hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 32 0 Browse Search
Brownlow 24 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 12 0 Browse Search
T. A. R. Nelson 12 0 Browse Search
Richard H. Anderson 11 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 10 0 Browse Search
Charles W. Brigham 10 0 Browse Search
Pickett 9 9 Browse Search
Beauregard 9 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 24 total hits in 10 results.

Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 6
ter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents — but the morning of their departure, he told the guests at the hotel where he resides, that they certainly would be captured; that it had been
Havana (Cuba) (search for this): article 6
A Confederate Colonel in Havana --He Predicts the Capture of Mason and Slidell.--The New Orleans True Delta publishes a very interesting letter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days befoHavana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
hotel where he resides, that they certainly would be captured; that it had been decided upon between Shufeldt and Capt. Wilkes before the San Jacinto left this port. None believed it; but I was more obdurate than others. Events have justified his knowledge. His rooms, through the day, are thronged with gentlemen seeking information on various affairs connected with the South, and all goes blythe as a marriage bell. I do not know whether he has funds or credits provided by the Confederate States, but he finds money in abundance to pay all his agents for good services. Shufeldt does nothing in uttering lies to Serrano or to his government that Helm is not instantly informed of, and if he dispatches a steamer to intercept his messengers, he provides means for the safety of his documents and defeats their miserable management of corrupt material. His bearer of dispatches may be arrested, but his letters will not be taken. General Serrano is provided with a synopsis of all
South, and all goes blythe as a marriage bell. I do not know whether he has funds or credits provided by the Confederate States, but he finds money in abundance to pay all his agents for good services. Shufeldt does nothing in uttering lies to Serrano or to his government that Helm is not instantly informed of, and if he dispatches a steamer to intercept his messengers, he provides means for the safety of his documents and defeats their miserable management of corrupt material. His bearenot instantly informed of, and if he dispatches a steamer to intercept his messengers, he provides means for the safety of his documents and defeats their miserable management of corrupt material. His bearer of dispatches may be arrested, but his letters will not be taken. General Serrano is provided with a synopsis of all military news from verified data and facts, so that the mischievous bulletins of the Northern press, their wire victories, are deprived of the electric evil intended.
me indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents — but the morning of their departure, he told the guests at the hotel where he resides, that they certainly would be captured; that it had been decided upon between Shufeldt and Capt. Wilkes before the San Jacinto left this port. None believed it; but I was more obdurate than others. Events have justified his knowledge. His rooms, through the day, are thronged with gentlemen seeking information on various affairs connected with the South, and all goes blythe as a marriage bell. I do not know whether he has funds or credits provided by the Confederate States, but he finds money in abundance to pay all his agents for good services. Shufeldt does nothing in uttering li
A Confederate Colonel in Havana --He Predicts the Capture of Mason and Slidell.--The New Orleans True Delta publishes a very interesting letter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agen
A Confederate Colonel in Havana --He Predicts the Capture of Mason and Slidell.--The New Orleans True Delta publishes a very interesting letter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agen
Charles J. Helm (search for this): article 6
e Capture of Mason and Slidell.--The New Orleans True Delta publishes a very interesting letter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, hmarriage bell. I do not know whether he has funds or credits provided by the Confederate States, but he finds money in abundance to pay all his agents for good services. Shufeldt does nothing in uttering lies to Serrano or to his government that Helm is not instantly informed of, and if he dispatches a steamer to intercept his messengers, he provides means for the safety of his documents and defeats their miserable management of corrupt material. His bearer of dispatches may be arrested,
ason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents — but the morning of their departure, he told the guests at the hotel where he resides, that they certainly would be captured; that it had been decided upon between Shufeldt and Capt. Wilkes before the San Jacinto left this port. None believed it; but I was more obdurate than others. Events have justified his knowledge. His rooms, through the day, are thronged with gentlemen seeking information on various affairs connected with the South, and all goes blythe as a marriage bell. I do not know whether he has funds or credits provided by the Confederate States, but he finds money in abundance to pay all his agents for good services. Shufeldt does nothing in uttering lies to Serrano or to his government that Helm is not instantly informed of, and if he dispatches a steamer to intercept his messengers, he provides means for the safety of his documents and defeats their miserable management of corrupt
December 26th (search for this): article 6
A Confederate Colonel in Havana --He Predicts the Capture of Mason and Slidell.--The New Orleans True Delta publishes a very interesting letter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents