hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cash 42 0 Browse Search
W. B. Crittenden 26 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas B. Lincoln 14 0 Browse Search
Felix K. Zollicoffer 13 1 Browse Search
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
A. M. Barbour 9 1 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 27, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 64 total hits in 19 results.

1 2
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 14
husetts would bring about such a state of things as now exist. He did not think the South guilty of such mad folly. After he wrote the letter employees of the Government sent documents to Davis and Benjamin, &c. He went himself that summer forty miles into Virginia, not dreaming there would be a gun fired, and he believed it only when the sad reality came. He had his own political opinions after twenty-seven years political services, and would not give them up for threats of expulsion, Fort Warren, or the halter. No man should charge him with want of fealty to the flag of his country. He did not anticipate war, because he believed in a President whom he was sorry he helped to elevate to his position, and who was false to his trust. Mr. Fessenden, (rep) of Me., asked if the Senator did not suppose there would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had said repeatedly that he had no recollection of
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 14
eet — the Louisville Democrat with recruting for the rebel army in Kentucky, and that he had written the letter read to-day. He paid no attention to these until old friends wrote him. He then wrote the other letter, which was more offensive here than the former. If he was guilty of treason it was for writing the letter to Jeff. Davis, introducing Thomas B. Lincoln. Mr. Lincoln was born in Philadelphia and reared there, and came West to live. He did the largest business of any man in Indiana, as a wholesale merchant, and established a character for truth and probity; he then went to Texas and engaged in the raising of cattle; he came here afterwards to forward the project of the Pacific Railroad. He (Mr. Bright) had no recollection of this letter, but he must have written it. He had also given Lincoln a letter to Capt. Franklin, and would read both to show that they were similar in language. When he addressed the letter to Davis by his title he was only following the example
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 14
sending improved fire-arms was aid and comfort to the enemy. But he(Mr. Lane) considered the second letter of Mr. Bright to Mr. Fitch much worse than the first. He (Mr. Lane) had nothing to say against abolitionism; for it the Senator from Massachusetts [Mr. Sumner] let that pass, he (Mr. Lane) had nothing to add. But in that letter to Mr. Fitch his colleague said he was entirely opposed to the coercive policy of the Government. He (Mr. Lane) was in favor of all the coercive policy of the Gdid the firearms. If any one had asked him for such a letter after the proclamation of the President he would have answered "No." He did not believe there would be war. He did not believe that mad fanatics, under the lead of the Senator from Massachusetts would bring about such a state of things as now exist. He did not think the South guilty of such mad folly. After he wrote the letter employees of the Government sent documents to Davis and Benjamin, &c. He went himself that summer forty mi
United States (United States) (search for this): article 14
ebellion, the taking of the forts, the seizure of the national property, and to the time when Jeff Davis became the head of the rebellion and war was actually commenced against the Government. At this time Jesse II Bright, Senator of the United States, writes a letter to the chief of traitors (the letter was read). Mr. Bright has always been notoriously the friend and sympathizer of Davis and Slidell in their schemes in favor of slavery, and always voted with them. He (Mr. Sumner) commented on the address of the letter which was to "His Excellency, Jefferson Lavis, President of the Confederate States," and claimed that it was as far as possible the recognition of a pretender as President of the rebel States. It was a letter of friendship and sympathy all the way through, and showed that there was one person who, forgetting what was due to the country and due to the rebellion, stretched forth his hand in friendly salutation. An American Senator sends his friend to the rebels wi
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 14
ing there would be a gun fired, and he believed it only when the sad reality came. He had his own political opinions after twenty-seven years political services, and would not give them up for threats of expulsion, Fort Warren, or the halter. No man should charge him with want of fealty to the flag of his country. He did not anticipate war, because he believed in a President whom he was sorry he helped to elevate to his position, and who was false to his trust. Mr. Fessenden, (rep) of Me., asked if the Senator did not suppose there would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had said repeatedly that he had no recollection of giving the letter to Mr. Lincoln. He had before given Mr.Lincoln a letter to Mr. Floyd, and if he had been in collusion with the South he would not have sent the improvement in arms to this government; but he had no doubt that Floyd threw the matter overboard, and Lincoln bore
nd can be stated briefly --He (Mr. Sumner) then briefly referred to the leading events in the rebellion, the taking of the forts, the seizure of the national property, and to the time when Jeff Davis became the head of the rebellion and war was actually commenced against the Government. At this time Jesse II Bright, Senator of the United States, writes a letter to the chief of traitors (the letter was read). Mr. Bright has always been notoriously the friend and sympathizer of Davis and Slidell in their schemes in favor of slavery, and always voted with them. He (Mr. Sumner) commented on the address of the letter which was to "His Excellency, Jefferson Lavis, President of the Confederate States," and claimed that it was as far as possible the recognition of a pretender as President of the rebel States. It was a letter of friendship and sympathy all the way through, and showed that there was one person who, forgetting what was due to the country and due to the rebellion, stretche
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 14
r. Bright has always been notoriously the friend and sympathizer of Davis and Slidell in their schemes in favor of slavery, and always voted at time. Before the 1st of March the rebellion was inaugurated and Davis elected at its head. All the waters of another deluge cannot wash ich we to day are resisting. It there was to be no war, why should Davis want improved dre-arms? He (Mr. Lane) believed that the letter uner. If he was guilty of treason it was for writing the letter to Jeff. Davis, introducing Thomas B. Lincoln. Mr. Lincoln was born in Phihat they were similar in language. When he addressed the letter to Davis by his title he was only following the example of Senators in this r he wrote the letter employees of the Government sent documents to Davis and Benjamin, &c. He went himself that summer forty miles into Virgose there would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had sai
, no authority, no extenuation, can remove unmitigated crime. Mr. Lane, (rep.,) of lnd, said that he should say nothing on this subject bre was to be no war, why should Davis want improved dre-arms? He (Mr. Lane) believed that the letter unexplained was sufficient evidence of tnding improved fire-arms was aid and comfort to the enemy. But he(Mr. Lane) considered the second letter of Mr. Bright to Mr. Fitch much worse than the first. He (Mr. Lane) had nothing to say against abolitionism; for it the Senator from Massachusetts [Mr. Sumner] let that pass, he (Mr. Lane) had nothing to add. But in that letter to Mr. Fitch his colleague said he was entirely opposed to the coercive policy of the Government. He (Mr. Lane) was in favor of all the coercive policy of the Government, and would tax every dollar to carry on the war. He (Mr. Lane)Mr. Lane) would carry on the war until every individual was bankrupt. He would give his coat off his back, and even die in a pauper's grave, and be bu
ere would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had said repeatedly that he had no recollection of giving the letter to Mr. Lincoln. He had before given Mr.Lincoln a letter to Mr. Floyd, and if he had been in collusion with the South he would not have sent the improvement in arms to this government; but he had no doubt that Floyd threw the matter overboard, and Lincoln bored him for another letter and he gave it. ere would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had said repeatedly that he had no recollection of giving the letter to Mr. Lincoln. He had before given Mr.Lincoln a letter to Mr. Floyd, and if he had been in collusion with the South he would not have sent the improvement in arms to this government; but he had no doubt that Floyd threw the matter overboard, and Lincoln bored him for another letter and he gave it.
Virginia, not dreaming there would be a gun fired, and he believed it only when the sad reality came. He had his own political opinions after twenty-seven years political services, and would not give them up for threats of expulsion, Fort Warren, or the halter. No man should charge him with want of fealty to the flag of his country. He did not anticipate war, because he believed in a President whom he was sorry he helped to elevate to his position, and who was false to his trust. Mr. Fessenden, (rep) of Me., asked if the Senator did not suppose there would be any war, what occasion was there to suppose that Davis wanted an improvement in fire-arms? Mr. Bright said he had said repeatedly that he had no recollection of giving the letter to Mr. Lincoln. He had before given Mr.Lincoln a letter to Mr. Floyd, and if he had been in collusion with the South he would not have sent the improvement in arms to this government; but he had no doubt that Floyd threw the matter overboar
1 2