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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Ossining (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
ho have acquired their fortunes by swindling and dishonesty are as detestable thieves as any pickpockets whose faces figure in the Rogues' Gallery, and some of them inferior to pick pockets in intelligence and good manners. Many of the rich men of New York have cheated and robbed their way from the sewers to the Fifth Avenue as undeniably as others have cheated and robbed their way to the Penitentiary. By what base arts has Bennett himself crept into fortune! There is not a rogue in Sing Sing with a heart more corrupt, and a face that better fits the inside of prison bars, than the proprietor of the New York Herald Nor, among the crimes of which the law takes no cognizance, and which, in that region, go unwhipped of justice, who shall calculate the number of seductions, the murder of female innocence, and the vice and misery that follow in its train? And yet, it is this kind of life which a certain class of philosophers has always held up to the South as the acme of human happ
tion of the actual criminals of that city. The millionaires who have acquired their fortunes by swindling and dishonesty are as detestable thieves as any pickpockets whose faces figure in the Rogues' Gallery, and some of them inferior to pick pockets in intelligence and good manners. Many of the rich men of New York have cheated and robbed their way from the sewers to the Fifth Avenue as undeniably as others have cheated and robbed their way to the Penitentiary. By what base arts has Bennett himself crept into fortune! There is not a rogue in Sing Sing with a heart more corrupt, and a face that better fits the inside of prison bars, than the proprietor of the New York Herald Nor, among the crimes of which the law takes no cognizance, and which, in that region, go unwhipped of justice, who shall calculate the number of seductions, the murder of female innocence, and the vice and misery that follow in its train? And yet, it is this kind of life which a certain class of philosop
abor of the North should boast of its advantages over the slave labor of the South, on principles of humanity and philanthropy, it should carefully consider the pauperism and crime existing among us. There are about two millions of people inhabiting an area extending fifty miles from New York. The Metropolitan district contains about 1,300,000 people, who possess an aggregate wealth in real and personal estate of about one thousand millions of dollars. The assessors valued this property for 1859 at little over 750,000,000 and the census marshals added to this about 25 per cent. as the true or cash value, thus making about $1,000,000,000. This amount divided among 1,200,000 people, gives to each man, woman, and child about $833, or to each person twenty-one years of age about $1,600, or to each head of a family about $5,000. Here we find an aggregate and an individual wealth now here else to be found on the continent of America in a territory embracing the same area. But a glanc
April 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
Wealth, pauperism, and crime in the North --Facts Reached by the Census.--We commend the following to attention; [from the New York Herald, April 3, 1861.] A view extending some fifty miles, having New York city as a focus of observation, presents much that is gratifying and much that is to be regretted. Before the free labor of the North should boast of its advantages over the slave labor of the South, on principles of humanity and philanthropy, it should carefully consider the pauperism and crime existing among us. There are about two millions of people inhabiting an area extending fifty miles from New York. The Metropolitan district contains about 1,300,000 people, who possess an aggregate wealth in real and personal estate of about one thousand millions of dollars. The assessors valued this property for 1859 at little over 750,000,000 and the census marshals added to this about 25 per cent. as the true or cash value, thus making about $1,000,000,000. This amount di