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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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China (China) (search for this): article 1
spired, it is the North which is growing fierce and bloodthirsty; it is the high professing Puritians who threaten to murder in cold blood; it is the citizens of New York and Boston, claiming credit for civilization and literary to see, who are exulting in the commission of wanton destruction. War is terrible enough at best, but even war has its mitigations among civilized men. We do not in Europe when we take a city out the throats of all the women and children, as the Taipings have done in China; neither do we burn down the city and sow salt upon the site, as was sometimes done even in Europe in barbarous days. We do not torture our prisoners after the manner described in Mr. Cooper's redskin novels. As civilized and Christian men, we put some bridle over the worst instincts of our animal nature, even in our moments of most intense excitement.--There are things we are ashamed to do in the heat of conflict, and we count that man a mere villain who when there is no fight raging can
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
to come, the channels of entry by sea to those cursed cities, Charleston and Savannah." The object is to strangle these great ports of commerce; not to repossess them, but to destroy them for all time. "Of the effectiveness of such a stone blockade," writes the exulting journalists of New York, "there can be no doubt. The main ship channel leading to Savannah is but two hundred and fifty yards across the narrowest place, and can be perfectly barren by half a dozen of these vessels. Charleston harbor is equally eligible to the same treatment. Once sunk, these old hulks become points for the accumulation of alluvials which the rivers bear down, and of the sands which the tides carry back. There is a natural tendency in such ports to form obstructions, and all we have to do is, as the physicians say, to 'assist nature.' "Becoming thoroughly imbedded in the sand, these accumulations but advance with time, forming unconquerable obstacles to reopening the harbors, and establishin
ng credit for civilization and literary to see, who are exulting in the commission of wanton destruction. War is terrible enough at best, but even war has its mitigations among civilized men. We do not in Europe when we take a city out the throats of all the women and children, as the Taipings have done in China; neither do we burn down the city and sow salt upon the site, as was sometimes done even in Europe in barbarous days. We do not torture our prisoners after the manner described in Mr. Cooper's redskin novels. As civilized and Christian men, we put some bridle over the worst instincts of our animal nature, even in our moments of most intense excitement.--There are things we are ashamed to do in the heat of conflict, and we count that man a mere villain who when there is no fight raging can enjoy revenge without danger and can feel a ferocious joy in the infliction of suffering. There are bad signs in the recent news from America. Already have the Northern Government thre
r, expect every day to hear that some one of these prisoners has died under the hardships he is enduring, and that a prisoner on the other side has been publicly hanged to revenge his death. If this dreadful play of death for death is once begun, it must go on till the prisons are emptied on both sides, and the war between the Anglo-Saxon Americans will be like a war of cannibals. Again, there are limits to the rights of destruction which even a nation at war may exercise. We read in Grotius, and other writers apon the state of war and peace, that all people who deserve the name of a nation have in all times respected things which are beneficial to the whole human race. Thus there is a rule derived from the authority of Holy Writ that fruit trees shall be spared wherever found. The implements of the husbandman have also been held sacred. To conquer, and not to destroy, is the right of a beligerent nation of civilized beings. Yet we are told, with a dastardly exultation, that
calling themselves civilized to have even contemplated. It is terrible alike for whites and for blacks; for it seems that, after exciting these black men to work out this unmanly revenge, the North does not propose to endure their presence. Mr. Lincoln, like one of the despots of the Old World, undertakes to transport the whole race, slave and free, to some territory which no white man desires, but which Mr. Lincoln will buy for them, that he may never more behold a sable face. All thesMr. Lincoln will buy for them, that he may never more behold a sable face. All these things are, as yet, but in their commencement. Some are only threatened; others are only tentatively begun. They promise, however, in their development, such scenes of horror as the world has never seen since men fought like wild beasts. Against such methods of war we protest at the outset. Against bloody reprisals, against the wanton destruction of those harbors which a beneficent Creator has given for the enjoyment of all His creatures, against incitations to domestic rapine and murder,
December 19th (search for this): article 1
American Affairs in England.an English Glance at the Stone Fleet. [from the London times, Dec. 19.] The longer the civil war in America lasts, the more evident becomes the signs that it is brutalizing at least one of the combatants.--If we had opportunities of watching the deeds of the Confederates as closely as we follow those of the Federals, we might possibly find that the progress towards savage vengeance is not very unequal in both parties. So far, however, as events have publicly transpired, it is the North which is growing fierce and bloodthirsty; it is the high professing Puritians who threaten to murder in cold blood; it is the citizens of New York and Boston, claiming credit for civilization and literary to see, who are exulting in the commission of wanton destruction. War is terrible enough at best, but even war has its mitigations among civilized men. We do not in Europe when we take a city out the throats of all the women and children, as the Taipings have done i