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Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 13
— killed and wounded. I have not been able to get their names. Late and interesting from Kentucky--the enemy reported five thousand strong on this side of Green River. From an interesting letter in the Nashville Union and American, under date of Bowling Green, Jan. 10, we extract the following: It is pretty well settled that the enemy, in what exact force it is impossible to state, is this side of Green River, having crossed at the recently repaired bridge near Munfordsville. An officer in Colonel Hanson's second Kentucky regiment came down from our advance yesterday. He states that while on a scouting expedition toward Green, River he and vance forces, it would seem, also go to show that a forward movement of the enemy is looked for. Hindman, with his men, forming as they did our advance force on Green River, has fallen back to near Oakland Station and is now only a short distance ahead of Breckinridge's Kentucky Brigade, and about sixteen miles above this place. T
Morristown (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 13
ave determined men, are coming forward to the rescue of the State. The fact that Hon. W. C. Preston, now General Preston, is to lead the newly raised Kentucky troops authorized by the Provisional Government, is working with the potency of a charm. They are responding to the call, and before long so great will be the accessions, that the General will be able to take the field in active service. Arrival of bridge burners. Lieut. W. F. Parker, Company H, 29th Regiment, (says the Asheville, N. C., News,) got on the trail of a couple of Tennessee bridge burners last week, and with a squad of his men followed them into this State, and arrested them some 12 or 15 miles north of this place, at 1 o'clock in the morning. A Contemptible act. We learn from the Lynchburg Republican. of the 20th inst., that during Friday night the Confederate flag which has been flying from the yard of John C. L. Goggin, Esq., of that city, was forcibly torn down by some traitorous scoundrel, th
Bowling Green, Wood County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 13
ll, leg amputated; Wm. B. Roberts, slightly in foot. Capt. Hale's Company.--Wounded — Jesse Reese, in both thighs. Capt. Horne's Company — Benj. Huddle, slightly in hip. Total--5 killed; 7 wounded. Col. Williams lost — killed and wounded. I have not been able to get their names. Late and interesting from Kentucky--the enemy reported five thousand strong on this side of Green River. From an interesting letter in the Nashville Union and American, under date of Bowling Green, Jan. 10, we extract the following: It is pretty well settled that the enemy, in what exact force it is impossible to state, is this side of Green River, having crossed at the recently repaired bridge near Munfordsville. An officer in Colonel Hanson's second Kentucky regiment came down from our advance yesterday. He states that while on a scouting expedition toward Green, River he and his friends distinctly saw the Federal tents. They counted four hundred tents and estimate thei<
Woodsonville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 13
stantiate the report that they are this side in considerable force, and that more are preparing to follow. On the 7th inst., the embankments thrown across the deep ravine for the Louisville and Nashville Turnpike road, were blown up near Woodsonville. This was done by orders, and certainly for the purpose of rendering the turnpike impassable to the enemy's heavy ordnance and baggage wagons. This was done near where the road enters the Green Brier Ford, passing from Woodsonville to MunforWoodsonville to Munfordsville, and in the vicinity of the place where the engagement was had with Col. Terry and his valiant Rangers.--The obstruction of this road and the destruction of a part of the railroad, and the blowing in of the short tunnel above, of which previous letters gave you an account, indicate that an advance of the foe is expected and that our Generals wish to put as many impediments in their way as possible. The positions of our advance forces, it would seem, also go to show that a forward moveme
Prestonburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 13
ear Prestonsburg — account from a participant. The following letter, giving a partial account of the battle near Prestonsburg, Ky., was written for the Abingdon Democrat, by the junior editor of that paper, who was a participant in the fight; buten we were again ordered into line of march, the alarm turning out to be false. We then proceeded to the west fork of Middle Creek, where we remained in camp during the next day, Thursday. Together with several others, your correspondent spent on by the Yankee pickets. The battle. When we reached the command we found the forces forming in the forks of Middle Creek, to give the enemy a reception, who were advancing in strong force. Captain Jeffrey's artillery were placed in batterer than ours; but what was its extent we have not been able to learn. List of killed and wounded at the battle of Middle Creek: Captain Bryant's Company, 29th Virginia Regiment--Killed--Privates, Oscar Pickett, Leftwich Patton, John Pickett
Paintsville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 13
tten for the Abingdon Democrat, by the junior editor of that paper, who was a participant in the fight; but the Democrat being temporarily suspended, it was kindly furnished the editor of the Lynchburg Republican, in which paper it appeared on Monday, the 20th inst.: Camp on beaver Creek, January 13, 1862. For the last week we have been in the midst of stirring events. Last Sunday night our Colonel was notified by General Marshall that "the enemy are reported to be entering Paintsville — put your regiment under arms quietly."We were not attacked there, however, and, on Monday morning at two o'clock, orders were sent to cook all the provision we had, and prepare to fall back. We did so, but our regiment was unable to leave camp until half- past 3 o'clock, P. M., and only made some six miles; but such was the execrable condition of the roads, that all the trains did not get over until Tuesday night. We rested, therefore, during that day. Next morning we were aroused at 2
John Williams (search for this): article 13
12 M. After marching a little over a mile, we were ordered to take to cover, as the enemy was in view. Accordingly; the 54th and 29th Virginia Volunteers, and Col. Williams's Kentucky Regiment, formed with alacrity on a hillside, under cover of a fence, while the cavalry galloped to the front. We had scarcely formed, however, whes, supported by Colonel Trigg's 54th Virginia regiment. Colonel Moore's 29th Virginia regiment was thrown upon a hill east of the east fork of the creek, and Colonel Williams's Kentucky regiment occupied a higher hill, to the right of Moore's regiment. After waiting patiently for an hour, the enemy were seen advancing up the Capt. Hale's Company.--Wounded — Jesse Reese, in both thighs. Capt. Horne's Company — Benj. Huddle, slightly in hip. Total--5 killed; 7 wounded. Col. Williams lost — killed and wounded. I have not been able to get their names. Late and interesting from Kentucky--the enemy reported five thousand strong on this s<
Leftwich Patton (search for this): article 13
earn their laurels upon some other field. They will do so as soon as an opportunity offers, for they are fully prepared to maintain the honor of Old Virginia. So far as we have been able to learn, the enemy made an attempt to follow us. Their loss was greatly larger than ours; but what was its extent we have not been able to learn. List of killed and wounded at the battle of Middle Creek: Captain Bryant's Company, 29th Virginia Regiment--Killed--Privates, Oscar Pickett, Leftwich Patton, John Pickett, Wm. Bowers. Wounded. Privates Joshua G. Montgomery, seriously; John Graham, through both thighs; Ivey Milton, slightly. Capt. Jesse's Company.--Killed--Private Stanford Jessee. Wounded — Geo. McReynolds, of Russell, leg amputated; Wm. B. Roberts, slightly in foot. Capt. Hale's Company.--Wounded — Jesse Reese, in both thighs. Capt. Horne's Company — Benj. Huddle, slightly in hip. Total--5 killed; 7 wounded. Col. Williams lost — killed and wounde
straint. But as the enemy were repulsed without their assistance, they will have to earn their laurels upon some other field. They will do so as soon as an opportunity offers, for they are fully prepared to maintain the honor of Old Virginia. So far as we have been able to learn, the enemy made an attempt to follow us. Their loss was greatly larger than ours; but what was its extent we have not been able to learn. List of killed and wounded at the battle of Middle Creek: Captain Bryant's Company, 29th Virginia Regiment--Killed--Privates, Oscar Pickett, Leftwich Patton, John Pickett, Wm. Bowers. Wounded. Privates Joshua G. Montgomery, seriously; John Graham, through both thighs; Ivey Milton, slightly. Capt. Jesse's Company.--Killed--Private Stanford Jessee. Wounded — Geo. McReynolds, of Russell, leg amputated; Wm. B. Roberts, slightly in foot. Capt. Hale's Company.--Wounded — Jesse Reese, in both thighs. Capt. Horne's Company — Benj. Huddle, slightly in<
George Spradlin (search for this): article 13
ch, the alarm turning out to be false. We then proceeded to the west fork of Middle Creek, where we remained in camp during the next day, Thursday. Together with several others, your correspondent spent Thursday night at the house of Mr. George Spradlin, a short distance from the camp, and while at breakfast, on Friday morning, Mr. Spradlin came in and said, "Gentlemen, there are about forty men on the hill out here, and they ordered me to halt." The entire party then jumped up from the tMr. Spradlin came in and said, "Gentlemen, there are about forty men on the hill out here, and they ordered me to halt." The entire party then jumped up from the table, without the least ceremony, and made their way back to the camp, in safety, not with standing they were all fired upon by the Yankee pickets. The battle. When we reached the command we found the forces forming in the forks of Middle Creek, to give the enemy a reception, who were advancing in strong force. Captain Jeffrey's artillery were placed in battery in the woods, supported by Colonel Trigg's 54th Virginia regiment. Colonel Moore's 29th Virginia regiment was thrown upon a hi
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