took refuge in a farm-house. That night we slumbered sweetly on a white oak floor. The Evansport batteries. Hitherto nothing has been known of the important batteries that have been constructed at Evansport, and the operations were carried on in the most secret manner.--It was known that we had in process of construction some kind of works, with the view of blockading th
Occoquan River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
, and another," as the reports reverberated through the air in quick succession. Every moment the firing increased, until the sounds run into each other, producing a continuous roar. "They are rolling ten-pins down on the river," said I. "And there's a ten-stroke!" was the reply, as a Columbiad belched forth its contents, and shook the hills with its tremendous report. "Shall we go down?" "Agreed!" Ten minutes later saw us in the saddle galloping over the highway to Occoquan. The morning was very wet and disagreeable. The rain of the night previous had put the roads in a navigable condition, and although the mud was deep enough to float a Mississippi flat-boat we concluded it fordable, and pushed on. Dark masses of clouds hung in the sky and at times turned up their watering-pots and sprinkled us, as gardeners do their growing vegetables, until chased away by the sunshine. Between sunshine and shower, beneath giant elms, through oak forests, by dark pere
Ship Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
heavy guns were concealed, and steamed on, satisfied that all was right in its direction.--Batteries in other places drew attention from this, and the works were completed without molestation. Although the enemy are well aware of all the main facts connected with the batteries, there may be some points upon which they are not informed, and hence I shall not publish the details for their benefit. Suffice it to say, that those already unmasked are three in number, and are situated upon Ship Point, North Point, and upon the headland where Dumfre's bay enters the Potomac. I may say, however, that there is a chain of batteries from Aquia Creek to Freestone Point.--They are very strongly constructed, with good protection to the men, and mount guns enough to stop entirely the passage of vessels on the river, should Gen. Trimble see fit.--They have had frequent trials during the past few days, and the fact has been clearly demonstrated, that no vessel can pass up or down the river uninj
Quantico Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
schooner, doing good execution. The tugs were covered by the schooners, and were not subject to the fire directly, but it soon became so severe that they cut loose from the vessels and succeeded in making their escape up the river. Both were very badly injured, one of them so badly that it sunk a few miles above the batteries. The schooners were completely riddled, and were deserted by their crews. As soon as the firing ceased, long boats were sent out, and the two vessels towed into Quantico creek, where they now lie discharging cargo. One was laden with wood; the other with 433 bales of flue hay, 500 barrels cement, and a quantity of elegant furniture, including one piano. The firing from the batteries was very good, and the practicability of preventing vessels passing without serious injury fully demonstrated. Capt. Chatard, of the Navy, has been put in charge of these batteries by order of Gen. Trimble. He has the force well systematized, and by carefully selecting the
Dumfries, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
g the prominent cloud and changing the background into the "pink and rosy" hues of an ocean shell. Before night came we galloped into the ruined port of entry — Dumfries. So much for the poetical part of the ride; but imagine two woe be-gone horsemen, with clothing covered with the dirtiest kind of mud; faces like that of a s guileless of food since early morning; two ragged and runaway chimney sweeps, and you have the other side of the picture. In times of peace the good people of Dumfries would have arrested us as fugitive lunatics; but, fortunately, an hundred thousand soldiers, more or less, have upset all the old rules of propriety. As our objt do you know anything about it?"--with a peculiar emphasis on the know. "Nary time," was the facetious reply. It was past growing dark as we rode into Dumfries; but, judging from a casual glance, I should say it is not as large nor as thriving as its namesake on the coast of Scotland. The hotel was full. Even a soft p
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
he works were completed without molestation. Although the enemy are well aware of all the main facts connected with the batteries, there may be some points upon which they are not informed, and hence I shall not publish the details for their benefit. Suffice it to say, that those already unmasked are three in number, and are situated upon Ship Point, North Point, and upon the headland where Dumfre's bay enters the Potomac. I may say, however, that there is a chain of batteries from Aquia Creek to Freestone Point.--They are very strongly constructed, with good protection to the men, and mount guns enough to stop entirely the passage of vessels on the river, should Gen. Trimble see fit.--They have had frequent trials during the past few days, and the fact has been clearly demonstrated, that no vessel can pass up or down the river uninjured, unless allowed to do so. The distance, in a direct line to the Maryland shore, is a mile and seven-tenths, if I remember rightly, and, with a
Mathias Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 25
eries that have been constructed at Evansport, and the operations were carried on in the most secret manner.--It was known that we had in process of construction some kind of works, with the view of blockading the Potomac; but the location of them was a secret. The enemy got wind of the intention, and sent steam-tugs cruising up and down the shore, to examine carefully every point and headland. Whenever anything suspicious was seen, a few shots were fired as "feelers." Every spot from Mathias's Point to the Occoquon, was subjected to this test except the right one, and it singularly enough was passed by with a glance.--But few days since a steam-tug came up and burned a boat close under the guns, and within rifle distance of them. Every day the Federal men-of-war passed close by the insignificant cluster of pines behind which our heavy guns were concealed, and steamed on, satisfied that all was right in its direction.--Batteries in other places drew attention from this, and the wor
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