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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 4
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear,St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.
Henry Wilson (search for this): article 4
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.
Lewis Wilson (search for this): article 4
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.
Charles Hunt (search for this): article 4
A frightful stampede of cavalry horses. --A frightful stampede of cavalry horses took place recently at St. Charles, Mo. A St. Louis paper thus describes it: Colonel Merrill's First Missouri Regiment of horse was on its way to reinforce General Fremont, and quartered for the night at St. Charles. About ten o'clock the horses of Captain Charles Hunt's company became frightened and broke loose. The panic was shared by the others, and soon fourteen hundred horses, maddened with fear, went rushing over the encampment, treading tents and men into the earth, and creating a scene of unparalleled excitement. Twelve men are known to have been frightfully mangled, and probably fatally; but the only member of the companies composing the regiment, which was organized in Ohio, at all injured, was Captain Henry Wilson, brother of Capt. Lewis Wilson, United States Army. His skull was fractured and an arm and leg broken. Little hope of his recovery is entertained.