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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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December 30th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
From Nashville. will Gen. Buell attack Gen. Johnston?--anxiety of the Confederates for a fight — importance of Defeating the Yankees — the news from England. [special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Nashville, Dec. 30, 1861. Will General Buell with his forty, fifty, or sixty thousand men, or with whatever force he has — for it is variously estimated from forty to eighty thousand--attack General Johnston at Bowling Green, or at any other strong position this side of Green river?--That is the question justing of greatest interest in this part of the country. According to rumor, a battle has been imminent every day for more than a week past.--Many of our citizens, who had ambition to see a fight and to have a hand in one, left their peaceful vocations, and went to Bowling Green a few days ago, under the full conviction they would be gratified. They returned, however, without smelling gunpowder. There is a continual flow and ebb of public opinion, with respect to a <
From Nashville. will Gen. Buell attack Gen. Johnston?--anxiety of the Confederates for a fight — importance of Defeating the Yankees — the news from England. [special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Nashville, Dec. 30, 1861. Will General Buell with his forty, fifty, or sixty thousand men, or with whatever force he has — for it is variously estimated from forty to eighty thousand--attack General Johnston at Bowling Green, or at any other strong position this side of Green ri. To-morrow, perhaps, news may be brought in of the movements of troops that would creates another excitement. In fact, Buell and Johnston are checkmating each other in Kentucky, just as McClellan and Johnston have been doing in Virginia for some d this city occupies a position strategically and geographically as important as Richmond. On the other hand, should Buell's army be routed the way would be open to Lexington and Frankfort, and may be to Louisville and Covington. Thus, it will<
From Nashville. will Gen. Buell attack Gen. Johnston?--anxiety of the Confederates for a fight — importance of Defeating the Yankees — the news from Englan has — for it is variously estimated from forty to eighty thousand--attack General Johnston at Bowling Green, or at any other strong position this side of Green rivermovements of troops that would creates another excitement. In fact, Buell and Johnston are checkmating each other in Kentucky, just as McClellan and Johnston have beJohnston have been doing in Virginia for some time past. The line of communication on which their armies rest is scarcely less important than that from Washington to Richmond. Should Johnston be defeated, Nashville would be in danger, and this city occupies a position strategically and geographically as important as Richmond. On the other s this. For these reasons I do think the Federal Commander will not attack Gen. Johnston's army at Bowling Green, or in any other position where he might be likely <
McClellan (search for this): article 2
aceful vocations, and went to Bowling Green a few days ago, under the full conviction they would be gratified. They returned, however, without smelling gunpowder. There is a continual flow and ebb of public opinion, with respect to a battle.--Now, again, it is thought, there will not be one on that line. To-morrow, perhaps, news may be brought in of the movements of troops that would creates another excitement. In fact, Buell and Johnston are checkmating each other in Kentucky, just as McClellan and Johnston have been doing in Virginia for some time past. The line of communication on which their armies rest is scarcely less important than that from Washington to Richmond. Should Johnston be defeated, Nashville would be in danger, and this city occupies a position strategically and geographically as important as Richmond. On the other hand, should Buell's army be routed the way would be open to Lexington and Frankfort, and may be to Louisville and Covington. Thus, it will b
Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
From Nashville. will Gen. Buell attack Gen. Johnston?--anxiety of the Confederates for a fight — importance of Defeating the Yankees — the news from England. [special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Nashville, Dec. 30, 1861. Will General Buell with his forty, fifty, or sixty thousand men, or with whatever force he has — for it is variously estimated from forty to eighty thousand--attack General Johnston at Bowling Green, or at any other strong position this side of Green river?--That is the question justing of greatest interest in this part of the country. According to rumor, a battle has been imminent every day for more than a week past.--Many of our citizens, who had ambition to see a fight and to have a hand in one, left their peaceful vocations, and went to Bowling Green a few days ago, under the full conviction they would be gratified. They returned, however, without smelling gunpowder. There is a continual flow and ebb of public opinion, with respect to a<
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
dence of the Dispatch.] Nashville, Dec. 30, 1861. Will General Buell with his forty, fifty, or sixty thousand men, or with whatever force he has — for it is variously estimated from forty to eighty thousand--attack General Johnston at Bowling Green, or at any other strong position this side of Green river?--That is the question justing of greatest interest in this part of the country. According to rumor, a battle has been imminent every day for more than a week past.--Many of our citizens, who had ambition to see a fight and to have a hand in one, left their peaceful vocations, and went to Bowling Green a few days ago, under the full conviction they would be gratified. They returned, however, without smelling gunpowder. There is a continual flow and ebb of public opinion, with respect to a battle.--Now, again, it is thought, there will not be one on that line. To-morrow, perhaps, news may be brought in of the movements of troops that would creates another excitement. In
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
erience of the war shows this. For these reasons I do think the Federal Commander will not attack Gen. Johnston's army at Bowling Green, or in any other position where he might be likely to accept a general engagement, and, therefore, I adhere to the opinion that there will be no great battle in that part of the State, unless it be demanded from Washington, as the battle of Manassas was. Another subject of great interest which occupies the public mind is that of the trouble between Great Britain and the United States. Every telegraphic dispatch to the press of Nashville is eagerly looked for, and devoted with avidity. We were rejoicing until the last day or two over the prospect of war between the two countries, but the lest news from Washington has checked our joy. The bragging Yankees begin to shake at the knees before the growl of the old lion. We fear that Mr. Secretary Welles will swallow his Wilkes's letter of approval, and Congress will eat its own words. England may,
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
ws this. For these reasons I do think the Federal Commander will not attack Gen. Johnston's army at Bowling Green, or in any other position where he might be likely to accept a general engagement, and, therefore, I adhere to the opinion that there will be no great battle in that part of the State, unless it be demanded from Washington, as the battle of Manassas was. Another subject of great interest which occupies the public mind is that of the trouble between Great Britain and the United States. Every telegraphic dispatch to the press of Nashville is eagerly looked for, and devoted with avidity. We were rejoicing until the last day or two over the prospect of war between the two countries, but the lest news from Washington has checked our joy. The bragging Yankees begin to shake at the knees before the growl of the old lion. We fear that Mr. Secretary Welles will swallow his Wilkes's letter of approval, and Congress will eat its own words. England may, however, under the in
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
. But the Federals have had too many defeats with inferior numbers against them to face our troops in anything like a strong position. If they could-fight us in detail before their own entrenchments, or draw us into weak situations, they might venture an engagement with their superior force. I have no idea they will fight under other circumstances. Indeed, the experience of the war shows this. For these reasons I do think the Federal Commander will not attack Gen. Johnston's army at Bowling Green, or in any other position where he might be likely to accept a general engagement, and, therefore, I adhere to the opinion that there will be no great battle in that part of the State, unless it be demanded from Washington, as the battle of Manassas was. Another subject of great interest which occupies the public mind is that of the trouble between Great Britain and the United States. Every telegraphic dispatch to the press of Nashville is eagerly looked for, and devoted with avidi
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
Kentucky, just as McClellan and Johnston have been doing in Virginia for some time past. The line of communication on which their armies rest is scarcely less important than that from Washington to Richmond. Should Johnston be defeated, Nashville would be in danger, and this city occupies a position strategically and geographically as important as Richmond. On the other hand, should Buell's army be routed the way would be open to Lexington and Frankfort, and may be to Louisville and Covington. Thus, it will be seen what powerful motives these Generals have not to risk a decisive battle unless well assured of success. Had our Commander a force equal to that of the enemy he would undoubtedly advance and force a battle or a retreat. But the Federals have had too many defeats with inferior numbers against them to face our troops in anything like a strong position. If they could-fight us in detail before their own entrenchments, or draw us into weak situations, they might ventur
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