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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 15 total hits in 7 results.

Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 4
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 4
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leavingw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
George M. Aird (search for this): article 4
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving aw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
Henry Cooper (search for this): article 4
agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes havllowers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.
Direct from the Indian country. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 6th instant, says: We learn from Mr. George M. Aird, direct from the Seminale agency, that Opothleyoholo had collected together about 4,000 or 5,000 Indians, and about 1,300 negroes, who had gone to him with the hope of being freed — When Gen. Cooper, at the head of the Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw regiments, with other Indians, amounting to near 5,000, advanced upon Opothleyoholo's camp, his followers fled, leaving all behind. Opothleyoholo left with a few followers, and has either gone to Salt Plains, or to Kansas Most of his followers are with Col. Cooper, and he has a very large Indian force now with him Col Cooper sent a man after Opothleyoholo, but he had not come in when Mr. Aird left.--All is quiet now. The Seminotes have all the time remained firm friends to the South.