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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 17, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 19 total hits in 6 results.

Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 6
Why Fort Henry was surrendered. --The Nashville Union and American says that the surrender of Fort Henry, under the circumstances, was inevitable, because of the high water of the Tennessee river, which was running almost into the fort, and threatening hourly to inundate it, thus making it a "slaughter pen" for the shells of the enemy, whose boats could take a position to completely command it. The location of this fort was unfortunately made during the period of Kentucky neutrality, whenobably be brought against it by the enemy by water, the Lincoln Government not having then devised the system of iron clad gun fleets which it has since adopted. The proper location for our fort ought to have been on the "Narrows," between the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, where the two rivers approach each other in their winding courses at a distance of only three miles, the intervening tongue of land being elevated and commanding both rivers. The considerations we have mentioned prevente
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
o located it, to refrain from occupying an eminence on the opposite bank of the river, which lies in the State of Kentucky, and which commands the fort.--It was deemed, however, sufficiently strong to resist any force which might probably be brought against it by the enemy by water, the Lincoln Government not having then devised the system of iron clad gun fleets which it has since adopted. The proper location for our fort ought to have been on the "Narrows," between the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, where the two rivers approach each other in their winding courses at a distance of only three miles, the intervening tongue of land being elevated and commanding both rivers. The considerations we have mentioned prevented its location at that point. Fort Henry is an elaborate and well-constructed earthwork, and had it been in a commanding position, would have excited the admiration of all engineers. We cannot describe it for want of sufficient information as to its construction and
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
. The location of this fort was unfortunately made during the period of Kentucky neutrality, when the President of the Confederate States and the Governor of Tennessee felt bound to scrupulously respect the position of our sister State, and before the forces of Lincoln had begun to make camping grounds of its soil. Under these circumstances, it was found necessary by the engineer who located it, to refrain from occupying an eminence on the opposite bank of the river, which lies in the State of Kentucky, and which commands the fort.--It was deemed, however, sufficiently strong to resist any force which might probably be brought against it by the enemy by water, the Lincoln Government not having then devised the system of iron clad gun fleets which it has since adopted. The proper location for our fort ought to have been on the "Narrows," between the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, where the two rivers approach each other in their winding courses at a distance of only three miles, th
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
merican says that the surrender of Fort Henry, under the circumstances, was inevitable, because of the high water of the Tennessee river, which was running almost into the fort, and threatening hourly to inundate it, thus making it a "slaughter pen" for the shells of the enemy, whose boats could take a position to completely command it. The location of this fort was unfortunately made during the period of Kentucky neutrality, when the President of the Confederate States and the Governor of Tennessee felt bound to scrupulously respect the position of our sister State, and before the forces of Lincoln had begun to make camping grounds of its soil. Under these circumstances, it was found necessary by the engineer who located it, to refrain from occupying an eminence on the opposite bank of the river, which lies in the State of Kentucky, and which commands the fort.--It was deemed, however, sufficiently strong to resist any force which might probably be brought against it by the enemy by
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
ed. --The Nashville Union and American says that the surrender of Fort Henry, under the circumstances, was inevitable, because of the high water of the Tennessee river, which was running almost into the fort, and threatening hourly to inundate it, thus making it a "slaughter pen" for the shells of the enemy, whose boats could take a position to completely command it. The location of this fort was unfortunately made during the period of Kentucky neutrality, when the President of the Confederate States and the Governor of Tennessee felt bound to scrupulously respect the position of our sister State, and before the forces of Lincoln had begun to make camping grounds of its soil. Under these circumstances, it was found necessary by the engineer who located it, to refrain from occupying an eminence on the opposite bank of the river, which lies in the State of Kentucky, and which commands the fort.--It was deemed, however, sufficiently strong to resist any force which might probably be
Wednesday Lincoln (search for this): article 6
high water of the Tennessee river, which was running almost into the fort, and threatening hourly to inundate it, thus making it a "slaughter pen" for the shells of the enemy, whose boats could take a position to completely command it. The location of this fort was unfortunately made during the period of Kentucky neutrality, when the President of the Confederate States and the Governor of Tennessee felt bound to scrupulously respect the position of our sister State, and before the forces of Lincoln had begun to make camping grounds of its soil. Under these circumstances, it was found necessary by the engineer who located it, to refrain from occupying an eminence on the opposite bank of the river, which lies in the State of Kentucky, and which commands the fort.--It was deemed, however, sufficiently strong to resist any force which might probably be brought against it by the enemy by water, the Lincoln Government not having then devised the system of iron clad gun fleets which it has