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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fishing Creek (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 17
oying all the rolling stock of the Louisville and Nashville road in forwarding troops and supplies. All the bridges are repaired and trains are running through to Mumfordsville. Six new Ohio regiments will pass through Cincinnati this week for Kentucky. The Postmaster at Somerset writes under date of the 13th, that both armies are on the defensive, and fortifying. A gentleman, in the confidence of General Schoepff, writes (same date) that Gen. Zollicoffer is fortifying at Fishing Creek, five miles west of Somerset. Dr. John Jackson, without provocation, shot and severely wounded a Minnesota soldier, who went to his house, near Springfield, to buy hay. Jackson was arrested, taken to Lebanon, and probably tried by military law. He was a Douglas elector of the Ashland district, and a brother of him who shot Ellsworth. Vague rumors are afloat of a fight at Mumfordsville, between General McCook's division and the enemy, but they are not credited. Paris, Ky.,
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): article 17
aval force which England can immediately bring to operate against us, should hostilities actually take place. In this connection it is interesting to exhibit the strength of her fleets in the waters of North American and the West Indies, the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean, as their united force will, no doubt, operate against us in the event of war. With this view we publish the following statement of the British North American and West India fleet: Recapitulation of the British naval force. Designation of fleet.Vessel.Guns.Men. N. American and W. I.307148,075 Gulf of Mexico43192,210 Pacific204274,160 Grand total541,86014,445 Congressional proceedings. Washington, Dec. 16. --In the Senate a number of petitions touching upon the slavery question were presented. Mr. Ten Eyck, of N. Y., offered a resolution against radicalism in any sense, which was laid over. The Committee on Military Affairs, on motion of Mr. Hale, of New Hampshire, was instruc
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 17
ct, but says that however much John Bull may bluster and try to bluff the Cabinet at Washington, he cannot afford to fight. The confiscation of debts and loss of Canada will make England pay the expenses of the war. The Washington correspondent of the Herald says that the Cabinet was in session several hours on Tuesday, discGovernment in regard to Slidell and Mason is expected at the beginning of diplomatic correspondence on the subject. The European news — how it is received in Canada and in the United States. In Canada. Montreal, Monday, Dec. 16. --The news from England by the Europa and the City of Washington creates much excitement.Canada. Montreal, Monday, Dec. 16. --The news from England by the Europa and the City of Washington creates much excitement. There is a strong British feeling throughout the Province. Toronto, Monday, Dec. 16.--The English news causes intense excitement, and the action of the Home Government is strongly approved. In the United States. Philadelphia, Monday, Dec. 16. --The money article of the Bulletin, of this city, says: "The f
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 17
ion of the authorities. An attack on the town by the rebels is momentarily expected. Reinforcements have been sent for. At this hour (8 P. M.) all is quiet. Louisville, Ky., Dec. 14. --Last Thursday Company I, of the Ohio 15th regiment, were attacked by a company of dismounted rebels, who fired one volley at them. The Unionists replied with two volleys, wounding several of the rebels, when they retired, carrying off their wounded. None of the Unionists were hurt. News from Western Virginia--proceedings of the Convention. Wheeling, Dec. 15. --The Convention has disposed of the boundary question. They include, unconditionally, an addition to the 39 counties included by the ordinance of the August Convention, viz: The counties of Pocahontas, Greenbrier, Monroe, Mercer, and McDowell. They also have taken in Hampshire, Morgan, Berkley, Jefferson, Pendleton, and Frederick, on the condition that a majority of the votes cast in the District, and a majority of the counti
Otterville, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 17
that another large body of troops were expected to reach there yesterday. Gen. Prentiss, it is said, was on the north side of the river, with 3,000 Federal troops, and had thrown a few shell into the rebel camp and destroyed one of the two ferry-boats in their hands. This informant says he heard heavy firing after leaving Lexington on Friday, indicating that an engagement was progressing between our forces and the rebels, also, that General Davis's brigade of Federal troops left Otterville on Friday for Lexington. These statements need confirmation. The rebel Captain Sweeny and 63 other rebel prisoners reached here last night. The last instalment of the Camp Jackson prisoners were sent to Cairo last night, to be forwarded to Columbus. Sedalia, Mo., Dec. 14.-- Parties from the West arrived here, report that 3,000 rebel troops, under General Stein, passed a point fifteen miles from Warrensburg on the 11th, evidently for the purpose of escorting some 600 or 800
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 17
ainst us in the event of war. With this view we publish the following statement of the British North American and West India fleet: Recapitulation of the British naval force. Designation of fleet.Vessel.Guns.Men. N. American and W. I.307148,075 Gulf of Mexico43192,210 Pacific204274,160 Grand total541,86014,445 Congressional proceedings. Washington, Dec. 16. --In the Senate a number of petitions touching upon the slavery question were presented. Mr. Ten Eyck, of N. Y., offered a resolution against radicalism in any sense, which was laid over. The Committee on Military Affairs, on motion of Mr. Hale, of New Hampshire, was instructed to inquire into the expediency of providing a uniform manner in which to deal with the slaves of the rebels. The Committee on the Judiciary were instructed to prepare a law to prevent the aiders and abetters of treason from bringing suits for the collection of debts in the United States Courts. Mr. Wilkinson, of
United States (United States) (search for this): article 17
s the British Government might make of the United States, the Confederate Commissioners should neve — how it is received in Canada and in the United States. In Canada. Montreal, Monday, Dec. 16. vernment is strongly approved. In the United States. Philadelphia, Monday, Dec. 16. --nment to rush headlong into a war with the United States than there is on our part to provoke a warprobable collision between England and the United States, the New York Herald, of the 16th inst., tg suits for the collection of debts in the United States Courts. Mr. Wilkinson, of Minnesota, iming to be Ambassadors from the seceded Confederate States; and Whereas, The Secretary of the ates, captured and held by the so-called Confederate States, should be treated as prisoners of war: ourage of the Government and people of the United States against a foreign Power. Mr. Vallandiis understood here that the Captain of the United States gun-boat Iroquois will be brought to rigid[2 more...]
France (France) (search for this): article 17
tter of speculation than of wisdom. It is thought that stocks will rise to-morrow in New York. The Administration is understood to be expecting possibly a war with the Navajos, but it has not began to think a war possible with either England or France. No ultimatum from England. The rumors of a messenger arriving posthaste, with dispatches for Lord Lyons, are false. No ultimatum from the English Government in regard to Slidell and Mason is expected at the beginning of diplomatic corrierro, where she obtained a supply from English merchants. The Sumter had been received with courtesy at the seat of Government, and Capt. Palmer discovered, to use his own language, that "this farce of non-recognition of the Confederate flag by France and England, is played out." He had a correspondence with the Governor, the result of which was be was referred to a paragraph of Wheaton's International Law, to the effect that no belligerent could depart from port until twenty-four hours after
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 17
a profound sensation in commercial and financial circles, and the impression seems general that there is danger of a war with Great Britain; but while all admit that if Capt. Wilkes did wrong in the Trent affair, due apology should be made; but if right, no humiliating concession ought to be entertained for a moment to England or any other Power. The news greatly unsettled the markets, and produced a temporary cessation of business, so that there was little done in any department. Hartford, Dec. 16.--The European news caused great excitement in this city for a time, but the unanimous feeling was that England's demands for Mason and Slidell could not be listened to for a moment. The sober second thought is that our Government should be firm but conciliatory, but if the alternative is to give up the Commissioners or fight, then fight. Buffalo, Monday, Dec. 16.--The English news received here last night caused considerable excitement on the street. The prevailing opinion
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 17
ands the British Government might make of the United States, the Confederate Commissioners should never be surrendered. This is a fixed fact. The Bank Convention assembled in New York on the 16th inst., and decided not to suspend specie payment. The Herald says, however, that the decision was not final. One bank has already suspended, and it is thought others will soon follow. A telegraphic dispatch from Port Royal to the New York Herald says that three thousand negroes from South Carolina have sought protection at the hands of the Federal forces, and that they have already picked two millions pounds of cotton for the U. States Government. An article in the same paper says that Gen. Butler is landing at Ship Island, and that the Federal coll is surely crushing out the Southern rebellion. The English brig Mary Morton reports that the privateer Sumter and the Federal gun-boat Iroquois had a severe engagement, and one of them is now at Martinique for repairs. This
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