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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
Gen. McClellan's plans. The reported communication of Gen. McClellan to Mr. Colfax, M. C., of Indiana, in which he explained to that person that his expectations of a speedy conclusion of the present contest are based upon the anticipated determination of the Southern volunteers to return to their homes at the expiration of their present term of enlistment, sheds some light upon the long and mysterious inaction of the Federal army on the Potomac. It is presumptuous in a civilian to hazard an opinion upon military matters; but, to our uninitiated minds, it seems clear that McClellan has never, had the immense numbers at Washington which his organs pretend, or he would long since have made an advance movement. Can it be conceived that with an army of two hundred thousand men he would have waited more than three months after the battle of Manassas before renewing the attack upon the Confederates? Can it be supposed that when five months had passed, and the roads and weather held
Gen. McClellan's plans. The reported communication of Gen. McClellan to Mr. Colfax, M. C., of Indiana, in which he explained to that person that his expectations of a speedy conclusion of the present contest are based upon the anticipated determination of the Southern volunteers to return to their homes at the expiration of their present term of enlistment, sheds some light upon the long and mysterious inaction of the Federal army on the Potomac. It is presumptuous in a civilian to hazardplaces are supplied by new levies, to hurl his trained legions upon our militia, and realize the long cherished project of "On to Richmond." This, indeed, is said to have been explicitly stated by General McClellan in his conversation with Mr. Colfax. He appears to have felt no shame about it, considering it, as we suppose it may be considered by military men, a perfectly fair advantage to take of an enemy. Our own Government, of course, will do all it can to baffle this last resort of th
McClellan (search for this): article 2
Gen. McClellan's plans. The reported communication of Gen. McClellan to Mr. Colfax, M. C., of Indiana, in which he explained to that person that his expectations of a speedy conclusion of the prGen. McClellan to Mr. Colfax, M. C., of Indiana, in which he explained to that person that his expectations of a speedy conclusion of the present contest are based upon the anticipated determination of the Southern volunteers to return to their homes at the expiration of their present term of enlistment, sheds some light upon the long andto hazard an opinion upon military matters; but, to our uninitiated minds, it seems clear that McClellan has never, had the immense numbers at Washington which his organs pretend, or he would long sis unwilling to trust that number against the triumphant heroes of Manassas. The policy of McClellan — at least to us civilians it so seems — has been to hold the Confederates at Manassas by a ho project of "On to Richmond." This, indeed, is said to have been explicitly stated by General McClellan in his conversation with Mr. Colfax. He appears to have felt no shame about it, consideri