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United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
ounties do not help to support the families of Chaplains; neither do boxes come to them filled with clothes and other necessaries. Never has a Government been more signally blessed by God since the days of the Hebrews, than that of the Confederate States. Let us not, therefore, dishonor Him in sending forth into our armies His ministers without due means of support. We know Chaplains who have been run into debt by the reduction of their payment who gave up posts of honor, and larger salars of honor, and larger salaries than our Government gave at first to the Chaplains, that they might serve in its armies. Shall such men be forced to resign ? The United States gives its Chaplains a sufficient support some $130 per month. Our patriotic "Chaplain Without Pay" suggests that if a Chaplain is of the right figure, the men will give "something extra to his support." Our opinion is that a Chaplain who would receive "something extra" from any of our under paid privates is a man
t of its writer, who trumpets his own good deeds to the world, but we cannot for one moment allow the supposition that other Chaplains are wanting in patriotism because they desire, in return for their services a sufficient pay to support their necessary camp expenses and their families at home. If the amount of pay that those receive who have left home and all that is dear to them, to defend our beloved country, is to be the criterion of one's patriotism, then our brave and able Generals, Johnston, Beauregard, Lee, and Cooper, are the least patriotic of our heroic band of soldiers. We trust that such twaddle will not deceive many sensible men. Men, in every department of life, whose services are worth having are worth well paying for. Fifty dollars per month, we grant, is amply sufficient for young, unmarried man. But must all of our Chaplains be of that class? Are such men as a whole, men of experience, learning, and well qualified to thoroughly perform the arduous duties of a
John M. Lee (search for this): article 6
trumpets his own good deeds to the world, but we cannot for one moment allow the supposition that other Chaplains are wanting in patriotism because they desire, in return for their services a sufficient pay to support their necessary camp expenses and their families at home. If the amount of pay that those receive who have left home and all that is dear to them, to defend our beloved country, is to be the criterion of one's patriotism, then our brave and able Generals, Johnston, Beauregard, Lee, and Cooper, are the least patriotic of our heroic band of soldiers. We trust that such twaddle will not deceive many sensible men. Men, in every department of life, whose services are worth having are worth well paying for. Fifty dollars per month, we grant, is amply sufficient for young, unmarried man. But must all of our Chaplains be of that class? Are such men as a whole, men of experience, learning, and well qualified to thoroughly perform the arduous duties of a Chaplain ? What ha
Beauregard (search for this): article 6
iter, who trumpets his own good deeds to the world, but we cannot for one moment allow the supposition that other Chaplains are wanting in patriotism because they desire, in return for their services a sufficient pay to support their necessary camp expenses and their families at home. If the amount of pay that those receive who have left home and all that is dear to them, to defend our beloved country, is to be the criterion of one's patriotism, then our brave and able Generals, Johnston, Beauregard, Lee, and Cooper, are the least patriotic of our heroic band of soldiers. We trust that such twaddle will not deceive many sensible men. Men, in every department of life, whose services are worth having are worth well paying for. Fifty dollars per month, we grant, is amply sufficient for young, unmarried man. But must all of our Chaplains be of that class? Are such men as a whole, men of experience, learning, and well qualified to thoroughly perform the arduous duties of a Chaplain ?
extremely rigid economy be exercised only in regard to Chaplains, the ministers of that God whom we all profess to worship? There is not a young lieutenant in the army who does not receive nearly twice as much as any of our Chaplains. The other commissioned officers of the army are generously paid, and we are glad that it is so. Most of them are men of substance; chaplains are rarely otherwise than very poor. We will not argue the question that in a Christian country the ministers of Christ should serve in its armies, to restrain vice and irreligion, for our Government has already decided that there shall be Chaplains. Let them then have a proper support. A large number have already been forced to resign.--At the present enormous prices of clothes, shoes, and other necessaries, after the Chaplain has paid his mess expenses, he will not have the $11.00 at the end of the month that always comes to the private. Counties do not help to support the families of Chaplains; neither
his own good deeds to the world, but we cannot for one moment allow the supposition that other Chaplains are wanting in patriotism because they desire, in return for their services a sufficient pay to support their necessary camp expenses and their families at home. If the amount of pay that those receive who have left home and all that is dear to them, to defend our beloved country, is to be the criterion of one's patriotism, then our brave and able Generals, Johnston, Beauregard, Lee, and Cooper, are the least patriotic of our heroic band of soldiers. We trust that such twaddle will not deceive many sensible men. Men, in every department of life, whose services are worth having are worth well paying for. Fifty dollars per month, we grant, is amply sufficient for young, unmarried man. But must all of our Chaplains be of that class? Are such men as a whole, men of experience, learning, and well qualified to thoroughly perform the arduous duties of a Chaplain ? What have the marr