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Dreadful Collison accident --Two Hundred Men and Boys Buried in a Pit-- An accident buried two hundred persons in a coal pit, near Shields, England, on the 16th instant. The correspondent of the Manchester Guardlad telegraph on the 17th: "I have just returned from Hartley New Pit where two hundred men and lads are buried. The shaft has been closed up through the huge beam of the pumping engine falling down the pit yesterday. It carried the timber and the wood work down, and thus blocked the up and down cast shafts. The falling timber killed five out of eight men who were being drawn up in a cage at the time. The men and lads working below at the time of the accident have been buried forty-eight hours, notwithstanding the greatest exertions to relieve them on the part of the ablest men in the coal trade. The working seam is filling with water, and no doubt the horses, which are worth five hundred pounds, are already drowned. The men and lads, however, could escape
Dreadful Collison accident --Two Hundred Men and Boys Buried in a Pit-- An accident buried two hundred persons in a coal pit, near Shields, England, on the 16th instant. The correspondent of the Manchester Guardlad telegraph on the 17th: "I have just returned from Hartley New Pit where two hundred men and lads are buried. The shaft has been closed up through the huge beam of the pumping engine falling down the pit yesterday. It carried the timber and the wood work down, and thus blocked the up and down cast shafts. The falling timber killed five out of eight men who were being drawn up in a cage at the time. The men and lads working below at the time of the accident have been buried forty-eight hours, notwithstanding the greatest exertions to relieve them on the part of the ablest men in the coal trade. The working seam is filling with water, and no doubt the horses, which are worth five hundred pounds, are already drowned. The men and lads, however, could escape