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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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November 16th (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
July, 11 AD (search for this): article 6
atch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and know
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
Macfarland (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which inMessrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great
William Scott (search for this): article 6
to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and knowing that the ports of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland, in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admitted to all the courtesies and protection vessels of the
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which inSlidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great
Nash Taylor (search for this): article 6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great B
France (France) (search for this): article 6
Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and knowing that the ports of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland, in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admitted to all the courtesies and protection vessels of the United States receive, every aid and attention beings from the other belligerent to permit them to pass free." Report and assumption gave them the title of Ministers to France and England, but inasmuch as they had not been received by either of these powers, I did not conceive they had immunity asel; his father had visited them, and introduced them as ministers of the Confederate States, on their way to England and France. They went in the steamer with the knowledge and consent of the captain, who endeavored afterwards to conceal them b
Cienfuegos (Cuba) (search for this): article 6
lowing is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, and that they were at Havana, and would depart in the English steamer of the 7th of November, I determined to intercept them, and carefully examined all the authorities on international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibil
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