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Greensburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
nd Gap, but his main force of eight thousand is at Youngsville, a distance of twenty miles from the railroad, ready for transportation to Nashville for service on the Nashville road. My informant says it is not the policy of the rebels to oppose Gen. Rousseau's progress down the Nashville road until his forces shall have crossed Green river. For obvious reasons the rebel pickets and scouts have all been withdrawn from the region of country between Bowling Green, Ghagow, and Greensburg, and my informant is clearly of opinion that it would be fatal to Gen. Rousseau's command to cross the Green river with anything like the present force under his command. There are at present many military gentlemen in Lebanon from your city. From Eastern Kentucky--Fright of the Lincolnites. The Cincinnati Commercial publishes the following letters from citizens of Portsmouth, Ohio. It is certainly refreshing to see with what cool impudence these Ohio nigger stealers talk of
Youngsville (New York, United States) (search for this): article 27
Col. Willich's Rhenish wine. I have just had an interview with a member of an extensive mercantile firm in New York, who has interests South and who has traveled extensively in the South, having left Buckner's headquarters at Bowling Green on Monday. He says that Buckner has 10,000 men at Bowling Green, and Gen. Hardee is in command at Cave City. On Friday last Zollicoffer was in Richmond. He has a force of two thousand at Cumberland Gap, but his main force of eight thousand is at Youngsville, a distance of twenty miles from the railroad, ready for transportation to Nashville for service on the Nashville road. My informant says it is not the policy of the rebels to oppose Gen. Rousseau's progress down the Nashville road until his forces shall have crossed Green river. For obvious reasons the rebel pickets and scouts have all been withdrawn from the region of country between Bowling Green, Ghagow, and Greensburg, and my informant is clearly of opinion that it wo
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
ember of an extensive mercantile firm in New York, who has interests South and who has traveled extensively in the South, having left Buckner's headquarters at Bowling Green on Monday. He says that Buckner has 10,000 men at Bowling Green, and Gen. Hardee is in command at Cave City. On Friday last Zollicoffer was in Richmond. He Bowling Green, and Gen. Hardee is in command at Cave City. On Friday last Zollicoffer was in Richmond. He has a force of two thousand at Cumberland Gap, but his main force of eight thousand is at Youngsville, a distance of twenty miles from the railroad, ready for transportation to Nashville for service on the Nashville road. My informant says it is not the policy of the rebels to oppose Gen. Rousseau's progress down the Nastil his forces shall have crossed Green river. For obvious reasons the rebel pickets and scouts have all been withdrawn from the region of country between Bowling Green, Ghagow, and Greensburg, and my informant is clearly of opinion that it would be fatal to Gen. Rousseau's command to cross the Green river with anything like t
Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
he Big Sandy to allow Col. Zeigler's regiment from Ceredo, Va., to cross. Horrible Atrocity of the Lincolnites--two Southern-rights men brutally murdered at Paducah. The Louisville (Rowling Green) Courier, of the 22d inst., contains the following: We are informed, upon what we regard as reliable authority, that last week two prominent Southern-Rights men, of Paducah, were brutally murdered by the commander of the Lincoln troops at that point, for no crime of their own, but simply in retaliation for the hooting of some rascal pickets near Paducah. The victims of the Lincoln Government were Mr. Thomas Bell and Capt. J. Davis. They were both sPaducah. The victims of the Lincoln Government were Mr. Thomas Bell and Capt. J. Davis. They were both shot, and our informant states, as a positive fact, that the brutal wretches who perpetrated the deed first nailed Bell to the wall, with large spikes, through the palms of his hands and his flesh. Men of Kentucky ! the blood of these martyrs cries aloud to you for vengeance ! Let it be swift and terrible !
Louisa, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
swim. The men belonging to Hon. Laban T. Moore's regiment, forming here, are all under arms, expecting an attack every hour. The town is full of reports from the country — depredations being committed in different parts of Laurance county. In Louisa, the county seat, it is said that several houses were burned last night. And now the report comes in, that six or seven thousand were marching on Louisa yesterday afternoon, and were expected there last night. The men have nearly all left that Louisa yesterday afternoon, and were expected there last night. The men have nearly all left that part of the country and are coming down here for assistance. If the rebels attack this place, I think they will get a warm reception. But I will not brag before the light comes off. You may wish to know where these six or seven thousand men came from. I will tell you what is said here. Some gentlemen who came here a few days since from Pike county say that the advance guard of an army came to the house of a farmer who lives in that county, took 20 or 30 head of cattle, killed them, and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
progress down the Nashville road until his forces shall have crossed Green river. For obvious reasons the rebel pickets and scouts have all been withdrawn from the region of country between Bowling Green, Ghagow, and Greensburg, and my informant is clearly of opinion that it would be fatal to Gen. Rousseau's command to cross the Green river with anything like the present force under his command. There are at present many military gentlemen in Lebanon from your city. From Eastern Kentucky--Fright of the Lincolnites. The Cincinnati Commercial publishes the following letters from citizens of Portsmouth, Ohio. It is certainly refreshing to see with what cool impudence these Ohio nigger stealers talk of coming over to Kentucky and "cleaning out" her brave people. They will, we apprehend, get heartily sick of the job before they get through with it: Bgonn Furnace, Oct. 5, 1861. There is a terrible excitement up here.--Every person is up in arms. We have be
Floyd (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
t received a letter from Major Thomas D. Green, of Portsmouth. He says the Government will do all that can be done. The Union men are pouring in large numbers, but we have neither supplies nor arms. Mr. Gallop, who has been to Louisville for Col. Moore's regiment, reports seventeen regiments ahead of him for supplies, and that they cannot be furnished. Prestonsburg is sixty five miles up the Big Sandy, and Piketon is one hundred and five miles up the same. Prestonsburg is in Floyd county, and is connected with Abingdon, Va., which is situated on the Great Southern Railroad, by a good road, along which vast quantities of Kentucky stock have been driven for the Southern army. The Mt. Sterling (Ky.) Whig, of the 11th, has the following particulars in reference to the "rebel" encampment near Prestonsburg, Floyd county, which has been christened "Camp Dixie." There are between 3,000 and 4,000 men in it, and more coming in every day. Not half of these have arms. Bre
Bacon Creek, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
From Kentucky. Combination of Generals Buckner's, Polk's, and Zollicoffer's forces — the recent skirmish at Bacon Creek — Admirable condition of the Confederate troops, etc. The following letter from Lebanon, Ky., to the Louisville Journal, will be interesting as giving our readers an insight into matters and things in that portion of the State: Leeanon, Ky., Oct. 16, 1861. As I informed you by telegraph last evening, three men passed through Lebanon yesterday beyond Woodsonville. He says that on Sunday he saw twelve heavy pieces of artillery there, which were being placed in position. He was fully posted in reference to the skirmish between Col. Crittenden's pickets and those of the rebels at Bacon Creek, on Saturday last, mention of which has already been made in the Journal. John Morgan, of Lexington, headed the rebel forces, and it was he who dismounted from his horse and shot the Indiana captain. Morgan passed through Lebanon about six we
Abingdon, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 27
D. Green, of Portsmouth. He says the Government will do all that can be done. The Union men are pouring in large numbers, but we have neither supplies nor arms. Mr. Gallop, who has been to Louisville for Col. Moore's regiment, reports seventeen regiments ahead of him for supplies, and that they cannot be furnished. Prestonsburg is sixty five miles up the Big Sandy, and Piketon is one hundred and five miles up the same. Prestonsburg is in Floyd county, and is connected with Abingdon, Va., which is situated on the Great Southern Railroad, by a good road, along which vast quantities of Kentucky stock have been driven for the Southern army. The Mt. Sterling (Ky.) Whig, of the 11th, has the following particulars in reference to the "rebel" encampment near Prestonsburg, Floyd county, which has been christened "Camp Dixie." There are between 3,000 and 4,000 men in it, and more coming in every day. Not half of these have arms. Breckinridge left some ten or fourteen
Grayson, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 27
etting a very heavy force, and intend to clean out Grayson and this place, as they are determined to have revenge for taking them prisoners and killing the two at Grayson. I think the best thing that could be done would be to form a camp at Grayson, as the whole upper end of this State is pretty well thinned out of men, and the seGrayson, as the whole upper end of this State is pretty well thinned out of men, and the secesh are recruiting from Tennessee and also from the lower end of Virginia and Kentucky; so, they are collecting a very heavy force, and there is something that will be done soon — where, we do not know. We have the Jefferson Home Guard here from Kinney brock on guard to-night, as our guards are all tired out. They have had a pretty hard tramp of it marching from Grayson, and then standing on guard for two nights. And the best thing that Portsmouth could do would be to help get up a camp somewhere in the upper end of this State, as it would be a great protection for her, for, if they should clean out this place and Grayson, they would have a clean swee
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