hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Baker 20 18 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 19 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Fremont 17 3 Browse Search
Devens 15 15 Browse Search
Jeremiah M. Smith 14 0 Browse Search
John Miller 12 0 Browse Search
Gorman 12 10 Browse Search
Scott 12 4 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 106 total hits in 37 results.

1 2 3 4
Goose Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
. Murphy, and Lieuts. Pierce and Gouraud, with orders to advance along the Leesburg road until they should come to the vicinity of a battery which was known to be on that road, and then turn to the left and examine the heights between that and Goose Creek, and see if any of the enemy were posted in the vicinity, find out their numbers as nearly as possible, their disposition, examine the country with reference to the passage of troops to the Leesburg and Georgetown turnpike, and return rapidly ase he found it practicable, and the position on the other side favorable. I stated that I wished no advance made unless the enemy were of inferior force, and under no circumstances to pass beyond Leesburg, or a strong position between it and Goose Creek, on the Gum Spring. i. e., the Manassas road. Col. Baker was cautioned in reference to passing artillery across the river; and I begged if he did do so to see it well supported by good infantry. The General pointed out to him the position
Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 12
e from disaster and make preparations for moving them as rapidly as possible. Orders arrived from General McClellan to hold the island and Virginia shore at Edwards's Ferry at all risks, indicating at the same time that reinforcements would be sent, and additional means of entrenching were forwarded, and Gen. Gorman was furnished with particular directions to hold out against any and every force of the enemy. During that time Gen. Hamilton, with his brigade, was on the march from Darnestown. Before I left to go to the right, I issued orders to intercept him, and instructed him to repair to Conrad's Ferry, where orders awaited him to so dispose of his force as to give protection to Harrison's Island, and protect the line of the river. At 3 A. M. Major General Banks arrived and took command. A report of division for the following days will be made out speedily. I cannot conclude without hearing testimony to the courage, good discipline, and conduct of all the troops of
o the point indicated, Col. Lee remaining on the bluff with 100 men to cover his return. To distract attention from Col. Devens's movements, and to make a reconnaissance in the direction of Leesburg from Edwards's Ferry, I directed Gen. Gorman to throw across the river, at that point, two companies of the 1st Minnesota under cover of a fire from Rickett's battery, and sent out a party of 31 Van Allen cavalry, under Maj. Mix, accompanied by Capt. Chas. Stewart, Assistant Adjutant General, Capt. Murphy, and Lieuts. Pierce and Gouraud, with orders to advance along the Leesburg road until they should come to the vicinity of a battery which was known to be on that road, and then turn to the left and examine the heights between that and Goose Creek, and see if any of the enemy were posted in the vicinity, find out their numbers as nearly as possible, their disposition, examine the country with reference to the passage of troops to the Leesburg and Georgetown turnpike, and return rapidly to
he landing place. Col. Devens was ordered to make close observation of the position, strength and movements of the enemy, and, in the event of there being no enemy there visible, to hold on in a secure position until he could be strengthened sufficiently to make a valuable reconnaissance. At this time orders were sent to Col. Baker to send the First California regiment to Conrad's Ferry, to arrive there at sunrise, and to have the remainder of his brigade ready to move early. Lieut. Col. Wood, of the 25th Massachusetts, was also ordered to move with a battalion to the river bank opposite Harrison's island by daybreak. Two mounted howitzers in charge of Lieut. French, of Rickett's battery, were ordered to the tow-path opposite Harrison's island. Col. Devens, in pursuance of his orders, crossed and proceeded to the point indicated, Col. Lee remaining on the bluff with 100 men to cover his return. To distract attention from Col. Devens's movements, and to make a reconnai
his reconnaissance, and giving due notice of the appoach of any force, and that Lieut. Col. Ward, with his battalion of the 15th Massachusetts, should move on to Smoot's Mills, half a mile to the right of the crossing place of Col. Devens, and see where, in a strong position, he could watch and protect the flank of Col. Devens in his return, and secure a second crossing more favorable than the first, and connected by a good road with Leesburg.--Capt. Candy, Assistant Adjutant General, and Gen. Lander accompanied the cavally to serve with it. For some reason never explained to me, neither of these orders were carried out. The cavalry were transferred to the Virginia shore, but were sent back without having left the shore to go inland, and thus Col. Devens was deprived of the means of obtaining warning of any approach of the enemy. The battalion under Col. Ward was detained on the Bluff in the rear of Colonel Devens, instead of being directed to the right. Col. Baker having arrive
d for their men, and men for their officers, that beautiful devotion which is only to be found among true soldiers. While these scenes were being enacted on the right, I was preparing on the left for a rapid push forward to the road by which the enemy would retreat if driven, and entirely unsuspicious of the perilous condition of our troops. The additional artillery had already been sent, and when the messenger, who did not leave the field until after 3 o'clock, was questioned as to Col. Bakers position, he informed me that the Colonel, when he left seemed to feel perfectly secure, and could doubtless hold his position in case he should not advance. The same statement was made by another messenger half an hour later, and I watched anxiously for a sign of advance on the right, in order to push forward General Gorman. It was, as had been explained to Col. Baker, impracticable to throw General Gorman's brigade directly to the right by reason of the battery in the woods, between w
o have the remainder of his brigade ready to move early. Lieut. Col. Wood, of the 25th Massachusetts, was also ordered to move with a battalion to the river bank opposite Harrison's island by daybreak. Two mounted howitzers in charge of Lieut. French, of Rickett's battery, were ordered to the tow-path opposite Harrison's island. Col. Devens, in pursuance of his orders, crossed and proceeded to the point indicated, Col. Lee remaining on the bluff with 100 men to cover his return. To iest fire, and came gallantly into action, with a yell which wavered the enemy's line. Lieut. Bramhall, of Bunting's Battery, had succeeded, after extraordinary exertions and labor, in bringing up a piece of the Rhode Island Battery, and Lieut. French his two howitzers, but both officers, after well-directed firing, were soon borne away wounded, and their pieces were hauled to the rear, so that they might not fall into the enemy's hands. At 4 P. M. Colonel Baker fell at the head of hi
nced by their cheering that they were all ready and determined to fight gallantly when the opportunity was presented. At dusk, Gen. Gorman's brigade and the 7th Michigan returned to camp, leaving the Tammany regiment and the companies of the 15th Massachusetts and artillery at Conrad's Ferry in position, awaiting the return of scouts.--Meanwhile Gen. Stone remained at Edwards's Ferry. At 10 o'clock P. M., Lieut. Howe, Quartermaster of the 15th Massachusetts, reported that scouts under Capt. Philbrick had returned to the island, having been within one mile of Leesburg, and there discovering in the edge of a wood an encampment of 30 tents. No pickets were out any distance, and he approached to within 25 rods without being even challenged. Orders were then instantly sent to Colonel Devens to cross four companies to the Virginia shore, and march silently under cover of night to the position of the camp referred to, to attack and destroy it at day break, pursue the enemy lodged the
of the whole enterprise and its results upon Col. Baker, is a miserable failure, and the whole resposance. At this time orders were sent to Col. Baker to send the First California regiment to Conns, instead of being directed to the right. Col. Baker having arrived at Conrad's Ferry with the 1s the Gum Spring. i. e., the Manassas road. Col. Baker was cautioned in reference to passing artills overwhelmed his regiment. Thinking that Colonel Baker might be able to use more artillery, I disn below the place of crossing, and report to Col. Baker. Col. Baker suggested this himself later in Col. Baker suggested this himself later in the day, just before the guns on their way arrived. After Col. Devens's second advance, Col. Ba and 1st California, which had arrived. Col. Baker now formed his line and waited the attack ofll into the enemy's hands. At 4 P. M. Colonel Baker fell at the head of his column, pierced byaster. I immediately apprised Gen. Banks of Col. Baker's death, and I rode quickly to the right to [7 more...]
Gorman's brigade, 7th Michigan, two troops of the Van Allen cavalry, and the Putnam Rangers, while four companies of the 16th Massachusetts volunteers were sent to Harrison's island, under Col. Devens, who then had one company on the island, and Col. Lee, with a battalion of the Massachusetts 20th, a section of the Rhode Island battery, and Tammany regiment, was sent to Conrad's Ferry. A section of Bunting's New York battery and Rickett's battery were already on duty respectively at Edward's ann's island by daybreak. Two mounted howitzers in charge of Lieut. French, of Rickett's battery, were ordered to the tow-path opposite Harrison's island. Col. Devens, in pursuance of his orders, crossed and proceeded to the point indicated, Col. Lee remaining on the bluff with 100 men to cover his return. To distract attention from Col. Devens's movements, and to make a reconnaissance in the direction of Leesburg from Edwards's Ferry, I directed Gen. Gorman to throw across the river, at th
1 2 3 4