hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 54 0 Browse Search
Seward 36 32 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Adams 16 16 Browse Search
Floyd 15 3 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
France (France) 12 0 Browse Search
Richard L. Bohannon 12 0 Browse Search
M. De Bebian 12 0 Browse Search
Wilkes 11 11 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 74 total hits in 31 results.

1 2 3 4
ion is now counted sure by electoral votes over the required two-thirds. In addition to the above facts a telegraphic dispatch was received by Senator Harris, from the Legislature of New York, instructing him to vote to expel Mr. Bright. Senator Cowan received another that the Senator of Pennsylvania had adopted a joint resolution instructing him also to vote for Bright's expulsion. It is said that the House of Representatives of his State will concur with the Senate in the resolution of instruction to Senator Cowan. Capture of Confederate boats. Yesterday, a couple of boats which had been used for conveying information and supplies to the rebels, were captured near Accotink. Information had been received by General Heintzelman, that for some time past communication had been kept up between parties living in the woods near Mr. Vernon and the southwest shore of Mason's Neck, and that the boats employed for that purpose were secreted somewhere in the vicinity. One
ay on the resolution for the expulsion of Senator Bright for disloyalty, reached the turning point against the Indiana Senator. The splendid and powerful speech of Senator Johnston, Tennessee, settled the question. Before — speech was made, Senator Foster, of Connecticut, expressed himself against the redemption, but at the conclusion of Mr. Johnson, speech Senator Foster announced that he would vote for the expulsion. This announcement settled the question against thereupon other Senators wSenator Foster announced that he would vote for the expulsion. This announcement settled the question against thereupon other Senators who would otherwise have voted in favor of his retaining his seat, changed their minds, so that his expulsion is now counted sure by electoral votes over the required two-thirds. In addition to the above facts a telegraphic dispatch was received by Senator Harris, from the Legislature of New York, instructing him to vote to expel Mr. Bright. Senator Cowan received another that the Senator of Pennsylvania had adopted a joint resolution instructing him also to vote for Bright's expulsion. It
T. C. Johnson (search for this): article 22
evident that General McClellan already has them in his grasp,. Let us watch and wait. The case of Senator Bright. The debate in the Senate to day on the resolution for the expulsion of Senator Bright for disloyalty, reached the turning point against the Indiana Senator. The splendid and powerful speech of Senator Johnston, Tennessee, settled the question. Before — speech was made, Senator Foster, of Connecticut, expressed himself against the redemption, but at the conclusion of Mr. Johnson, speech Senator Foster announced that he would vote for the expulsion. This announcement settled the question against thereupon other Senators who would otherwise have voted in favor of his retaining his seat, changed their minds, so that his expulsion is now counted sure by electoral votes over the required two-thirds. In addition to the above facts a telegraphic dispatch was received by Senator Harris, from the Legislature of New York, instructing him to vote to expel Mr. Bright.
and supplies to the rebels, were captured near Accotink. Information had been received by General Heintzelman, that for some time past communication had been kept up between parties living in the woods near Mr. Vernon and the southwest shore of Mason's Neck, and that the boats employed for that purpose were secreted somewhere in the vicinity. One of the boats was the same in which a party of rebels had, in October last, crossed over and burned the boats belonging to people living in Accotink, which is a Union village. During the afternoon a fish house on Mason's Neck, which has served as a depot for the articles smuggled over for the rebels, was observed to be in flames. From the Lower Potomac. The New York Herald has the following note of affairs on the Lower Potomac: The steamer Hecla, a Philadelphia, boat, which on her last trip up with stores, &c., about a week ago, had ninety-five shots fired at her from the rebel batteries, all of which missed her, ran th
ill have made a connection across North Carolina. As the rebels understand the game, they will doubtless go to work with some energy; but the odds are against them; for it is evident that General McClellan already has them in his grasp,. Let us watch and wait. The case of Senator Bright. The debate in the Senate to day on the resolution for the expulsion of Senator Bright for disloyalty, reached the turning point against the Indiana Senator. The splendid and powerful speech of Senator Johnston, Tennessee, settled the question. Before — speech was made, Senator Foster, of Connecticut, expressed himself against the redemption, but at the conclusion of Mr. Johnson, speech Senator Foster announced that he would vote for the expulsion. This announcement settled the question against thereupon other Senators who would otherwise have voted in favor of his retaining his seat, changed their minds, so that his expulsion is now counted sure by electoral votes over the required two-thi
00,000 --$275,000,000--are deposited in five joint stock banks in England, at 1½ per cent. Some English writers state that a portion of this money would undoubtedly be invested in American securities but for the general impression that we are a nation of swindlers, and do not intend to pay our debts. The securities of Brazil and Turkey appear to command a higher position in British esteem, and are rising in the market. The last quotations were as follows: United States 6's, coupon, 1881, 89 a 89¼; do, 5's, coupon, 1874, 78 a 79¼; Indiana 5's,--a 7, Virginia 6's, 51; Tennessee 6's, 44¼ a 44¼; North Carolina 6's, 62 a 62¼; Missouri 5's, 41a 41¼; Pacific Mail, 98¾ a 99. Tax on gas. One of the first subjects of taxation will, no doubt, be the illuminating gas which now enters so largely into the consumption of every village, town, and city in the land statistics have been obtained from all part of the country, going to show the enormous aggregate business done in this
January, 2 AD (search for this): article 22
War news. From Northern papers, of the 1st February, we collect the following: Federal Financial matters. New York, Jan. 31. --In some quarters there was rather more demand for money to-day, and many of the brokers are paying six per cent. Others, however, obtain all the money they need at five. First class paper rules, as yesterday, at 6 a 7. Letters by the Africa state that no less than $55,000,000 --$275,000,000--are deposited in five joint stock banks in England, at 1½ per cent. Some English writers state that a portion of this money would undoubtedly be invested in American securities but for the general impression that we are a nation of swindlers, and do not intend to pay our debts. The securities of Brazil and Turkey appear to command a higher position in British esteem, and are rising in the market. The last quotations were as follows: United States 6's, coupon, 1881, 89 a 89¼; do, 5's, coupon, 1874, 78 a 79¼; Indiana 5's,--a 7, Virginia 6's, 51;
January 31st (search for this): article 22
War news. From Northern papers, of the 1st February, we collect the following: Federal Financial matters. New York, Jan. 31. --In some quarters there was rather more demand for money to-day, and many of the brokers are paying six per cent. Others, however, obtain all the money they need at five. First class paper rules, as yesterday, at 6 a 7. Letters by the Africa state that no less than $55,000,000 --$275,000,000--are deposited in five joint stock banks in England, at 1½ per cent. Some English writers state that a portion of this money would undoubtedly be invested in American securities but for the general impression that we are a nation of swindlers, and do not intend to pay our debts. The securities of Brazil and Turkey appear to command a higher position in British esteem, and are rising in the market. The last quotations were as follows: United States 6's, coupon, 1881, 89 a 89¼; do, 5's, coupon, 1874, 78 a 79¼; Indiana 5's,--a 7, Virginia 6's, 51;
ted in five joint stock banks in England, at 1½ per cent. Some English writers state that a portion of this money would undoubtedly be invested in American securities but for the general impression that we are a nation of swindlers, and do not intend to pay our debts. The securities of Brazil and Turkey appear to command a higher position in British esteem, and are rising in the market. The last quotations were as follows: United States 6's, coupon, 1881, 89 a 89¼; do, 5's, coupon, 1874, 78 a 79¼; Indiana 5's,--a 7, Virginia 6's, 51; Tennessee 6's, 44¼ a 44¼; North Carolina 6's, 62 a 62¼; Missouri 5's, 41a 41¼; Pacific Mail, 98¾ a 99. Tax on gas. One of the first subjects of taxation will, no doubt, be the illuminating gas which now enters so largely into the consumption of every village, town, and city in the land statistics have been obtained from all part of the country, going to show the enormous aggregate business done in this single article. A very slight ex
ave been obtained from all part of the country, going to show the enormous aggregate business done in this single article. A very slight excise duty on each thousand feet manufactured will yield a handsome revenue, which, by a slight economy, will not be felt by domestic consumers. "Gas need no longer be made light of." The Richmond Railroad Convention — the inside track, &c. The Herald, of New York, surmises that the proposed Railroad Convention, to be held in this city on the 5th February, (to-day,) will have for its main object the completion of an unfinished gap of some forty miles, more or less, of an inside line of railroads between Richmond and the South, running down through the western part of North Carolina, and at a pretty safe distance from the army of Buell, in East Tennessee, and of Burnside, in Eastern North Carolina. Jeff. Davis, in his last message to Congress, referred to the importance of finishing the work required to open this inside track. But the
1 2 3 4