hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 52 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 36 0 Browse Search
W. M. Gwin 25 1 Browse Search
Lincoln 17 1 Browse Search
Russia (Russia) 16 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 14 0 Browse Search
John Letcher 12 0 Browse Search
California (California, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 43 total hits in 18 results.

1 2
Wolverhampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 6
me. General trade. The trade of the country has undergone no very material change since our last report.--Dullness is still prevalent, and while it is evident that the trade generally is not worse, it is difficult to say that it has improved. At Bradford there has been a moderate demand for home requirements, but as regards the continental trade, the result of Leipsic Fair is writed for before it is considered prudent to enter upon large transactions. The iron trade of Wolverhampton is but partially supported, although the probability of an early demand from North America is generally indulged in. The Nottingham market for goods and yarns has advanced considerably, and the demand for hosiery has been very brisk. A very active demand in the Leeds woolen cloth market is noticeable. It is said that London houses received large orders from country tailors and drapers. The French treaty has had the effect of giving rise to considerable shipments of Manche
Galveston (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 6
tice for the purpose of negotiating a treaty of peace with the Confederate Generals. As to the capture of Fort Hatteras, that is an insignificant item against all the reverses of the North. The disgrace of the battle of Bull Run would not be expunged by the success of a score of naval expeditions undertaken against a power without any navy whatever. The success of every expedition of this kind may be predicated with certainty. But what of that? What if Mobile, and New Orleans, and Galveston were in possession of the North, how would such an occupation influence the fortunes of the war?--Every way, say some wiseacres; these ports would then be open to the commerce of the world, and the cotton crop would be shipped to Europe. Ay, indeed! We in our simplicity supposed that it was the North who had blockaded these ports, to prevent the shipment of the cotton, which would have supplied to the South the sinews of war. Oh but the object is to take the cotton by force, and apply th
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
hington; and, if it fight for nothing else, it must henceforth fight for its national existence — for were it to yield ingloriously now, and acknowledge the Confederate States without proving that Secession cannot be attempted with impunity, and that all its strength would be put forth to crush it there would be no end of Secession movements, until several independent nations, with interests hostile to each other, had grown out of the once great United States. Yes, the Union is worth fighting for, though we are thoroughly satisfied that it cannot be restored. The magnitude of the loss which the North will sustain by its dissolution surpasses that of t of us imagine. And if such expeditions should effect a landing and penetrates inland, the only allies they would meet would be the negro population of the Confederate States. Terrible allies those. Such expeditions, if successful, might result not merely in the destruction of the present crop, but might prevent the planting of
East India (search for this): article 6
brought down to 200,000 bales, as we fear it will be in less than six weeks, then prices of that description of cotton will be forced to a point which will compel spinners either to enormously curtail their consumption or to use East Indian cotton, against which they entertain so strong a prejudice. We are convinced that, even at this moment, few realize the extent of distress which a dearth of cotton must bring on this country especially. The substitution, without further delay, of East India for American cotton, and an immediate general resort to short time, can alone enable us to tide over the coming winter with comparative safety. Strange that those most deeply interested are so blind to their own interests as to persevere in using American cotton almost exclusively, and in working their mills full time, while it is impossible to forecast the duration of the cotton famine. The American crop is stowed away by the planters in the seed, to facilitate its destruction by fi
North America (search for this): article 6
trade of the country has undergone no very material change since our last report.--Dullness is still prevalent, and while it is evident that the trade generally is not worse, it is difficult to say that it has improved. At Bradford there has been a moderate demand for home requirements, but as regards the continental trade, the result of Leipsic Fair is writed for before it is considered prudent to enter upon large transactions. The iron trade of Wolverhampton is but partially supported, although the probability of an early demand from North America is generally indulged in. The Nottingham market for goods and yarns has advanced considerably, and the demand for hosiery has been very brisk. A very active demand in the Leeds woolen cloth market is noticeable. It is said that London houses received large orders from country tailors and drapers. The French treaty has had the effect of giving rise to considerable shipments of Manchester goods on French account.
Bradford, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 6
being used up by our manufacturers with a reckless prodigality. Even the advancing prices of goods and yarns in Manchester serves for the time to increase our danger, because it causes many of the mills to continue working full time. General trade. The trade of the country has undergone no very material change since our last report.--Dullness is still prevalent, and while it is evident that the trade generally is not worse, it is difficult to say that it has improved. At Bradford there has been a moderate demand for home requirements, but as regards the continental trade, the result of Leipsic Fair is writed for before it is considered prudent to enter upon large transactions. The iron trade of Wolverhampton is but partially supported, although the probability of an early demand from North America is generally indulged in. The Nottingham market for goods and yarns has advanced considerably, and the demand for hosiery has been very brisk. A very active
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 6
ng danger we care not to have recourse to the figures of the cotton tables to show how rapidly our stock of the raw material is being used up by our manufacturers with a reckless prodigality. Even the advancing prices of goods and yarns in Manchester serves for the time to increase our danger, because it causes many of the mills to continue working full time. General trade. The trade of the country has undergone no very material change since our last report.--Dullness is still preved, although the probability of an early demand from North America is generally indulged in. The Nottingham market for goods and yarns has advanced considerably, and the demand for hosiery has been very brisk. A very active demand in the Leeds woolen cloth market is noticeable. It is said that London houses received large orders from country tailors and drapers. The French treaty has had the effect of giving rise to considerable shipments of Manchester goods on French account.
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
Late and Direct from Europe.commercial views of the American war. We publish below a late and very interesting article from Gore's Liverpool Commercial Advertiser, dated October 10, on the state of trade in Liverpool, and more especially in reference to the American war. As indicative of the effect that the fall of Port Royal will be likely to have upon the public mind in England, the Charleston Mercury, (which first published the article in this country,) says it will be found especially important.--The Mercury obtains its advices direct from Europe, and not through the medium of Yankee ports: The most important item of American news which has been received since this day seen night is the capture by the Confederate troops, under Gen. Price, of the stronghold of Lexington. This is a valuable acquisition to the South, and its loss will be severely felt by the North. The commercial intelligence is of a gloomy cast, as the belief was very general that the Banks would, af
than the Southern States have to gain by the dissolution of the Union. The interests involved in its preservation are so vast that the Secretary of State of the Federal Government speaks of it, in an official document issued so recently as the 21st ult., from the Department of State at Washington, as "the chief hope of humanity in all countries and for all ages." Exaggerated as this sentiment is, the source from which it emanates gives it sigificance. It proves that the Government of President Lincoln feel and know that the preservation of the Union is a question of overwhelming importance to the Northern States--that it is worth fighting for — worth maintaining, or trying to maintain, at almost any sacrifice of blood and treasure, even with the knowledge that every sacrifice will be futile, and that the chasm which now separates the Northern from the Southern States has grown so deep and wide that it will never more be spanned by the magnificent bridge of the old Federal Union.
J. T. Moore (search for this): article 6
important item of American news which has been received since this day seen night is the capture by the Confederate troops, under Gen. Price, of the stronghold of Lexington. This is a valuable acquisition to the South, and its loss will be severely felt by the North. The commercial intelligence is of a gloomy cast, as the belief was very general that the Banks would, after awhile, be obliged to suspend specie payments. Amongst the failures of the week was that of Messrs. C. W. and J. T. Moore, of New York--one of the oldest and most respectable firms in the dry goods trade. The total subscriptions to the Federal loan of £10,000,000, amounted only to 3,600,000; but the New York journals confidently assert that the Banks would take the fresh $10,000,000 required by the Government.--Some of the mills in the East, which had been either stopped or running short time, were again fully, and it is said, profitably employed, goods having advanced considerably, and being much wanted.
1 2