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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 12
gathered in little groups all over their camp, with their arms in their hands, in a perfect state of consternation. --Col. Bausenwein ordered the prisoners to fall into line and deliver up their arms. The men came forward and piled up their guns — of all descriptions, like those at Somerset. --In this camp there was about a cord of guns and two or three bushels of bowie-knives and revolvers. Passing a little to the north of the last-named camp was the camp of the Issaquah Artillery, from Louisiana. This was really a fine looking, well-uniformed set of men. Their uniform, like all their artillery, was of light gray, with red trimmings, their caps having a wide, red band. The three officers in charge of this battery were Lieuts. Spencer and Gibson, of Mississippi, and Lieut. Wilson, of Georgia. They delivered their horses and swords to Lieut. Col. Rempel; also, the six fine field pieces, together with all the appurtenances thereunto belonging. I found the above named officers well
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
Fort Donelson.Northern Reminiscences. incidents of the surrender — appearance of the battle field, &c. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, writing from Dover, Tenn., February 18, gives a long account of the surrender of Fort Donelson, and indulges in a good deal of romance for the entertainment of his Yankee readers. We copy a portion of his remarks: I had proceeded up our lines about two miles, and within a line of the rebel works, when cheer after cheer maght--the day of the surrender. Visit to the battle-field. A correspondent of the Chicago Times writes: Fort Donelson, Tenn., Feb. 17.--I was invited on Sunday morning by Gen. McClernand to take a ride over the battle-field. It would never to be described. The captured Confederates. We subjoin the Yankee statement of the forces captured at Fort Donelson, remarking by way of preface, that it exceeds by several regiments the list published in the Memphis Appeal of
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 12
camp there was about a cord of guns and two or three bushels of bowie-knives and revolvers. Passing a little to the north of the last-named camp was the camp of the Issaquah Artillery, from Louisiana. This was really a fine looking, well-uniformed set of men. Their uniform, like all their artillery, was of light gray, with red trimmings, their caps having a wide, red band. The three officers in charge of this battery were Lieuts. Spencer and Gibson, of Mississippi, and Lieut. Wilson, of Georgia. They delivered their horses and swords to Lieut. Col. Rempel; also, the six fine field pieces, together with all the appurtenances thereunto belonging. I found the above named officers well raised, gentlemanly fellows. Lieutenant Spencer was quite sullen, and said he considered their army had been sold by Floyd. I told him I had no doubt his disposition was good enough to do a thing of that kind, as the aforesaid gentleman had drove a most flourishing trade in stealing, which I con
Somerset, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 12
ent directions, lay four other dead bodies. One of them held in his hand a small pocket almanac. Across a ravine upon a hill to the right of the earthworks was the camp of a Mississippi regiment. The men were gathered in little groups all over their camp, with their arms in their hands, in a perfect state of consternation. --Col. Bausenwein ordered the prisoners to fall into line and deliver up their arms. The men came forward and piled up their guns — of all descriptions, like those at Somerset. --In this camp there was about a cord of guns and two or three bushels of bowie-knives and revolvers. Passing a little to the north of the last-named camp was the camp of the Issaquah Artillery, from Louisiana. This was really a fine looking, well-uniformed set of men. Their uniform, like all their artillery, was of light gray, with red trimmings, their caps having a wide, red band. The three officers in charge of this battery were Lieuts. Spencer and Gibson, of Mississippi, and Lieut.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
. Sugg. Fifty-first Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Brouder. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Billard. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, CoTennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Voorhees. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Abernathey. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Quaries. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col.Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Abernathey. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Quaries. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Varqueson. First Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lt., Col. Hamilton. Third Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lieut. Col. Wills. Fourth Mississippi Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Quaries. --Tennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Varqueson. First Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lt., Col. Hamilton. Third Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lieut. Col. Wills. Fourth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Drake. Twentieth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Colonel--. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Reynolds. --MississiTennessee regiment of infantry, Col. Varqueson. First Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lt., Col. Hamilton. Third Mississippi regiment of infantry, Lieut. Col. Wills. Fourth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Drake. Twentieth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Colonel--. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Reynolds. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Major Garwin. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Hughes. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Cook. Fourteenth MisAlabama, Col. Combs. Four detached companies of infantry. Battalion Tennessee cavalry, Col. Grant. Battalion Mississippi cavalry, Col. Forrest, 800 st
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
Fort Donelson.Northern Reminiscences. incidents of the surrender — appearance of the battle field, &c. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, writing from Dover, Tenn., February 18, gives a long account of the surrender of Fort Donelson, and indulges in a good deal of romance for the entertainment of his Yankee readers. We copy a portion of his remarks: I had proceeded up our lines about two miles, and within a line of the rebel works, when cheer after cheer made all the forest ring again. In a few moments two horsemen came down the bill at a rate of speed not outdone upon the Long Island race course, with the intelligence that two white flags, the signal for an unconditional surrender, had just been raised upon the highest point of the rebel fortification, I hastened on to join the 58th, and found them just entering the first of the enemy's works. Before reaching the point where the Parrot guns were placed on Saturday morning. I found an enfilading b
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 12
ry, Col. Drake. Twentieth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Colonel--. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Reynolds. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Major Garwin. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Hughes. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Cook. Fourteenth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Baldwin. Seventh Texas regiment of infantry, Col. Gregg Second Kentucky regiment of infantry, Col. Hanson. Eighth Kentucky regiment of infantry, Lt. Col. Lyon. --Arkansas regiment of infantry, Col. Lee. Major Donesy's battalion of infantry. Battalion Fourth Alabama, Col. Combs. Four detached companies of infantry. Battalion Tennessee cavalry, Col. Grant. Battalion Mississippi cavalry, Col. Forrest, 800 strong. Eight batteries light artillery. Floyd's Virginia brigade, consisting of the 36th, 50th, 51st, and 56th, in all 2,500 strong, and a thousand or fifteen hundred stragglers, escaped.
congratulate you that you are alive." Lieutenant Wilson said, "I fired the gun, and am d — d sorry I didn't kill you." When the Tennessee prisoners were in line, many little incidents of an amusing character took place; one of which I will relate. I said to them, "Gentlemen, what could ever have induced you to fight against that old flag?" A pleasant looking old Irishman quickly replied, "Please yer honor, what made you fight against the new flag? Tell me that now. " Well knowing that Pat would have the last word, I passed. * * * * * * * * I have talked with prisoners who were in the affair at Fort Henry, who say that our gunboats did no damage here, compared with what they did at that place. At Fort Henry the country is level, and there was nothing to interfere with their range — while here they could do nothing only at very short range or too long range, on account of the peculiarities of the location. It was supposed that mortars would be necessary before the work
y, Col. Drake. Twentieth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Colonel--. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Reynolds. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Major Garwin. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Hughes. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Cook. Fourteenth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Baldwin. Seventh Texas regiment of infantry, Col. Gregg Second Kentucky regiment of infantry, Col. Hanson. Eighth Kentucky regiment of infantry, Lt. Col. Lyon. --Arkansas regiment of infantry, Col. Lee. Major Donesy's battalion of infantry. Battalion Fourth Alabama, Col. Combs. Four detached companies of infantry. Battalion Tennessee cavalry, Col. Grant. Battalion Mississippi cavalry, Col. Forrest, 800 strong. Eight batteries light artillery. Floyd's Virginia brigade, consisting of the 36th, 50th, 51st, and 56th, in all 2,500 strong, and a thousand or fifteen hundred stragglers, escaped.
Fourth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Drake. Twentieth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Colonel--. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Reynolds. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Major Garwin. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Hughes. --Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Cook. Fourteenth Mississippi regiment of infantry, Col. Baldwin. Seventh Texas regiment of infantry, Col. Gregg Second Kentucky regiment of infantry, Col. Hanson. Eighth Kentucky regiment of infantry, Lt. Col. Lyon. --Arkansas regiment of infantry, Col. Lee. Major Donesy's battalion of infantry. Battalion Fourth Alabama, Col. Combs. Four detached companies of infantry. Battalion Tennessee cavalry, Col. Grant. Battalion Mississippi cavalry, Col. Forrest, 800 strong. Eight batteries light artillery. Floyd's Virginia brigade, consisting of the 36th, 50th, 51st, and 56th, in all 2,500 strong, and a thousand
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