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Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
sses were required to become security that the oath would be kept. Those refusing to take it are set to work on an adjacent hill upon fortifications. The Little Rock Journal says that a letter from Fayetteville conveys the intelligence Gen. Price had engaged the Yankees at Rolla, and routed them. No particulars are given. The fight at Woodsonville — fall of Col. Terry--interesting particulars. The Nashville Banner has a full account of the fight in Kentucky, in the region of Green river, already reported by telegraph, from which we subjoin the following additional particulars: At dawn on Tuesday morning, a body of men, consisting in part of Sweet's Artillery and a fragment of Col. Terry's Rangers, was ordered forward from Cave City, near which they were encamped. They proceeded towards Woodsonville, and, after they had passed the deep cut on this side of the depot and Dirt Road Bridge, they found a party of the enemy. It was in the outskirts of Woodsonville. The
Cave City (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
ngaged the Yankees at Rolla, and routed them. No particulars are given. The fight at Woodsonville — fall of Col. Terry--interesting particulars. The Nashville Banner has a full account of the fight in Kentucky, in the region of Green river, already reported by telegraph, from which we subjoin the following additional particulars: At dawn on Tuesday morning, a body of men, consisting in part of Sweet's Artillery and a fragment of Col. Terry's Rangers, was ordered forward from Cave City, near which they were encamped. They proceeded towards Woodsonville, and, after they had passed the deep cut on this side of the depot and Dirt Road Bridge, they found a party of the enemy. It was in the outskirts of Woodsonville. They had learned that the enemy had boasted that they intended cutting off "Terry and his d — d wild cats." This Col. Terry endeavored to defeat by turning a gap in an adjacent fence and unflanking them.--But in this attempt was unsuccessful, as was also an ef
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
nd a private. Yesterday (the 7th) a battalion of cavalry went on a scouting expedition towards Somerset, where their forces are entrenched behind breastworks. Their picket was composed of about fiftthe prisoners. Exciting news from Kentucky--Gen. Schoepff Falling back — Citizens leaving Somerset. The Louisville (Ky.) Democrat, (Rep.,) of the 8th inst., publishes the following letters ftanford, Ky., Dec. 6, 1861. Editors Democrat:--Gentlemen: The stage has just arrived from Somerset, loaded with ladies and children fleeing for their lives. All the Federal troops under Gen. Schoepff have been compelled to retreat on this side of Somerset, and all the rebels, twelve thousand in number, have crossed Cumberland river, and are marching to Somerset. Everybody that can leave haSomerset. Everybody that can leave has come here in boggles, wagons, ox-carts, and anything to get off with their families. The report is true, and can be relied on, as I have it from several ladies of undoubted veracity. Our people he
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
Knoxville Register says these nests will soon be broken up. Order from Gen. Huger concerning Letters sent to Yankee land. For the information of the public, we inert the following order: Headq's Department of Norfolk, Norfolk, Va., Dec. 26, 1861. Hereafter no letter exceeding one page of or tinary-sized letter paper will be sent to the United States by flag of truce. Benj. Huger, Jr., 1st Lieutenant and A. D. C. A Patriarchal Patriot. The Louisville (Bowling Green) Courier, of the 17th inst., says: We were informed yesterday by a gentleman who knows the party and many of her descendants, that there is at present living in Loudoun county, Va., a lady named Mrs. Rosset, now nearly one hundred years of age who has no less than seventy-six of her descendants — children, grand children and great grand children, serving their country in the Confederate army. Numbers of her family live in Kentucky--Mr. A. K. Long, of Union county, being one
United States (United States) (search for this): article 14
his word, and administered the obligation to 800 persons, in the following words: United States of America, State of Missouri. I do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the l and the State Governments; that I will not take up arms against the Government of the United States of America, or of the Provisional Government of the State of Missouri; that I will not aid or assil, or give information to or in any manner whatever encourage the enemies either of the United States of America or of the Provisional Government of the State of Missouri; and that I will, in all respects, conduct myself as a loyal citizen both of the United States and of the Provisional Government of the State of Missouri; and I will do all in my power as an American citizen to discourage the pr Hereafter no letter exceeding one page of or tinary-sized letter paper will be sent to the United States by flag of truce. Benj. Huger, Jr., 1st Lieutenant and A. D. C. A Patriarchal
Woodville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
Latest Southern news. affairs in Missouri--the fight at Woodville--Gen. Zollicoffer--exciting news from Kentucky, &c. The following summary of news is made up from the latest Southern exchanges which have come to hand. We commend it to the attention of our readers: The War in Missouri--stirring Proclamations from Gov. Jackson and Gen. Jeff. Thompson--the Union cause dying out, &c. Gov. Jackson, of Missouri, has recently issued a stirring proclamation to the officers and soldiers of the Missouri State Guard and the citizens generally of that State. It breathes the very spirit of patriotism and chivalry, as the concluding paragraphs, which we commend to our readers, will show: My brave soldiers now in the field — The six months for which you were called is now expiring, and many may desire to return to their homes. It is natural you should desire to do so, but let me beg you not now to turn back from the work you have so nobly begun; do not now fail, when
New Madrid, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 14
eir sympathies, their hopes and their interests are with the South. Then I call upon you, in the name of our noble State, now struggling for independence, to come out and help your brothers who are in the field. You cannot ask or expect them to do all the fighting, to endure all the hardships, and divide with you their glory and successes; you should not expect to enjoy the reward unless you participate in their struggles and privations for victory and independence. C. F. Jackson. New Madrid, Mo., Dec. 13, 1861. In connection with the above, we append the following characteristic production from Gen. Jeff. Thompson: Headquarters 1st Military Dis, M. S. G., New Madrid, Dec. 14, 1861. Fellow-soldiers and Citizens of the First Military District of Missouri: You have read our Governor's appeal. How do you respond? Will not the brave men who have done so much work, and gained so much credit during the past six months, rally around the flag he so beautifully desc
Valley Forge (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
and unity of purpose exist, which in sires success, it has been determined that the present members of the Missouri State Guard shall have the liberty to reorganize under the laws of the Southern Confederacy--that our Southern brothers may have the privilege of supplying our wants and paying our troops, while we fight our battles which are also theirs. Do not let the frosts of winter deter you from embracing the opportunity. Do not fall to remember those patriotic sires who wintered at Valley Forge — let their bright example encourage you — the cause is the same--'tis liberty and equality for which we fight. Not so with the enemy. We seek not his subjugation, his country, or his home. He can quit the field, retire to his home, and thereby give peace and happiness to a bleeding and suffering country. He can by these means, at once close the unrelenting crusade which he is now waging against us. You have no homes to which you can safely go — the Hessian and the Jayhawker <
Woodsonville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
a letter from Fayetteville conveys the intelligence Gen. Price had engaged the Yankees at Rolla, and routed them. No particulars are given. The fight at Woodsonville — fall of Col. Terry--interesting particulars. The Nashville Banner has a full account of the fight in Kentucky, in the region of Green river, already reporin part of Sweet's Artillery and a fragment of Col. Terry's Rangers, was ordered forward from Cave City, near which they were encamped. They proceeded towards Woodsonville, and, after they had passed the deep cut on this side of the depot and Dirt Road Bridge, they found a party of the enemy. It was in the outskirts of WoodsonviWoodsonville. They had learned that the enemy had boasted that they intended cutting off "Terry and his d — d wild cats." This Col. Terry endeavored to defeat by turning a gap in an adjacent fence and unflanking them.--But in this attempt was unsuccessful, as was also an effort to plant Sweet's battery.--Before other preparations could be
Coffee county, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 14
onths there has been no steamer at all, and only one respectable sail vessel, aided by two or three small schooners. What does England think of such a blockade? Tennessee items. We learn from the Clarksville Jeffersonian that a number of free persons of color have volunteered their services to assist in nursing the sick at the military hospital in that place, and are rendering valuable aid in that way. The Nashville Gazette states that the powder mills of Mr. Whiteman, in Coffee county, is now turning out 2,000 pounds of powder per day. It is said to be of the best quality for military purposes. The Lincolnites are in strong force in the adjoining Kentucky counties, whence, in considerable numbers, they make frequent raids into Campbell, Scott and Claiborne counties, Tenn., stealing negroes and horses, and sometimes capturing citizens. The Knoxville Register says these nests will soon be broken up. Order from Gen. Huger concerning Letters sent to Yankee land
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