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Moses Hoge (search for this): article 4
The Christian Statesmen. This is the title of the sermon delivered by Rev. Moses Hoge, D. D., on the death of the late Judge Hemphill, and is marked by the characteristic vigor, discrimination and eloquence of its author. It rebukes in manly and stirring tones the vices of public men, and shows from the example of all history, that "righteousness exalted a nation." The sermon was published at the request of a large number of members of Congress, and will be read with universal admiration. Upon the text, "Righteousness exalted a nation," we have also in pamphlet form an admirable sermon from the learned Bishop Verot, Vicar Apostolic of Florida. In this sermon the domestic institutions of the South are vindicated in a masterly manner, and the duties of masters to their servants pointed out with equal cogency and fearlessness. The sermon is especially explicit and emphatic upon the stern and solemn responsibility of Christian masters for the religious and moral training of t
atesmen. This is the title of the sermon delivered by Rev. Moses Hoge, D. D., on the death of the late Judge Hemphill, and is marked by the characteristic vigor, discrimination and eloquence of its author. It rebukes in manly and stirring tones the vices of public men, and shows from the example of all history, that "righteousness exalted a nation." The sermon was published at the request of a large number of members of Congress, and will be read with universal admiration. Upon the text, "Righteousness exalted a nation," we have also in pamphlet form an admirable sermon from the learned Bishop Verot, Vicar Apostolic of Florida. In this sermon the domestic institutions of the South are vindicated in a masterly manner, and the duties of masters to their servants pointed out with equal cogency and fearlessness. The sermon is especially explicit and emphatic upon the stern and solemn responsibility of Christian masters for the religious and moral training of their dependents.
The Christian Statesmen. This is the title of the sermon delivered by Rev. Moses Hoge, D. D., on the death of the late Judge Hemphill, and is marked by the characteristic vigor, discrimination and eloquence of its author. It rebukes in manly and stirring tones the vices of public men, and shows from the example of all history, that "righteousness exalted a nation." The sermon was published at the request of a large number of members of Congress, and will be read with universal admiration. Upon the text, "Righteousness exalted a nation," we have also in pamphlet form an admirable sermon from the learned Bishop Verot, Vicar Apostolic of Florida. In this sermon the domestic institutions of the South are vindicated in a masterly manner, and the duties of masters to their servants pointed out with equal cogency and fearlessness. The sermon is especially explicit and emphatic upon the stern and solemn responsibility of Christian masters for the religious and moral training of t