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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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France (France) (search for this): article 1
neral Floyd and Buckner in reviewing troops. The display was imposing, and the General in command was well pleased with the thorough training and preparation for marching of the various brigades. The Second Kentucky was the observed of all observers. Composed chiefly of the old Kentucky State Guard, and commanded by Col. Hanson, a most capital officer and brave man, the regiment evinced a proficiency in drill and a soldierly bearing which would reflect credit upon the veteran regiments of France. Gen. Floyd was evidently greatly gratified by their appearance as they passed in review. Colonel Hanson will make a figure with his regiment wherever he engages the enemy. Mark that! When we will leave this place, is unknown to me. I get no Dispatch, and hear nothing from Virginia except through the Nashville papers. The election of Mr. Hunter to the Senate gives great satisfaction, as does also that of Mr. Preston. Since the death of Mr. Tyler, the impression is universal that Ho
Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Russellville, Ky., Jan. 27, 1862. Russellville, situated in "a low, green valley," twenty-eight miles from Bowling Green, and two hundred and thirty miles from Memphis, by railway, is a town containing three thousand inhabitants, and noted as the place where the Provisional Goverle space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the people are cool in their treatment of Southern soldiers, or at best, only tolerably polite and attentive. The truth is, that before Gen. Johnston's army went to Bowling Green the bulk of the inhabitants sympathized with the Union cause of Lincoln. A powerful reaction has taken place within the last two months, and those who still cling to the "flesh pots of Egypt" are as mute as particular mice. The ladies, God bless them, are outspoken for the South. Here, our f
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Kentucky. Floyd and Buckner — the Unionists in Bowling Green--plenty of everything — Congressional election — Reviews, &c. [special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Russellville, Ky., Jan. 27, 1862. Russellville, situated in "a low, green valley," twenty-eight miles from Bowling Green, and two hundred and thirty miles from Memphis, by railway, is a town containing three thousand inhabitants, and noted as the place where the Provisional Government was put on its legs. For the present, it is the headquarters of Generals Lloyd and Buckner. There is a large army here, the tents being pitched for miles along the railroad, which touches the western part of the town. As in other localities where troops have been massed, there is a perfect squeeze here, all the available space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the pe<
Russellville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Kentucky. Floyd and Buckner — the Unionists in Bowling Green--plenty of everything — Congressional election — Reviews, &c. [special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Russellville, Ky., Jan. 27, 1862. Russellville, situated in "a low, green valley," twenty-eight miles from Bowling Green, and two hundred and thirty miles from Memphis, by railway, is a town containing three thousand inhabitants, and noted as the place where the Provisional Government was put on its legs. . As in other localities where troops have been massed, there is a perfect squeeze here, all the available space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the people are cool in their treatment of Southern soldiers, or at best, only tolerably polite and attentive. The truth is, that before Gen. Johnston's army went to Bowling Green the bulk of the inhabita<
been massed, there is a perfect squeeze here, all the available space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the people are cool in their treatment of Southern soldiers, or at best, only tolerably polite and attentive. The truth is, that before Gen. Johnston's army went to Bowling Green the bulk of the inhabitants sympathized with the Union cause of Lincoln. A powerful reaction has taken place within the last two months, and those who still cling to the "flesh pots of Egypt" are as mute as particular mice. The ladies, God bless them, are outspoken for the South. Here, our friends are not few or far between. They speak out and act out manfully. Hence there is a feeling among the soldiers that they are in the midst of the best and the bravest of Kentuckians. There are plenty of the very finest artillery here that are in the service — p
he General in command was well pleased with the thorough training and preparation for marching of the various brigades. The Second Kentucky was the observed of all observers. Composed chiefly of the old Kentucky State Guard, and commanded by Col. Hanson, a most capital officer and brave man, the regiment evinced a proficiency in drill and a soldierly bearing which would reflect credit upon the veteran regiments of France. Gen. Floyd was evidently greatly gratified by their appearance as they passed in review. Colonel Hanson will make a figure with his regiment wherever he engages the enemy. Mark that! When we will leave this place, is unknown to me. I get no Dispatch, and hear nothing from Virginia except through the Nashville papers. The election of Mr. Hunter to the Senate gives great satisfaction, as does also that of Mr. Preston. Since the death of Mr. Tyler, the impression is universal that Hon. Thos. S. Bocock will be elected Speaker of the House without serious oppo
From Kentucky. Floyd and Buckner — the Unionists in Bowling Green--plenty of everything — Congressional election — Reviews, &c. [special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Russellville, Ky., Jan. 27, 1862. Russellville, situated in "a low, green valley," twenty-eight miles from Bowling Green, and two hundred an. The delegation is regarded as an able one, and it will faithfully reflect the will of the State rights people of "Old Kentucky." Yesterday was spent by General Floyd and Buckner in reviewing troops. The display was imposing, and the General in command was well pleased with the thorough training and preparation for marchingtal officer and brave man, the regiment evinced a proficiency in drill and a soldierly bearing which would reflect credit upon the veteran regiments of France. Gen. Floyd was evidently greatly gratified by their appearance as they passed in review. Colonel Hanson will make a figure with his regiment wherever he engages the enemy<
doubt, unequalled by any in the Southern army. I give you the result of the election for members of Congress, as far is now known. Capt. Robert J. Breckinridge, son of the Presbyterian minister who thinks that women and children ought to be butchered if necessary to crush the rebellion, is elected in the Ashland District. He is a gallant gentleman, and will take a high stand in Congress. The two Bruces are elected in the seventh and ninth districts. Boyd is elected in the first and Crockett in the second. In the third, it is doubtful between Hawes and Read. In the fourth, Ewing is elected by a large majority, and Burnett gets the return in the fifth, by an overwhelming vote. The delegation is regarded as an able one, and it will faithfully reflect the will of the State rights people of "Old Kentucky." Yesterday was spent by General Floyd and Buckner in reviewing troops. The display was imposing, and the General in command was well pleased with the thorough training an
ionists in Bowling Green--plenty of everything — Congressional election — Reviews, &c. [special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Russellville, Ky., Jan. 27, 1862. Russellville, situated in "a low, green valley," twenty-eight miles from Bowling Green, and two hundred and thirty miles from Memphis, by railway, is a town containing three thousand inhabitants, and noted as the place where the Provisional Government was put on its legs. For the present, it is the headquarters of Generals Lloyd and Buckner. There is a large army here, the tents being pitched for miles along the railroad, which touches the western part of the town. As in other localities where troops have been massed, there is a perfect squeeze here, all the available space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the people are cool in their treatment of Southern soldier
ong the railroad, which touches the western part of the town. As in other localities where troops have been massed, there is a perfect squeeze here, all the available space in the hotels and private houses being fully appropriated. But notwithstanding the absence of comfort, one feels more at home in Russellville than in Bowling Green. In the latter, the people are cool in their treatment of Southern soldiers, or at best, only tolerably polite and attentive. The truth is, that before Gen. Johnston's army went to Bowling Green the bulk of the inhabitants sympathized with the Union cause of Lincoln. A powerful reaction has taken place within the last two months, and those who still cling to the "flesh pots of Egypt" are as mute as particular mice. The ladies, God bless them, are outspoken for the South. Here, our friends are not few or far between. They speak out and act out manfully. Hence there is a feeling among the soldiers that they are in the midst of the best and the bra
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