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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
my by the forces which they are sending from that point to North Carolina and Tennessee. If they longer remain in Virginia, they begin to realize the fact that they Upon two points depend their last chances in Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, and those two points are Manassas and Nashville. Whether they evacuate or a wounded--all Captains and Lieutenants. A Southern account of Affairs in Tennessee. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, which came to hand last night, contains the following account of the state of affairs in Tennessee, written by its editor, Mr. Glass, who, as our readers are aware, has been for some time past servy cause the fall of Nashville, and the surrender, for a time, of a portion of Tennessee, but the enemy has a long road to travel before he penetrates the heart of thr position, and lost 44 men out of 600 in doing so. Col. Forrest's cavalry of Tennessee, took one battery. It was nobly done, I was an eye-witness! What a sight it
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
eds of men was the subject of unmitigated loathing. Grown up men would tell you the enemy would be in the city in two hours, when he was at least 60 or 70 miles distant. Our loss in the fall of Nashville is very great. It was one of our largest depots of provisions, and the quantity of bacon sacrificed is immense. But it will not fall into the hands of the enemy, but be destroyed.--Indeed, the whole city should be fired by its people, so that the enemy would only match into a burning Moscow. Generals Pillow and Floyd and their staffs reached Nashville Sunday night. They are undismayed by their defeat, and will soon put the enemy to a severer test. These two men are the idols of the people and the army in this section. Universal confidence is put in them, and "Old Floyd" especially is pronounced to be one of the best Generals in the field. He was the only one who marched off any respectable portion of his brigade. R. H. G. Graphic description of the battle — by
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
oss. It will probably be, however, not less than twenty killed and fifty wounded. They lost three officers killed and eight wounded--all Captains and Lieutenants. A Southern account of Affairs in Tennessee. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, which came to hand last night, contains the following account of the state of affairs in Tennessee, written by its editor, Mr. Glass, who, as our readers are aware, has been for some time past serving with the army in the West: Murfreesboro, Tenn., Feb. 17, 1862. We have fallen back to this place, 32 miles East Nashville, where General Johnston has established his headquarters, and where, I presume, he intends to make a stand against the enemy. Our scattered columns begin to come in rapidly, and in a few days we will be in good trim again. This is the Bowling Green army, and comprises, amongst others, the brigades of Gen. Breckinridge, Gen. Hardee, and Gen. Hindman. They are as brave and daring a set of fellows as ever
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
They lost three officers killed and eight wounded--all Captains and Lieutenants. A Southern account of Affairs in Tennessee. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, which came to hand last night, contains the following account of the state of affairs in Tennessee, written by its editor, Mr. Glass, who, as our readers are aware, has been for some time past serving with the army in the West: Murfreesboro, Tenn., Feb. 17, 1862. We have fallen back to this place, 32 miles East Nashville, where General Johnston has established his headquarters, and where, I presume, he intends to make a stand against the enemy. Our scattered columns begin to come in rapidly, and in a few days we will be in good trim again. This is the Bowling Green army, and comprises, amongst others, the brigades of Gen. Breckinridge, Gen. Hardee, and Gen. Hindman. They are as brave and daring a set of fellows as ever trod the field. Before this reaches you, you will have heard of our disaster a
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
fire in the rear. Whether Nashville is to be abandoned or defended by Beauregard, we shall soon have an overwhelming force moving upon that important position, by land and water; and, with our occupation of Nashville, Memphis will become untenable to the rebels. And so, with the loss of Manassas and Nashville, they will be compelled to move down their northern defensive line within the boundaries of the seven original seceding cotton States--south Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, and Texas. Compressed within these limits, and invested and invaded on all sides, the people of the cotton States will be very apt to make short work of the rump of the Davis Government and the demoralized remnants of his wasted armies. And such are the prospects under which, on this anniversary of the birth of Washington, Jeff. Davis is to be inaugurated in Richmond as President, for six years, of a Southern Confederacy which will probably be reduced to its birthplace, the
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 15
ayette, but not being aware that such currency was received on deposit in Wall street, and for other reasons, the kind offer was declined. Capt. Johnson, of North Carolina, was one of those captured at Hatteras, and was only released from Fort Warren by exchange on the 10th of January last. He immediately rejoined what was left of his old regiment, and got in just in time to be taken again.--Some of his old friends of the 24th Massachusetts, who so carefully guarded him at Fort Warren, exFort Warren, expressed their joy at seeing him again, to which he gruffly replied that he "Wasn't glad to see them." He can now serve out his second term, and is justly entitled to the appellation of "an old offender." The capture of C. Jennings Wise. When the Zouaves had brought back the boats that were endeavoring to escape through Shallow Rock Bay, Wise, mortally wounded, was taken to the house of Mr. Samuel Jarvis, which had been converted into a hospital for the rebel wounded. He was shot in t
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 15
hunting money instead of preparing for defence. So it is all over the country. Able-bodied men are rushing to and fro, from east to west, speculating in the very life-blood of the people, at the moment the battering rams of an accursed enemy are playing upon the walls of our liberty's citadel. What but disaster can such a people expect, or what better do they deserve? The panic in Nashville on Sunday was, perhaps, never equalled since the affair at Bull Run. The news of the fall of Donelson reached the city just as the several congregations were assembled for morning worship. It was announced from the pulpits, and the ladies and children were told to look out for themselves. Such consternation was never seen before. All those who could do so packed up and fled the city. Every road was soon lined with rapidly flying vehicles, heaped with baggage and families. The rush at the cars was overwhelming. Nothing was ever seen like it. Not one hundred part got off who sought to g
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 15
le, with few exceptions, have been hunting money instead of preparing for defence. So it is all over the country. Able-bodied men are rushing to and fro, from east to west, speculating in the very life-blood of the people, at the moment the battering rams of an accursed enemy are playing upon the walls of our liberty's citadel. What but disaster can such a people expect, or what better do they deserve? The panic in Nashville on Sunday was, perhaps, never equalled since the affair at Bull Run. The news of the fall of Donelson reached the city just as the several congregations were assembled for morning worship. It was announced from the pulpits, and the ladies and children were told to look out for themselves. Such consternation was never seen before. All those who could do so packed up and fled the city. Every road was soon lined with rapidly flying vehicles, heaped with baggage and families. The rush at the cars was overwhelming. Nothing was ever seen like it. Not one h
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 15
inia, they begin to realize the fact that they will be expelled or captured; but if they abandon Virginia there will be no resting place for them this side of South Carolina. Upon two points depend their last chances in Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, and those two points are Manassas and Nashville. Whether they eva Manassas and Nashville, they will be compelled to move down their northern defensive line within the boundaries of the seven original seceding cotton States--south Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, and Texas. Compressed within these limits, and invested and invaded on all sides, the people of the c Davis is to be inaugurated in Richmond as President, for six years, of a Southern Confederacy which will probably be reduced to its birthplace, the swamps of South Carolina, within less than six weeks. The Roanoke Island Captures. Under the heading of Capture of "F. F. V's" a recent Northern account says: The prison
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 15
ut of ammunition on the right, and the was I was apprehensive of the result. But our boys took their fire without any ammunition, eagerly awaiting their nearer approach that they might " as they call it But they didn't give them a chance. The Yankees fell back, and it was not long before plenty of ammunition was at hand, and now they prepared them. We fought four days, and were up four nights, and under such circumstances a man might fall asleep whilst firing a gun and our Generals (Pillow, Bruckner, and Johnson) knew that a surrender was almost inevitable. General Floyd said he wouldn't surrender, and took his original division, Col. Wharton, and Col. McCausland, and started for Nashville. I fear that one of his regiments, the 20th Mississippi, was taken. I rode over, the battle-field. There were over 1,000 Yankees left dead? To give a correct idea of the number killed I ought to say 5,000. I rode over the field on which the battle (outside the breastworks) w
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