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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 11
ot French.--The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole family, and the rest of them have never been heard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United States navy; to which fact has unjustly been attributed all the knavery of which he has since been guilty. He then spent a long time in surveying railroads in Georgia, North Carolina, and East Tennessee, most of which were never built, and are not likely to be during the present war. Subsequently he became, and still is, a great friend to underground railroads, and recently, projected a very extensive one in Missouri, but was denied a charter and the right of way by the Federal President on account of the heavy expense the Government would have to incur in feeding the passengers. John Charles next turns up as an explorer of new routes through the Ro
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 11
ut they disappear so rapidly that the thing is impossible, unless we double our corps of editors, which we can't afford to do. John C. Fremont, the C in whose name usually stands for Charles, was born, at a very early age, in the city of Savannah, Ga., a distinction of which the city of Savannah, Ga., is at present not particularly proud. If, in retiring to the shades of private life, he shall not seek them at the bottom of the nearest millpond, and should escape the chances of being hangSavannah, Ga., is at present not particularly proud. If, in retiring to the shades of private life, he shall not seek them at the bottom of the nearest millpond, and should escape the chances of being hanged until the 21st of January, 1862, he will on that day be forty-nine years old. Just twelve months afterward he will be fifty. His parents of whom he had two, all other statements to the contrary notwithstanding, were not both Frenchmen, as some suppose, but his father was very much so.--The maiden name of the latter has never been satisfactorily ascertained, though it is presumed to have been Fremont. That of his mother was Whiting. She was a very rich young lady, who, at the age of sevent
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 11
s. We could relate hundreds of others, but forbear, as they might seem incredible to some of our readers. John Charles was at one time elected Governor of California by the settlers out there, who were not very well acquainted with him. Some other stranger also appointed him lieutenant-colonel in the United States Army. Thi lower, and made a major of volunteers. The ending of the war has never been attributed to him. In 1847 Commodore Stockton and Gen. Kearny got to quarreling in California as to which of them should play the first fiddle in the government of the country. John haries took sides with the former, but the latter got the best of the rhe sentence — which was a pity. John Charles, however, resigned in disgust, and went in search of some more adventures among the mountains. Being a citizen of California, he was elected to represent that State in the United States Senate, when it was admitted into the Union in 1850; but he had the ill luck to draw the straw whic
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole family, and the rest of them have never been heard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United States navy; to which fact has unjustly been attributed all the knavery of which he has since been guilty. He then spent a long time in surveying railroads in Georgia, North Carolina, and East Tennessee, most of which were never built, and are not likely to be during the present war. Subsequently he became, and still is, a great friend to underground railroads, and recently, projected a very extensive one in Missouri, but was denied a charter and the right of way by the Federal President on account of the heavy expense the Government would have to incur in feeding the passengers. John Charles next turns up as an explorer of new routes through the Rocky Mountains
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 11
We may never get the money of which he plundered his Government; but we can safely believe that it will never be used against us. His connection with the army in Missouri, as commanding General, was a great element of weakness, and its discontinuance is to be regretted. His untimely removal was a heavy reinforcement of the Federakely to be during the present war. Subsequently he became, and still is, a great friend to underground railroads, and recently, projected a very extensive one in Missouri, but was denied a charter and the right of way by the Federal President on account of the heavy expense the Government would have to incur in feeding the passenges army, but is understood to have always been a non-commissioned officer in his own family, Jessie having ranked him from the start. His military career in Missouri is well known. It was brief, but not brilliant. His skill as a General was not formidable to our Government, but his want of skill was very much so to his own,
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole family, and the rest of them have never been heard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United States navy; to which fact has unjustly been attributed all the knavery of which he has since been guilty. He then spent a long time in surveying railroads in Georgia, North Carolina, and East Tennessee, most of which were never built, and are not likely to be during the present war. Subsequently he became, and still is, a great friend to underground railroads, and recently, projected a very extensive one in Missouri, but was denied a charter and the right of way by the Federal President on account of the heavy expense the Government would have to incur in feeding the passengers. John Charles next turns up as an explorer of new routes through the Rocky Mountains, to the shores of t
John C. Fremont (search for this): article 11
ad two, all other statements to the contrary notwithstanding, were not both Frenchmen, as some suppose, but his father was very much so.--The maiden name of the latter has never been satisfactorily ascertained, though it is presumed to have been Fremont. That of his mother was Whiting. She was a very rich young lady, who, at the age of seventeen, and some years previous to the first appearance of John Charles on any stage, married, under a sort of protest, a certain, or rather, we should say,quently the matrimonial firm of Mr. and Mrs. Pryor was dissolved by special act of the Georgia Legislature, when the former married his housekeeper, (the result no doubt of a Pryor engagement,) and the latter followed his example by marrying Monsieur Fremont, who had been engaged in teaching the young idea of Norfolk, Va., how to shoot French.--The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole
John Charles (search for this): article 11
een, and some years previous to the first appearance of John Charles on any stage, married, under a sort of protest, a certaThe consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbeard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United ent would have to incur in feeding the passengers. John Charles next turns up as an explorer of new routes through the they might seem incredible to some of our readers. John Charles was at one time elected Governor of California by the sgot the best of the row in the end, and at once ordered John Charles to Washington, to be tried for mutiny, disobedience of ny, and then remitted the sentence — which was a pity. John Charles, however, resigned in disgust, and went in search of sor of large volumes. O. B.'s daughter is the first thing John Charles is known to have stolen; it is believed the Federal Gov
me years previous to the first appearance of John Charles on any stage, married, under a sort of protest, a certain, or rather, we should say, a very uncertain, Major Pryor, an active and interesting youth of sixty- two. Twelve years subsequently the matrimonial firm of Mr. and Mrs. Pryor was dissolved by special act of the GeorgiaMr. and Mrs. Pryor was dissolved by special act of the Georgia Legislature, when the former married his housekeeper, (the result no doubt of a Pryor engagement,) and the latter followed his example by marrying Monsieur Fremont, who had been engaged in teaching the young idea of Norfolk, Va., how to shoot French.--The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortuMrs. Pryor was dissolved by special act of the Georgia Legislature, when the former married his housekeeper, (the result no doubt of a Pryor engagement,) and the latter followed his example by marrying Monsieur Fremont, who had been engaged in teaching the young idea of Norfolk, Va., how to shoot French.--The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole family, and the rest of them have never been heard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United States navy; to which fact has unjustly been attributed all the knavery of which he has
under a sort of protest, a certain, or rather, we should say, a very uncertain, Major Pryor, an active and interesting youth of sixty- two. Twelve years subsequently the matrimonial firm of Mr. and Mrs. Pryor was dissolved by special act of the Georgia Legislature, when the former married his housekeeper, (the result no doubt of a Pryor engagement,) and the latter followed his example by marrying Monsieur Fremont, who had been engaged in teaching the young idea of Norfolk, Va., how to shoot French.--The consequence was, three additional Fremonts, of whom John Charles was unfortunately one. Being a great sponge, he absorbed the notoriety of the whole family, and the rest of them have never been heard of since. Having in due time got to be a man, John Charles knocked about the world for some years with the United States navy; to which fact has unjustly been attributed all the knavery of which he has since been guilty. He then spent a long time in surveying railroads in Georgia, N
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