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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Missouri (United States) (search for this): article 7
this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General Price to gain access to the great Missouri valley, which would afford not only the opportunity to General Price, of adding large accessions to his army, but would give the South access to the exhaustless supplies of that country.
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 7
Interesting from Missouri. --Sentiment of the People — The Federal Forces.--From the Little Rock (Ark) Journal, of the 7th inst., we copy the following: Judge Clark and Judge Spratt, of North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Swest Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General
Missouri Valley (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): article 7
his city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General Price to gain access to the great Missouri valley, which would afford not only the opportunity to General Price, of adding large accessions to his army, but would give the South access to the exhaustless supplies of that country.
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 7
Interesting from Missouri. --Sentiment of the People — The Federal Forces.--From the Little Rock (Ark) Journal, of the 7th inst., we copy the following: Judge Clark and Judge Spratt, of North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General P
Interesting from Missouri. --Sentiment of the People — The Federal Forces.--From the Little Rock (Ark) Journal, of the 7th inst., we copy the following: Judge Clark and Judge Spratt, of North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General P
f North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, wen that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force 00 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General Price to gain access to the great Missouri valley, which would afford not only the opportunity to General Price, of adding o enable General Price to gain access to the great Missouri valley, which would afford not only the opportunity to General Price, of adding large accessions to his army, but would give the South access to the exhaustless supplies of that country.
Interesting from Missouri. --Sentiment of the People — The Federal Forces.--From the Little Rock (Ark) Journal, of the 7th inst., we copy the following: Judge Clark and Judge Spratt, of North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General Pr
Interesting from Missouri. --Sentiment of the People — The Federal Forces.--From the Little Rock (Ark) Journal, of the 7th inst., we copy the following: Judge Clark and Judge Spratt, of North west Missouri, arrived in this city yesterday, having made their way through the Federal lines to the army of General Price at Springfields. Those distinguished gentlemen, having in the enemy's country a vowed strong Southern sentiments, were reduced to the necessity of leaving their homes to unite their destiny with the cause of Southern independence. They express the opinion that the popular voice of Missouri, if untrammeled, would ive one hundred thousand majority for the South, and that if Price's army can obtain access to the Missouri river, our complete triumph in that State is inevitable. The Federal force there is thought to be between 60,000 and 80,000, and our Government will most assuredly add reinforcements to the army of Missouri sufficient to enable General P