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Fort Barrancas (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
Interesting particulars of the last bombardment at Warrenten. The Mobile Evening News publishes an interesting letter from Fort Barrancas, dated January 2, from which we gather the following particulars of the late fight which took place at Pensacola: A few days ago permission was granted the little propeller Cushman, vulgarly known as the "Shorter," to trade between the Navy-Yard and Pensacola. She started yesterday on her first trip, and about 2 ½ o'clock P. M. made fast to the Cee Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantry; by Capts. Baker, Posey, and the entire line of batteries of the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity that of the action of the 22d November. The Y
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
ck P. M. made fast to the Central wharf, being the first vessel that had made that point since the bombardment of November. She had been at the wharf but a few minutes, when a half-dozen shot from the enemy were thrown at her from the guns of Fort Pickens and the batteries on the island. She lost no time in quitting the wharf for the city, where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orderany of them were killed we have no means of ascertaining; but their tents and camp were knocked into the middle of January, certain. After the dispersion of these regiments, the guns of the Louisiana Infantry were principally directed against Fort Pickens and the batteries east of her. The Alabama and Georgia Regiments, about the same time, commenced on the batteries looking to McRae, shooting away their colors and damaging one of the guns of Pickens. Through almost the entire night our g
Fort McRae (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
ng in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantry; by Capts. Baker, Posey, and the entire line of batteries of the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity that of the action of the 22d November. The Yankees were soon dispersed in every direction, some seeking safety in holes, others behind sand hills, while by far the greater number took to their heels, laying in the shade the celebrated race of Billy Wilson, near the same locality. These troops were supposed to be a Massachusetts regiment and some New York volunteers--the latter, however, I will do the cred
Warrington, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 4
ly directed against Fort Pickens and the batteries east of her. The Alabama and Georgia Regiments, about the same time, commenced on the batteries looking to McRae, shooting away their colors and damaging one of the guns of Pickens. Through almost the entire night our guns kept up at regular intervals their fire. The scene was grand beyond conception — the shells, in their screeching and screaming journey, resembling startled meteors coursing the Heavens. About twelve o'clock several buildings in Warrington were fired, the flames lighting up the yard and the village, and forts, and batteries, presenting a scene grand as the bombardment which perpetuates the name of Anderson and the birth-day of the new year. We have suffered no loss of life or limb, nor sustained any injury in guns. Gen. Bragg arrived from his Mobile visit this morning about four o'clock. There is little likelihood of any more firing — no injury can be inflicted on the enemy nor can he harm u
Billy Wilson (search for this): article 4
the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity that of the action of the 22d November. The Yankees were soon dispersed in every direction, some seeking safety in holes, others behind sand hills, while by far the greater number took to their heels, laying in the shade the celebrated race of Billy Wilson, near the same locality. These troops were supposed to be a Massachusetts regiment and some New York volunteers--the latter, however, I will do the credit to say, behaved much better, and towards night, after their fright had subsided, frequently cheered what they considered good shots at our batteries.--Whether any of them were killed we have no means of ascertaining; but their tents and camp were knocked into the middle of January, certain. After the dispersion of these regiments, the
t the wharf but a few minutes, when a half-dozen shot from the enemy were thrown at her from the guns of Fort Pickens and the batteries on the island. She lost no time in quitting the wharf for the city, where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orders from Brigadier General Richard H. Anderson--commanding in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantry; by Capts. Baker, Posey, and the entire line of batteries of the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity
eries on the island. She lost no time in quitting the wharf for the city, where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orders from Brigadier General Richard H. Anderson--commanding in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantry; by Capts. Baker, Posey, and the entire line of batteries of the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity that of the action of the 22d November. The Yankees were soon dispersed in every direction, some seeking safety in holes, oth
Richard H. Anderson (search for this): article 4
n the island. She lost no time in quitting the wharf for the city, where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orders from Brigadier General Richard H. Anderson--commanding in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, meteors coursing the Heavens. About twelve o'clock several buildings in Warrington were fired, the flames lighting up the yard and the village, and forts, and batteries, presenting a scene grand as the bombardment which perpetuates the name of Anderson and the birth-day of the new year. We have suffered no loss of life or limb, nor sustained any injury in guns. Gen. Bragg arrived from his Mobile visit this morning about four o'clock. There is little likelihood of any more firing
where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orders from Brigadier General Richard H. Anderson--commanding in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantry; by Capts. Baker, Posey, and the entire line of batteries of the First Alabama Regiment, including Fort Barrancas; and by the guns of the Thirty-sixth Georgia and Mississippi regiments, reaching beyond and embracing Fort McRae. The fire from these guns was almost deafening, and far excelling in rapidity that of the action of the 22d November. The Yankees were soon dispersed in every direction, some seeking safety in holes, others behind sand hills, while by far the greater number took to their heels
r the city, where she arrived without injury. Capt. West, of the Louisiana Infantry, fired a single shot, and without orders, in return. Half an hour later orders from Brigadier General Richard H. Anderson--commanding in the absence of General Bragg--were dispatched to the various batteries to concentrate their fire on the camps of the troops on the Island. The order was promptly executed by the batteries of Capts. West, Bachelor, Wheat, Taylor, and Lieut. Mader of the Louisiana Infantrldings in Warrington were fired, the flames lighting up the yard and the village, and forts, and batteries, presenting a scene grand as the bombardment which perpetuates the name of Anderson and the birth-day of the new year. We have suffered no loss of life or limb, nor sustained any injury in guns. Gen. Bragg arrived from his Mobile visit this morning about four o'clock. There is little likelihood of any more firing — no injury can be inflicted on the enemy nor can he harm us.
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