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France (France) (search for this): article 12
war debt, now about one hundred millions of dollars, thus removing every shackle on commerce and establishing a solute free trade. Commercial freedom would secure basting peace, and insure the highest state of civilization to as generous and chivalric a people as the world possesses. The nations having trade with us will be less taxed by assuming their proportion of our war indebtedness, than they would be by any tariff on imports that could be devised by us. For instance, Great Britain or France, by paying two, or at most three hundred thousand pounds per annum, would be entitled to unrestricted trade with the Confederate States, and their own tariff or revenue laws need not be in anywise deranged. To place the same amount of money in our treasury by any tariff on imports that we might impose would require a very large percentage to be added in consequence of our extensive frontier, inland and coastwise. Direct taxation can be relied on as all-sufficient for the ordinary civil exp
Brunswick, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 12
hat we might impose would require a very large percentage to be added in consequence of our extensive frontier, inland and coastwise. Direct taxation can be relied on as all-sufficient for the ordinary civil expenses of the Confederate Government. I have thrown out these ideas for your consideration in the hope that something better may be suggested if any peace propositions shall be made. The Lincoln Armada have taken possession of Port Royal, South Carolina, and may occupy Brunswick, Georgia. These were poorly defended points on our extensive Southern coast, but they were not of the slightest consequence commercially. The Yankee fleet may find tolerable anchorage, but not a bale of cotton or anything else material. The fact is there are but ten thousand bales of cotton in the city of New Orleans, which will be shipped up the river at any moment that city may be endangered. The Northern press asserts and would make us believe that Garibaldi contemplates coming to Am
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): article 12
ccupy Brunswick, Georgia. These were poorly defended points on our extensive Southern coast, but they were not of the slightest consequence commercially. The Yankee fleet may find tolerable anchorage, but not a bale of cotton or anything else material. The fact is there are but ten thousand bales of cotton in the city of New Orleans, which will be shipped up the river at any moment that city may be endangered. The Northern press asserts and would make us believe that Garibaldi contemplates coming to America. I cannot and will not believe it. Garibaldi, the Liberator of Italy, drawing his sword in behalf of the American Bombs, invading Virginia, the land of his great prototype, Washington, Pater PatriƦ! Much a course would be a burning and devouring lie to all of his eventful and hitherto glorious career. I write in great haste, omitting many things that I would like to speak of. Your friend, George N. Sanders To Louis Kossuth, Patriot Leader of Hungary, Turin, Italy.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
thern States and people. This threatened overthrow of the Constitution and assumption of extraordinary powers of the Federal Government by Lincoln and his party in Congress and in the Northern States Legislatures very naturally excited alarm South Carolina, more watchful and sagacious than the other States, declared her separation from a Union, the power of which was so soon to be used for her enslavement. It would have been imbecility and cowardice of the lowest character to have awaited the forging of the chains. But, even after South Carolina had so wisely taken the initiative President Davis, then Senator from Mississippi, Senator Hunter, of Virginia, Confederate States Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and Senator Toombs, of Georgia, now a General in the Confederate army, asked only for reasonable constitutional guarantees and pledges from the Lincoln administration, that the rights and interests of the Southern States and people should be held inviolable. Instead, however, of re
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
our treasury by any tariff on imports that we might impose would require a very large percentage to be added in consequence of our extensive frontier, inland and coastwise. Direct taxation can be relied on as all-sufficient for the ordinary civil expenses of the Confederate Government. I have thrown out these ideas for your consideration in the hope that something better may be suggested if any peace propositions shall be made. The Lincoln Armada have taken possession of Port Royal, South Carolina, and may occupy Brunswick, Georgia. These were poorly defended points on our extensive Southern coast, but they were not of the slightest consequence commercially. The Yankee fleet may find tolerable anchorage, but not a bale of cotton or anything else material. The fact is there are but ten thousand bales of cotton in the city of New Orleans, which will be shipped up the river at any moment that city may be endangered. The Northern press asserts and would make us believe t
Capitol (Utah, United States) (search for this): article 12
acquiescence in his rule, has had the temerity to send his armies into that State. Whilst they freely give offices and contracts to desperate leaders in the different towns and counties, they have as yet failed to reduce any considerable number of her sons into the ranks Nine-tenths of her young man are with the South. The Southern Army is advancing, and will are long drives from this ward Command wouldn't ... The patriots of Kentucky will soon meet on the sacred grounds overlooking her Capitol, and by the inspirations gathered from the inscriptions on the tombstones of her dead, will take possession of and re-organize her State Government, giving to it vital sparks which will cause it to last as long as that can be devised by the genius of man. The Confederates have from the beginning endeavored to restrict the war to as narrow limits as possible, in attempting only to hold defensive positions on their border, that their independence might be achieved with the smallest sac
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
imsy sophistry by which the Lincoln Government and press attempt to justify or excuse this usurpation and unnatural war. On the 6th of November, 1861, the United States was never so strong as a nation, never so prosperous, joyous and hopeful as a people. On that fatal day a majority of the American people, owing to divisions the chains. But, even after South Carolina had so wisely taken the initiative President Davis, then Senator from Mississippi, Senator Hunter, of Virginia, Confederate States Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and Senator Toombs, of Georgia, now a General in the Confederate army, asked only for reasonable constitutional guarantees an. For instance, Great Britain or France, by paying two, or at most three hundred thousand pounds per annum, would be entitled to unrestricted trade with the Confederate States, and their own tariff or revenue laws need not be in anywise deranged. To place the same amount of money in our treasury by any tariff on imports that we m
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 12
o assume the war debt, now about one hundred millions of dollars, thus removing every shackle on commerce and establishing a solute free trade. Commercial freedom would secure basting peace, and insure the highest state of civilization to as generous and chivalric a people as the world possesses. The nations having trade with us will be less taxed by assuming their proportion of our war indebtedness, than they would be by any tariff on imports that could be devised by us. For instance, Great Britain or France, by paying two, or at most three hundred thousand pounds per annum, would be entitled to unrestricted trade with the Confederate States, and their own tariff or revenue laws need not be in anywise deranged. To place the same amount of money in our treasury by any tariff on imports that we might impose would require a very large percentage to be added in consequence of our extensive frontier, inland and coastwise. Direct taxation can be relied on as all-sufficient for the ordi
Turin (Italy) (search for this): article 12
occupy Brunswick, Georgia. These were poorly defended points on our extensive Southern coast, but they were not of the slightest consequence commercially. The Yankee fleet may find tolerable anchorage, but not a bale of cotton or anything else material. The fact is there are but ten thousand bales of cotton in the city of New Orleans, which will be shipped up the river at any moment that city may be endangered. The Northern press asserts and would make us believe that Garibaldi contemplates coming to America. I cannot and will not believe it. Garibaldi, the Liberator of Italy, drawing his sword in behalf of the American Bombs, invading Virginia, the land of his great prototype, Washington, Pater PatriƦ! Much a course would be a burning and devouring lie to all of his eventful and hitherto glorious career. I write in great haste, omitting many things that I would like to speak of. Your friend, George N. Sanders To Louis Kossuth, Patriot Leader of Hungary, Turin, Italy.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 12
outh Carolina, more watchful and sagacious than the other States, declared her separation from a Union, the power of which was so soon to be used for her enslavement. It would have been imbecility and cowardice of the lowest character to have awaited the forging of the chains. But, even after South Carolina had so wisely taken the initiative President Davis, then Senator from Mississippi, Senator Hunter, of Virginia, Confederate States Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and Senator Toombs, of Georgia, now a General in the Confederate army, asked only for reasonable constitutional guarantees and pledges from the Lincoln administration, that the rights and interests of the Southern States and people should be held inviolable. Instead, however, of receiving such assurances they were met with nothing but jeers and defiant menace. The Republican aders, intoxicated by their success and thirsting to unlimited power, had not the patriotism of the common honesty to submit the ultimatum of the
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