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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
s holding no previous commission. We believe the oldest commission of Major-General in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States is that of General Polk. We think we are not mistaken in saying that these commissions have, in every case, so farc intention on the part of the Executive. When mention is made of commissions in the "Provisional Army" of the Confederate States, the meaning is that the commissions are not permanent as if in the regular military service of the Confederacy, buxigency of the war, and is not a permanent establishment of the Government. Commissions in the Provisional Army of Confederate States are to be considered in contradistinction to commissions emanating from the States individually. For instance, we believe General Pillow holds a commission as Major-General from the State of Tennessee, while General Polk holds one of the same tenor from the Confederate States. We believe we have practically responded to the interrogatory of our correspondent.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
here, for criticism, and probably mistakes, which are unavoidable by all men, may have been committed; but we see nothing to impeach a sound, just, and patriotic intention on the part of the Executive. When mention is made of commissions in the "Provisional Army" of the Confederate States, the meaning is that the commissions are not permanent as if in the regular military service of the Confederacy, but are to cease at the termination of the war. The Provisional Army is raised to meet the exigency of the war, and is not a permanent establishment of the Government. Commissions in the Provisional Army of Confederate States are to be considered in contradistinction to commissions emanating from the States individually. For instance, we believe General Pillow holds a commission as Major-General from the State of Tennessee, while General Polk holds one of the same tenor from the Confederate States. We believe we have practically responded to the interrogatory of our correspondent.
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
eneral of the Provisional Army?" We might plead in reply, that we have never graduated at West Point, nor rubbed up against the walls of the institution; and therefore are to be presumed entirely military matters: or else, if ever so well informed through some miraculous agency unknown to West Point, are not authorized to speak, having no diploma from that crack institution of the North. As e gradation would have been very different. We believe all the full Generals are graduates of West Point. Within the last month or two quite a number of commissions have been issued for Major-Gen in saying that these commissions have, in every case, so far, been conferred on graduates of West Point. Whether it be the intention of the President to confine himself in the conferring of them to that class of persons, we cannot undertake to say; though we trust not; for West Point, however admirable an institution it may be for the formation of drill officers and engineers, and however valua
France (France) (search for this): article 1
or, Captain, &c. We believe in the army of the Confederacy there is no such rank as Lieutenant-General; and that next after full General comes Major-General. Whether the rank of Lieutenant-General is unknown to our law or not, it is certain that no officer in the Confederate army holds that commission. All the rest of the grades we have enumerated, however, are represented in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot underta
A. Sydney Johnston (search for this): article 1
est of the grades we have enumerated, however, are represented in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot undertake to explain. We believe that the Confederate Congress sanctioned the schedule, and what the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Congress, has done, let no man question. We will only say, that if we had had the arrangement of relative rank among these Generals, the gradation would have been ver
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): article 1
ever, are represented in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot undertake to explain. We believe that the Confederate Congress sanctioned the schedule, and what the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Congress, has done, let no man question. We will only say, that if we had had the arrangement of relative rank among these Generals, the gradation would have been very different. We believe all the full Gen
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): article 1
in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot undertake to explain. We believe that the Confederate Congress sanctioned the schedule, and what the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Congress, has done, let no man question. We will only say, that if we had had the arrangement of relative rank among these Generals, the gradation would have been very different. We believe all the full Generals are graduates of
Robert E. Lee (search for this): article 1
have enumerated, however, are represented in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot undertake to explain. We believe that the Confederate Congress sanctioned the schedule, and what the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Congress, has done, let no man question. We will only say, that if we had had the arrangement of relative rank among these Generals, the gradation would have been very different. We bel
S. Cooper (search for this): article 1
ission. All the rest of the grades we have enumerated, however, are represented in the Confederate army. We suppose the full General in the Confederate service corresponds with the Field-Marshal of France, the Lieutenant-General in the Federal service, and the rank usually held by commanders of divisions operating independently in the field, in all the European services. There are five full Generals in the Confederate army, whose relative rank, as among themselves, is as follows: 1. S. Cooper; 2. A. Sydney Johnston; 3. Robert E. Lee; 4. Joseph E. Johnston; 5. G. T. Beauregard.--What principles governed the President in thus arranging the relative rank of these officers, we cannot undertake to explain. We believe that the Confederate Congress sanctioned the schedule, and what the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Congress, has done, let no man question. We will only say, that if we had had the arrangement of relative rank among these Generals, the gradation
here, for criticism, and probably mistakes, which are unavoidable by all men, may have been committed; but we see nothing to impeach a sound, just, and patriotic intention on the part of the Executive. When mention is made of commissions in the "Provisional Army" of the Confederate States, the meaning is that the commissions are not permanent as if in the regular military service of the Confederacy, but are to cease at the termination of the war. The Provisional Army is raised to meet the exigency of the war, and is not a permanent establishment of the Government. Commissions in the Provisional Army of Confederate States are to be considered in contradistinction to commissions emanating from the States individually. For instance, we believe General Pillow holds a commission as Major-General from the State of Tennessee, while General Polk holds one of the same tenor from the Confederate States. We believe we have practically responded to the interrogatory of our correspondent.
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