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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 18 total hits in 5 results.

Kingston, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Foreign Geography of the United States. --The following delicious jumble appears as a leader in the Jamaica Watchman, published at Kingston, West India: "The news from the United States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle was fought, in which two thousand one hundred Federal soldiers were engaged, and how many rebels we know not. But, as has been the case more than once, the Federals got the worst of it. All the accounts we have seen age so confused as to numbers, dates and places, that we know not how to rely on them, or re-produce them for our readers. When the steamer from New York shall arrive with our regular files of papers, we shall be able to give a more reliable statement.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
Foreign Geography of the United States. --The following delicious jumble appears as a leader in the Jamaica Watchman, published at Kingston, West India: "The news from the United States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle wUnited States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle was fought, in which two thousand one hundred Federal soldiers were engaged, and how many rebels we know not. But, as has been the case more than once, the Federals got the worst of it. All the accounts we have seen age so confused as to numbers, dates and places, that we know not how to rely on them, or re-produce them for our readers. When the steamer from New York shall arrive with our regular files of papers, we shall be able to give a more reliable statement
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 7
Foreign Geography of the United States. --The following delicious jumble appears as a leader in the Jamaica Watchman, published at Kingston, West India: "The news from the United States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle was fought, in which two thousand one hundred Federal soldiers were engaged, and how many rebels we know not. But, as has been the case more than once, the Federals got the worst of it. All the accounts we have seen age so confused as to numbers, dates and places, that we know not how to rely on them, or re-produce them for our readers. When the steamer from New York shall arrive with our regular files of papers, we shall be able to give a more reliable statement.
New England (United States) (search for this): article 7
Foreign Geography of the United States. --The following delicious jumble appears as a leader in the Jamaica Watchman, published at Kingston, West India: "The news from the United States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle was fought, in which two thousand one hundred Federal soldiers were engaged, and how many rebels we know not. But, as has been the case more than once, the Federals got the worst of it. All the accounts we have seen age so confused as to numbers, dates and places, that we know not how to rely on them, or re-produce them for our readers. When the steamer from New York shall arrive with our regular files of papers, we shall be able to give a more reliable statement.
West Indies (search for this): article 7
Foreign Geography of the United States. --The following delicious jumble appears as a leader in the Jamaica Watchman, published at Kingston, West India: "The news from the United States is not very cheering. A battle seems to have been fought at a place called Ban's Bluff. One of our contemporaries says that place is in Rhode I land. but as Rhode Island is three hundred miles from the seat of war, in New England, we suspect there is some mistake about it — At all events, a battle was fought, in which two thousand one hundred Federal soldiers were engaged, and how many rebels we know not. But, as has been the case more than once, the Federals got the worst of it. All the accounts we have seen age so confused as to numbers, dates and places, that we know not how to rely on them, or re-produce them for our readers. When the steamer from New York shall arrive with our regular files of papers, we shall be able to give a more reliable statement.