hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 20 2 Browse Search
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
DeVilliers 13 5 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 2, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Big Lick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
exchange for scant cartloads of crooked wood and are measuring in advance the dimensions of the "pile" which they expect to receive from the immense profits upon their wood-pile, all such gay dreams of ill-gotten gains should be no longer indulged in. There are millions of cords of wood in this section of country — mostly standing, but much of it cut, split, and piled up ready for market; and arrangements are now being made to keep this indispensable article at a reasonable advance upon the cost. A large number of the visitors who came to attend the conference have embraced opportunities to see the Navy-Yard, the fortifications, &c.; hundreds will leave to-day by the Norfolk and Petersburg road, and a large number left this morning on the Seaboard and Roanoke read. Our city is quiet now, the weather fine and an increasing interest and variety given to the numberless sounds that fill the air of the city, by heavy discharges of great guns at some of the fortifications below.
Fernando Wood (search for this): article 4
The supply of Wood — no chance for the speculators — the members of the conference Visiting the Navy-Yard — the weather. Norfolk Nov. 29, 1861. It has been supposed by many persons that in consequence of the high price and scarcity of coal, and the heartlessness of speculators, the price of fire-wood this winter would be exceedingly high — some thought it would sell at $8 to $12 per cord. Wood at these prices would be beyond the reach of the poor, and such an advance on this article of necessity and life would be a calamity, of course. But wood will never be sold at such high rates in this market, unless the railroads, canals, creeks, and common roads are all blockaded if, there fore, any persons entertain fears of freezing this winter about this locality for the want of a little fire to warm them, let all such abandon their fears; and if there are any of the speculators who are counting up in advance the carloads of shinplasters they hope to receive in exchange for scant
November 29th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
The supply of Wood — no chance for the speculators — the members of the conference Visiting the Navy-Yard — the weather. Norfolk Nov. 29, 1861. It has been supposed by many persons that in consequence of the high price and scarcity of coal, and the heartlessness of speculators, the price of fire-wood this winter would be exceedingly high — some thought it would sell at $8 to $12 per cord. Wood at these prices would be beyond the reach of the poor, and such an advance on this article of necessity and life would be a calamity, of course. But wood will never be sold at such high rates in this market, unless the railroads, canals, creeks, and common roads are all blockaded if, there fore, any persons entertain fears of freezing this winter about this locality for the want of a little fire to warm them, let all such abandon their fears; and if there are any of the speculators who are counting up in advance the carloads of shinplasters they hope to receive in exchange for scant