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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Nassau County, Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
finding no enemy on shore to meet them.--About 10 o'clock that night the Yankees again opened on the city, and it is supposed that they were shelling the town. Fernandina, Fla. Fernandina is on Amelia Island, which forms a part of Nassau county, Florida, The island is sixteen miles in length by four in breadth, and is separated from the mainland by a strait from two to four miles wide. The northern and eastern sides of the island are bordered by rows of sand hills, and backed by a thickite Fernandina, on the other side of Amelia river, is Tiger Island, between which and Amelia island is the harbor, which is one of the best and, arest on the coast, though the draft of water is not equal to that of Beaufort or Brunswick. Nassau county, of which Amelia Island forms an important part, had, in 1850, a population of 2,161, of whom 1,077 were slaves — Its productions in that year were 404,805 pounds of rice, 29,812 bushels of Indian corn, 279 bales of cotton, and 44 hogsheads o
Camden (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
stols also, but with no damage other than slightly wounding a horse that was hitched about 250 yards from the edge of the bluff. Oar men fired from one to five shots each. One of them, a volunteer, a noted hunter and excellent marksman, fired five times, and each time selected his man — the one with the most brass buttons on, as he expressed it. After each shot, he did not again get a glimpse of his object. An hour intervened, when the boat was attacked again by Captain Lang's (of Camden county) company, who were similarly ambuscaded on a bluff about eight miles distant. One of the volunteers of Colonel Davis's mounted regiment shot both barrels of his gun, loaded with wire cartridges of "blue whistlers," or buckshot, into a group of four of the Federals on deck, about sixty yards from his position, and saw no more of them after he fired. A negro who had been a prisoner of the Yankees, and escaped from Amelia Island to the camp near Fernandina, states that he was made
Fernandina, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
Yankees, and escaped from Amelia Island to the camp near Fernandina, states that he was made to assist in burying 47 Yankeessly posted, retreated discomfited. The evacuation of Fernandina was conducted very badly, and much was lost owing to the property of the citizens. He was the last man to leave Fernandina, and was on the train that was fired on. He escaped by git is supposed that they were shelling the town. Fernandina, Fla. Fernandina is on Amelia Island, which forms a partFernandina is on Amelia Island, which forms a part of Nassau county, Florida, The island is sixteen miles in length by four in breadth, and is separated from the mainland by island and the mainland is called, stands the village of Fernandina, or New Fernandina, as it is called, to distinguish it from Old. Fernandina, a decayed Spanish settlement a little to the northward of the new town, Opposite Fernandina, on the othFernandina, on the other side of Amelia river, is Tiger Island, between which and Amelia island is the harbor, which is one of the best and, arest
Brunswick, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
hurried back. Capt. Rockwell's company, stationed at a battery near by, went to the assistance of the pickets on hearing the firing. About midnight, the Federals returned and commenced an attack. Firing was kept up on both sides for some time, but with no injury to our men. How the Yankees fared on this, their second. visit, could not be ascertained; but it is presumed they were satisfied to retrace their steps, without waiting to find out what success they met with. Skirmish at Brunswick, Ga. Col. Carey W. Stiles visited Brunswick early yesterday morning, in command of a battalion. The enemy were not in the city but on board their vessels in the harbor--Eight Yankee soldiers were engaged gathering oysters within musket ra ge from the bank, and the temptation induced one of our men, a printer, belonging to the Jackson Artillery, who had accompanied the expedition, to pull trigger on them and killed one of the party. The rest began to row stily away, when other shots wer
Amelia River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
strait from two to four miles wide. The northern and eastern sides of the island are bordered by rows of sand hills, and backed by a thick forest of pine, palmette, oak, and undergrowth. On the western side of the island, on the shore of Amelia-river, as the channel between the island and the mainland is called, stands the village of Fernandina, or New Fernandina, as it is called, to distinguish it from Old. Fernandina, a decayed Spanish settlement a little to the northward of the new town, Opposite Fernandina, on the other side of Amelia river, is Tiger Island, between which and Amelia island is the harbor, which is one of the best and, arest on the coast, though the draft of water is not equal to that of Beaufort or Brunswick. Nassau county, of which Amelia Island forms an important part, had, in 1850, a population of 2,161, of whom 1,077 were slaves — Its productions in that year were 404,805 pounds of rice, 29,812 bushels of Indian corn, 279 bales of cotton, and 44 hogsh
Augustin Creek (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 1
n current that the troops in Florida are to be withdrawn. We are credibly informed that such is not the case, and that they are not only to remain, but every man in the State is determined to come to their aid and fight to the death. Florida, though a young State, will do her share, and can bring into the field her quota of good marksmen. Picket firing. Between 6 and 7 o'clock Tuesday evening, a Yankee barge, containing some eight or ten men, was discovered by our pickets, in Augustine creek supposed to be taking soundings or reconnoitering. Two of the picke's fired at them, and one was seen to fall. The enemy returned the fire, but missed their mark.--They then hurried back. Capt. Rockwell's company, stationed at a battery near by, went to the assistance of the pickets on hearing the firing. About midnight, the Federals returned and commenced an attack. Firing was kept up on both sides for some time, but with no injury to our men. How the Yankees fared on this, their
ir Republic rises fair and stately to the eye, but the fire upon its shrines has gone out, the priests are wallowing in iniquity, the worshippers celebrate obscene orgies, and the demon of despotism, with a liberty cap on his head, sits on an afar, beneath which rise the groans of miserable, captives, and on which libations of tears and blood are daily offered. An outside people in dress, houses, professions, polities, morals, religion, and philanthropy! "We are a Christian people," quoth Burnside and Goldaborough, "and fully alive to the responsibilities, of that character." Bang rear their heavy cannon, and whit go the bombshells into boat loads of women and children, giving a solemn Amen to their meek sad humble assumption to themselves of the merciful and humane virtues of Christianity. It is therefore natural that when this outside people alight on the coast of a country, they should conclude that the inside follows as a matter of course. The coast of their own section is
John D. Quarles (search for this): article 1
e time to send the accused on to a called courte; but, for the purpose of getting additional evidence, continued the case until this morning. Rebecca Chandler, a white girl, was arraigned for trespassing on the premises of Robert Gary, and destroying his property. It appeared that to get to her residence she has to pass through the garden of Gary, and while in the act of so doing, a few nights since, with a companion, the couple were ordered out by Gary — a command which they refused to obey, and retorted on him by pulling up and throwing at his person a few turnips, and perhaps other vegetables. Thus was Gary's property destroyed by the erratic Miss Chandler. The Mayor announced his intention of sending her to jail, but it is presumed he did not. Edward, slave of John D. Quarles, was ordered to be whipped for throwing stones in the streets. It is a pity the Mayor did not have the power to order a good many of the white urchins the same punishment for similar offences.
Rebecca Chandler (search for this): article 1
tness, an honest, simple looking chap, identified the accused as one of your men who assaulted, robbed him, and after wards recovered his watch, and pistol from him; but the money had been handed over to a confederate. One hundred dollars in gold was found on Finnoven, no doubt the nett proceeds of the robbery. The Mayor had determined at one time to send the accused on to a called courte; but, for the purpose of getting additional evidence, continued the case until this morning. Rebecca Chandler, a white girl, was arraigned for trespassing on the premises of Robert Gary, and destroying his property. It appeared that to get to her residence she has to pass through the garden of Gary, and while in the act of so doing, a few nights since, with a companion, the couple were ordered out by Gary — a command which they refused to obey, and retorted on him by pulling up and throwing at his person a few turnips, and perhaps other vegetables. Thus was Gary's property destroyed by the er
Patrick Finnoven (search for this): article 1
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --Patrick Finnoven, alias James Coyne, an ill-featured looking customer pretending to hall from Nashville, Tennessee, underwent yesterday another partial examination before the Mayor for robbing Ashbury Inber of $750, a watch, and pistol. The witness, an honest, simple looking chap, identified the accused as one of your men who assaulted, robbed him, and after wards recovered his watch, and pistol from him; but the money had been handed over to a confederate. One hundred dollars in gold was found on Finnoven, no doubt the nett proceeds of the robbery. The Mayor had determined at one time to send the accused on to a called courte; but, for the purpose of getting additional evidence, continued the case until this morning. Rebecca Chandler, a white girl, was arraigned for trespassing on the premises of Robert Gary, and destroying his property. It appeared that to get to her residence she has to pass through the garden of Gary, and while in the act
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