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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
Literary intelligence. --The certainty of a refined literature for the Confederate States, to take the place of the demoralizing effusions of Northern penny-a-liners, is perhaps among the encouraging facts of the present struggle for independence. That the war will originate a vast number of romances, for years to come, there is no reason to question; and it is probable that some, under the almost inspired p of authors who have been eye-witnesses of what they write, v spring into being, and last as long as time itself shall endure. The field of literature however, is by no means confined to the survey of American events, nor even to the exciting incidents of the war. There are in the old world, traveled over by our own citizens, still fruitful of romance and adventure, which we expect to see worked no spread before Southern readers by Southern publishers. Indeed, we are now enabled to announce a forthcoming novel, from the press of West & Johnston, of this city, embracing a
sses of what they write, v spring into being, and last as long as time itself shall endure. The field of literature however, is by no means confined to the survey of American events, nor even to the exciting incidents of the war. There are in the old world, traveled over by our own citizens, still fruitful of romance and adventure, which we expect to see worked no spread before Southern readers by Southern publishers. Indeed, we are now enabled to announce a forthcoming novel, from the press of West & Johnston, of this city, embracing a history, romantic in itself, as well as truthful, of perhaps the most remarkable people in Europe — the "Garbonerl," --and so full of incident as to commend itself to the most casual reader. It is from the pen of Mrs. Vernen, a lady well known in Southern literary circles, who, in addition to forme writings, has recently come before the public in the stirring lyrical poem, "the Battle Call." We look for her forthcoming novel with much interest.
Sydney Johnston (search for this): article 2
esses of what they write, v spring into being, and last as long as time itself shall endure. The field of literature however, is by no means confined to the survey of American events, nor even to the exciting incidents of the war. There are in the old world, traveled over by our own citizens, still fruitful of romance and adventure, which we expect to see worked no spread before Southern readers by Southern publishers. Indeed, we are now enabled to announce a forthcoming novel, from the press of West & Johnston, of this city, embracing a history, romantic in itself, as well as truthful, of perhaps the most remarkable people in Europe — the "Garbonerl," --and so full of incident as to commend itself to the most casual reader. It is from the pen of Mrs. Vernen, a lady well known in Southern literary circles, who, in addition to forme writings, has recently come before the public in the stirring lyrical poem, "the Battle Call." We look for her forthcoming novel with much interest.
esses of what they write, v spring into being, and last as long as time itself shall endure. The field of literature however, is by no means confined to the survey of American events, nor even to the exciting incidents of the war. There are in the old world, traveled over by our own citizens, still fruitful of romance and adventure, which we expect to see worked no spread before Southern readers by Southern publishers. Indeed, we are now enabled to announce a forthcoming novel, from the press of West & Johnston, of this city, embracing a history, romantic in itself, as well as truthful, of perhaps the most remarkable people in Europe — the "Garbonerl," --and so full of incident as to commend itself to the most casual reader. It is from the pen of Mrs. Vernen, a lady well known in Southern literary circles, who, in addition to forme writings, has recently come before the public in the stirring lyrical poem, "the Battle Call." We look for her forthcoming novel with much interest.