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Jamestown (Virginia) (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
he writes thus of this feeling: The rumored condition of the interior counties of East Tennessee is not improved by the lapse of time. The people apprehend an immediate advance of the Northmen, and traitors to the South evince their joy in every village and neighborhood. Johnson and Maynard have advised their friends that they would soon return to their homes, and that the "grasp of secessionism should he relaxed." The scouts of the enemy have penetrated, so dame rumor tells us, to Jamestown, within fifty miles of Knoxville. Many of these stories are unfounded, and others, perhaps, exaggerated. Still the actual condition of popular sentiment in East Tennessee is ill understood by Southern statesmen and military chieftains. There is at this juncture a peculiar value attached to the possession of East Tennessee, not only because it gives us a railway connection with Virginia, but its productive hillsides and valleys must furnish vast supplies for our armies during the next ye
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 4
ctory in the West. Our splendid Western soldiers, under Generals Grant and McClernand, who, in their first encounter with the rebels at Belmont, exhibited the fighting qualities of Napoleon's Old Guard, have marched into the occupation of the valuable strategic defences of Fort Henry on the Tennessee river. Our troops occupy a good position at Fort Henry from which to advance westward upon Columbus, or eastward upon Bowling Green, in the rear — the two strongholds of the rebels in Western Kentucky, and upon the maintenance of which depends the rebel cause, not only in Kentucky and Tennessee, but along the whole line of the Mississippi down to New Orleans. This is why Beauregard has been transferred from Manassas to Columbus or Bowling Green; for the rebels have discovered that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of the Mississippi than on the line of the Potomac. We suppose that the next thing in order by our troops at Fort Henry will be the reduction of the sup
United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
t damaging character to Gen. Fremont, in both a military and civil point of view. It presented his conduct in a light so clearly weak and culpable that we cannot think the aspirations of the radical shriekers will be gratified. Pay of prisoners of War. The President has approved the joint resolution to authorize the Secretary of War to procure from such officers and enlisted men of the United States army as are now or hereafter may be held as prisoners of war in the so-called Confederate States, from time to time, their respective allotments of pay to their families or friends, upon which certified allotments the Secretary shall cause drafts to be made, payable in the city of New York or Boston, to the order of such persons to whom the allotments were or may be made, and to remit the drafts to the address of such persons as may be designated. War Department and the Telegraph. The President of the American Telegraph Company leaves Washington for New York to-morrow mor
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 4
ing spirit of this rebellion will be completely broken. In the interval, however, we do not imagine that Price and his guerillas will be left on the soil of Missouri; or that the Burnside expedition will be confined to reconnaissances of the inland waters of North Carolina; or that the powerful fleet of Dupont and the co-operriday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills were passed. Both Houses adjourned till Monday. The Abolition War on General M'Clellan. The Abolhe censor allowed us partially to indicate last night, but will strive in the Department of the Potomac to rival General Buell in Kentucky and General Halleck in Missouri, on a level with whom the new arrangement places him. It is understood that he has consulted with several of his Generals respecting the course proper for him to
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
e rebel cause, not only in Kentucky and Tennessee, but along the whole line of the Mississippi down to New Orleans. This is why Beauregard has been transferred from Manassas to Columbus or Bowling Green; for the rebels have discovered that their immediate danger is more pressing on the line of the Mississippi than on the line of the Potomac. We suppose that the next thing in order by our troops at Fort Henry will be the reduction of the supporting Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland river, at Dover, some ten miles across the hills at this point from the Tennessee; and, next, that those railroads will be occupied which connect the rebels on the Mississippi with the rebels in Virginia; and that then, as all that section of Kentucky lying between the Cumberland and the Mississippi is attached to the department of General Halleck, there will be, under his direction, a combined movement of all his disposable forces from Fort Henry, Mayfield, Paducah, Smithland, and Cairo, including Commodor
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 4
opted. The Judiciary Committee reported that Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loyalty has been questioned was entitled to take the constitutional oath. A minority report was, however, presented, and the papers were ordered to be printed. In the House of Representatives, the Treasury Note bill was by consent amended so as to allow the Treasury Department, at its option, to pay the interest on Government bonds in coin or paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills were passed.
Dutch (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
e House, referring to the tragedy at Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, when the pulse of the nation for a moment stood still; advantage was taken of its trembling necessities by speculators. He spoke of the cattle contract made in this city, whereby fifty thousand dollars was realized on two thousand head; of the agency of Alexander Cummings, in New York; of the immense amount of money paid to him without any vouchers of his purchase; of linen pantaloons, London porter, Scotch ale, and Dutch herring, for the use of the army. He next spoke of the character of the steamer Cataline, whereby a vessel worth $15,000 was chartered to the Government for $10,000 per month, and fifty thousand dollars to be paid in the event of her loss by war risks, intimating, also, that she was loaded for private speculation, to be run at the expense of the Government. He showed that her purchase was secured by four separate notes, signed respectively by Jno. E. Develin, Thurlow Weed, G. C. Davidson,
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 4
he recent successes of the Union land and naval forces in Tennessee, was announced in both Houses on the 7th inst., and received with applause. In the Senate, the bill appropriating ten millions of dollars for the construction of twenty iron-clad gun-boats was passed. The Treasury Note bill was received from the House, and referred to the Finance Committee. The bill authorizing an additional issue of ten million dollars of demand notes was passed. Resolutions of the Legislature of Rhode Island, urging the propriety of permanently locating the Naval Academy at Newport was presented. A joint resolution, giving the thanks of Congress to Captain Dupont and his officers and seamen for the victory at Port Royal, was adopted. The Judiciary Committee reported that Mr. Starke, the Senator from Oregon, whose loyalty has been questioned was entitled to take the constitutional oath. A minority report was, however, presented, and the papers were ordered to be printed. In the House o
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 4
paper. At the conclusion of the debate, Mr. Holman, of Indiana, offered a resolution, censuring Mr. Cameron, the late Secretary of War, and Mr. Welles, the present Secretary of the Navy, for their action in employing Alexander Cummings and George D. Morgan; but without coming to a vote, the subject was postponed till Friday next. The report of the Conference Committee on the bill providing for the completion of the defences of Washington, and the employment of Home, Guards in Missouri and Maryland, was agreed to. Several private bills were passed. Both Houses adjourned till Monday. The Abolition War on General M'Clellan. The Abolition organs, says the New York Herald, of the 7th instant, have been taking a remarkably deep interest in the reconstruction of the English War Department lately. They have been circulating a report that the Duke of Cambridge is about to resign, and that it has been determined to abolish the post of Commander-in-Chief and vest it in the Secret
Huntingdon, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 4
r of the steamer Cataline, whereby a vessel worth $15,000 was chartered to the Government for $10,000 per month, and fifty thousand dollars to be paid in the event of her loss by war risks, intimating, also, that she was loaded for private speculation, to be run at the expense of the Government. He showed that her purchase was secured by four separate notes, signed respectively by Jno. E. Develin, Thurlow Weed, G. C. Davidson, and C. B. Matteson. He next alluded to a horse contract at Huntingdon, Pa., when, on the purchase of 1,000 horses, the Treasury was the capital.--He then spoke of Mr. Morgan's agency, showing that although he had paid less than the owners asked, he had also paid more than the vessels cost; that in some cases vessels were charged to the Government at a higher price than the owners received; that the arrangement of Mr. Secretary Welles, allowing Mr. Morgan to take two and a half per cent, from the seller, was placing him in antagonism to the Government which emp
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