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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 21
How long the contest will last no one can tell; but when it is announced that there is a cessation of hostilities, we hope to be able to announce that the flag of the Confederate States floats in triumph from the walls of Fort Pickens. East Tennessee. The following order has been promulgated by one of our Generals in East Tennessee: Headq'rs R brigade, Camp Look Out, Nov. 20th, 1861. Special Orders, No. 2. Martial law having been proclaimed at this post on the 14th daEast Tennessee: Headq'rs R brigade, Camp Look Out, Nov. 20th, 1861. Special Orders, No. 2. Martial law having been proclaimed at this post on the 14th day of November, by order of Col. S. A. M. Wood, the officer then in command, many disaffected persons were arrested and placed in custody of the proper military authorities for trial. The larger portion of these have voluntarily taken the prescribed oath of allegiance to the Confederate Government and were released, and returned to their homes. Those who were organized for active hostilities, have, for the most part, been dispersed, and driven beyond the limits of the State thus effectually bre
United States (United States) (search for this): article 21
over there the night previous was false. The Nelms in passing Billy's Wilson's batteries gave them a couple of shots, which were harmlessly returned. The United States frigate Niagara tried hard to come in, but the reception was too warm, and she had to back out. The only loss of life that we can hear of was a private of he contest will last no one can tell; but when it is announced that there is a cessation of hostilities, we hope to be able to announce that the flag of the Confederate States floats in triumph from the walls of Fort Pickens. East Tennessee. The following order has been promulgated by one of our Generals in East Tennesseven beyond the limits of the State thus effectually breaking up the conspiracy recently existing in this portion of the State to resist the authority of the Confederate States Government, and thereby restoring peace and quiet throughout the country adjacent to this post. The Commanding General, being satisfied from the evidences
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 21
ive inactivity in camp, has arrived, and the strength of the fortifications on each side will very likely be fully tested before either party will acknowledge a defeat. The works which have been erected by the Confederate forces have doubtless been constructed with great skill and care, and we should judge by this time they are in a condition to withstand the combined assaults of the fort and the Yankee fleet. This will be no child's play on either side. It will be no Hatteras or even a Port Royal affair. The Confederate forces are too strongly entrenched to entertain the idea of succumbing to any thing like an equal force. How long the contest will last no one can tell; but when it is announced that there is a cessation of hostilities, we hope to be able to announce that the flag of the Confederate States floats in triumph from the walls of Fort Pickens. East Tennessee. The following order has been promulgated by one of our Generals in East Tennessee: Headq'rs R bri
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 21
ng of Friday--Commencement of the second day's fight. The Observer, of the 23d inst., has the following: The firing, as we stated yesterday, began from Fort Pickens. The whole of their fire during the morning was directed at the steamer Time, out with very little effect. The Time came up last night, and with the exceptioperate Struggle expected — Pensacola Strongly Fortified. The Montgomery Advertiser, of the 24th, says: For more than six months past the garrisons at Fort Pickens and at Pensacola have faced each other, making preparations for the desperate struggle, which, for aught either knew, might be commenced at any moment; but the announced that there is a cessation of hostilities, we hope to be able to announce that the flag of the Confederate States floats in triumph from the walls of Fort Pickens. East Tennessee. The following order has been promulgated by one of our Generals in East Tennessee: Headq'rs R brigade, Camp Look Out, Nov. 20t
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 21
g or abetting its enemies, or in any way inciting rebellion, will be visited with all the rigors of military law. Wm. H. Carroll, Brigadier General Commanding. G. H. Monsarrat, Captain Artillery, A. Ass't Adj't General. Rumors at Fort Smith, Ark., about the movements of M'Culloch, &C. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 16th instant, says: Yesterday our town was thrown into a feverish excitement by rumors set afloat by the express rider from our army. It is said that he reFort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 16th instant, says: Yesterday our town was thrown into a feverish excitement by rumors set afloat by the express rider from our army. It is said that he reports Gen. McCulloch says in case he is forced to fall back, he will lay waste the whole country as he passes over it. That Col. McIntosh did so in Missouri for thirty miles--that Gen. McCulloch's army is small, too much so to meet the enemy, &c. Last week the same rumor reached here from Fayetteville, and we heard there that the people of that place were making preparations to leave. It was officially made known that all the roads leading over and through the country, except on Frog Bayo
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 21
Commanding. G. H. Monsarrat, Captain Artillery, A. Ass't Adj't General. Rumors at Fort Smith, Ark., about the movements of M'Culloch, &C. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 16th instant, says: Yesterday our town was thrown into a feverish excitement by rumors set afloat by the express rider from our army. It is said that he reports Gen. McCulloch says in case he is forced to fall back, he will lay waste the whole country as he passes over it. That Col. McIntosh did so in Missouri for thirty miles--that Gen. McCulloch's army is small, too much so to meet the enemy, &c. Last week the same rumor reached here from Fayetteville, and we heard there that the people of that place were making preparations to leave. It was officially made known that all the roads leading over and through the country, except on Frog Bayon, were to be blocked up with timber so as to be impassable. We should like to know the truth of these rumors, as they are having a very bad effect upon
, Brigadier General Commanding. G. H. Monsarrat, Captain Artillery, A. Ass't Adj't General. Rumors at Fort Smith, Ark., about the movements of M'Culloch, &C. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 16th instant, says: Yesterday our town was thrown into a feverish excitement by rumors set afloat by the express rider from our army. It is said that he reports Gen. McCulloch says in case he is forced to fall back, he will lay waste the whole country as he passes over it. That Col. McIntosh did so in Missouri for thirty miles--that Gen. McCulloch's army is small, too much so to meet the enemy, &c. Last week the same rumor reached here from Fayetteville, and we heard there that the people of that place were making preparations to leave. It was officially made known that all the roads leading over and through the country, except on Frog Bayon, were to be blocked up with timber so as to be impassable. We should like to know the truth of these rumors, as they are having
ersons who remain at home, submitting to the established laws of the country, will not be molested, whatever their previous political opinions may have been — but those found in arms against the Government, aiding or abetting its enemies, or in any way inciting rebellion, will be visited with all the rigors of military law. Wm. H. Carroll, Brigadier General Commanding. G. H. Monsarrat, Captain Artillery, A. Ass't Adj't General. Rumors at Fort Smith, Ark., about the movements of M'Culloch, &C. The Fort Smith (Ark.) Times, of the 16th instant, says: Yesterday our town was thrown into a feverish excitement by rumors set afloat by the express rider from our army. It is said that he reports Gen. McCulloch says in case he is forced to fall back, he will lay waste the whole country as he passes over it. That Col. McIntosh did so in Missouri for thirty miles--that Gen. McCulloch's army is small, too much so to meet the enemy, &c. Last week the same rumor reached he
is: A Mr. Mallone, who invented a cast iron gun which he wished to have introduced into the service, brought it to this city to be completed at the foundry of A. L. Maxwell. After finishing it, he concluded to try it on the plat between the foundry and the railroad depots, firing into the bank opposite the railroad. The recoil of the gun upon its discharge elevated the muzzle, and the ball, instead of going into the earth bank, went over the hill into the city, and through the house of Mr. Bradley, as above stated. A Furious Fighting Parson. A Columbus correspondent of the Montgomery Advertiser, describing the battle of Belmont, "gets rather heavily on" Parson Brady. Pity the good man should have got so very angry: It would be futile to particularize instances of bravery and desperate courage evinced by our gallant troops on the field. Let a few suffice. Parson Brady, of Tappan's regiment, after shooting two of the enemy, seized another by the shoulder, and with
o act to meet matters, as all is uncertain and in the dark. Dangerous practice — a cannon ball shot through a house. From the Knoxville Register, of the 24th, we take the following paragraph: A cannon ball yesterday went whizzing or whistling through the upper story of Horace Bradley's house, in this city, shattering things generally, and causing great consternation in the family, who were fortunately in the lower story at the time. The explanation of the affair is this: A Mr. Mallone, who invented a cast iron gun which he wished to have introduced into the service, brought it to this city to be completed at the foundry of A. L. Maxwell. After finishing it, he concluded to try it on the plat between the foundry and the railroad depots, firing into the bank opposite the railroad. The recoil of the gun upon its discharge elevated the muzzle, and the ball, instead of going into the earth bank, went over the hill into the city, and through the house of Mr. Bradley, as
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